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Author (up) Reiter, R.J.; Tan, D.-X.; Korkmaz, A.; Ma, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Obesity and metabolic syndrome: association with chronodisruption, sleep deprivation, and melatonin suppression Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Annals of Medicine Abbreviated Journal Ann Med  
  Volume 44 Issue 6 Pages 564-577  
  Keywords Human Health; Adolescent; Adult; Animals; Child; Chronobiology Disorders/*epidemiology; Comorbidity; Disease Models, Animal; Humans; Light/adverse effects; Melatonin/*deficiency/physiology; Metabolic Syndrome X/*epidemiology; Mice; Obesity/*epidemiology; Rats; Sleep Deprivation/*epidemiology  
  Abstract Obesity has become an epidemic in industrialized and developing countries. In 30 years, unless serious changes are made, a majority of adults and many children will be classified as overweight or obese. Whereas fatness alone endangers physiological performance of even simple tasks, the associated co-morbidity of obesity including metabolic syndrome in all its manifestations is a far more critical problem. If the current trend continues as predicted, health care systems may be incapable of handling the myriad of obesity-related diseases. The financial costs, including those due to medical procedures, absenteeism from work, and reduced economic productivity, will jeopardize the financial well-being of industries. The current review summarizes the potential contributions of three processes that may be contributing to humans becoming progressively more overweight: circadian or chronodisruption, sleep deficiency, and melatonin suppression. Based on the information provided in this survey, life-style factors (independent of the availability of abundant calorie-rich foods) may aggravate weight gain. Both epidemiological and experimental data support associations between disrupted physiological rhythms, a reduction in adequate sleep, and light-at-night-induced suppression of an essential endogenously produced molecule, melatonin. The implication is that if these problems were corrected with life-style changes, body-weight could possibly be more easily controlled.  
  Address Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, UT Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas, USA. reiter@uthscsa.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0785-3890 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21668294 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 523  
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