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Author (up) Lockley, S.W.; Brainard, G.C.; Czeisler, C.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title High sensitivity of the human circadian melatonin rhythm to resetting by short wavelength light Type Journal Article
  Year 2003 Publication The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism Abbreviated Journal J Clin Endocrinol Metab  
  Volume 88 Issue 9 Pages 4502-4505  
  Keywords Human Health; Adult; Area Under Curve; Circadian Rhythm/*radiation effects; Female; Humans; *Light; Male; Melatonin/*metabolism; Pineal Gland/metabolism/radiation effects; Saliva/metabolism; Non-programmatic  
  Abstract The endogenous circadian oscillator in mammals, situated in the suprachiasmatic nuclei, receives environmental photic input from specialized subsets of photoreceptive retinal ganglion cells. The human circadian pacemaker is exquisitely sensitive to ocular light exposure, even in some people who are otherwise totally blind. The magnitude of the resetting response to white light depends on the timing, intensity, duration, number and pattern of exposures. We report here that the circadian resetting response in humans, as measured by the pineal melatonin rhythm, is also wavelength dependent. Exposure to 6.5 h of monochromatic light at 460 nm induces a two-fold greater circadian phase delay than 6.5 h of 555 nm monochromatic light of equal photon density. Similarly, 460 nm monochromatic light causes twice the amount of melatonin suppression compared to 555 nm monochromatic light, and is dependent on the duration of exposure in addition to wavelength. These studies demonstrate that the peak of sensitivity of the human circadian pacemaker to light is blue-shifted relative to the three-cone visual photopic system, the sensitivity of which peaks at approximately 555 nm. Thus photopic lux, the standard unit of illuminance, is inappropriate when quantifying the photic drive required to reset the human circadian pacemaker.  
  Address Division of Sleep Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0021-972X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:12970330 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 778  
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