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Author Cho, J.R.; Joo, E.Y.; Koo, D.L.; Hong, S.B.
Title Let there be no light: the effect of bedside light on sleep quality and background electroencephalographic rhythms Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal (down) Sleep Med
Volume 14 Issue 12 Pages 1422-1425
Keywords Eeg; Light; Polysomnography; Sleep; Sleep spindle; Slow oscillation
Abstract OBJECTIVES: Artificial lighting has been beneficial to society, but unnecessary light exposure at night may cause various health problems. We aimed to investigate how whole-night bedside light can affect sleep quality and brain activity. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Ten healthy sleepers underwent two polysomnography (PSG) sessions, one with the lights off and one with the lights on. PSG variables related to sleep quality were extracted and compared between lights-off and lights-on sleep. Spectral analysis was performed to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and non-REM (NREM) sleep epochs to reveal any light-induced differences in background brain rhythms. RESULTS: Lights-on sleep was associated with increased stage 1 sleep (N1), decreased slow-wave sleep (SWS), and increased arousal index. Spectral analysis revealed that theta power (4-8Hz) during REM sleep and slow oscillation (0.5-1Hz), delta (1-4Hz), and spindle (10-16Hz) power during NREM sleep were decreased in lights-on sleep conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Sleeping with the light on not only causes shallow sleep and frequent arousals but also has a persistent effect on brain oscillations, especially those implicated in sleep depth and stability. Our study demonstrates additional hazardous effect of light pollution on health.
Address Department of Neurology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Division of Computation and Neural Systems, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24210607 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 141
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Author Smith, M.R.; Revell, V.L.; Eastman, C.I.
Title Phase advancing the human circadian clock with blue-enriched polychromatic light Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal (down) Sleep Med
Volume 10 Issue 3 Pages 287-294
Keywords Adult; Circadian Rhythm/*radiation effects; Female; Humans; *Light; Lighting/*methods; Male; Melatonin/metabolism; Phototherapy/*methods; Sleep; Wakefulness; Young Adult; blue light; sleep
Abstract BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that the human circadian system is maximally sensitive to short-wavelength (blue) light. Whether this sensitivity can be utilized to increase the size of phase shifts using light boxes and protocols designed for practical settings is not known. We assessed whether bright polychromatic lamps enriched in the short-wavelength portion of the visible light spectrum could produce larger phase advances than standard bright white lamps. METHODS: Twenty-two healthy young adults received either a bright white or bright blue-enriched 2-h phase advancing light pulse upon awakening on each of four treatment days. On the first treatment day the light pulse began 8h after the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO), on average about 2h before baseline wake time. On each subsequent day, light treatment began 1h earlier than the previous day, and the sleep schedule was also advanced. RESULTS: Phase advances of the DLMO for the blue-enriched (92+/-78 min, n=12) and white groups (76+/-45 min, n=10) were not significantly different. CONCLUSION: Bright blue-enriched polychromatic light is no more effective than standard bright light therapy for phase advancing circadian rhythms at commonly used therapeutic light levels.
Address Biological Rhythms Research Laboratory, Rush University Medical Center, Suite 425, 1645 W. Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:18805055; PMCID:PMC2723863 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 289
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Author Sharkey, K.M.; Carskadon, M.A.; Figueiro, M.G.; Zhu, Y.; Rea, M.S.
Title Effects of an advanced sleep schedule and morning short wavelength light exposure on circadian phase in young adults with late sleep schedules Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal (down) Sleep Med
Volume 12 Issue 7 Pages 685-692
Keywords Affect/physiology/radiation effects; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology/*radiation effects; Color; Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation; Female; Humans; *Light; Male; Melatonin/metabolism; Photoperiod; Phototherapy/*methods; Saliva/metabolism; Sleep/physiology/radiation effects; Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/prevention & control/*therapy; Stress, Psychological/prevention & control/therapy; Treatment Outcome; Young Adult; blue light
Abstract OBJECTIVE: We examined the effects of an advanced sleep/wake schedule and morning short wavelength (blue) light in 25 adults (mean age+/-SD=21.8+/-3 years; 13 women) with late sleep schedules and subclinical features of delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD). METHODS: After a baseline week, participants kept individualized, fixed, advanced 7.5-h sleep schedules for 6days. Participants were randomly assigned to groups to receive “blue” (470nm, approximately 225lux, n=12) or “dim” (<1lux, n=13) light for 1h after waking each day. Head-worn “Daysimeters” measured light exposure; actigraphs and sleep diaries confirmed schedule compliance. Salivary dim light melatonin onset (DLMO), self-reported sleep, and mood were examined with 2x2 ANOVA. RESULTS: After 6days, both groups showed significant circadian phase advances, but morning blue light was not associated with larger phase shifts than dim-light exposure. The average DLMO advances (mean+/-SD) were 1.5+/-1.1h in the dim light group and 1.4+/-0.7h in the blue light group. CONCLUSIONS: Adherence to a fixed advanced sleep/wake schedule resulted in significant circadian phase shifts in young adults with subclinical DSPD with or without morning blue light exposure. Light/dark exposures associated with fixed early sleep schedules are sufficient to advance circadian phase in young adults.
Address Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Box G-RIH, Providence, RI 02912, USA. katherine_sharkey@brown.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:21704557; PMCID:PMC3145013 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 303
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Author Dumont, M.; Beaulieu, C.
Title Light exposure in the natural environment: relevance to mood and sleep disorders Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal (down) Sleep Med
Volume 8 Issue 6 Pages 557-565
Keywords Human Health; Affect; *Biological Clocks; *Circadian Rhythm; Humans; *Light; Mood Disorders/*etiology; Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/*complications; Wakefulness; Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract In addition to being necessary for vision, light also plays a primary role in circadian physiology. Humans are diurnal animals and their biological clock synchronizes their physiological functions in such a way that functions associated with activity happen in the daytime while functions associated with rest occur at night. A misalignment between the endogenous circadian clock and the desired sleep schedule is the main cause of circadian sleep disorders; it may be involved in certain mood disorders as well. Since light is the main environmental cue used by the biological clock to set its own timing in relation to the day-night cycle, inappropriate light exposure can be involved in the physiopathology of circadian disorders. Conversely, when handled properly, controlled light exposure can be used to treat some mood and sleep disorders. While the earliest studies in the field focused solely on exposure to bright light, contemporary studies aim at understanding how the entire profile of light-dark exposure can influence the circadian clock and, consequently, mood, sleep, and vigilance quality. Following a brief summary of the main concepts underlying the non-visual effects of light, this paper presents some studies using ambulatory measurements of light exposure to illustrate how these concepts apply in real-life situations and discusses the clinical relevance of light exposure in the natural environment for mood, sleep, and circadian disorders.
Address Chronobiology Laboratory, Sacre-Coeur Hospital of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H4J 1C5. marie.dumont@umontreal.ca
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:17383230 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 736
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Author Skene, D.J.; Arendt, J.
Title Circadian rhythm sleep disorders in the blind and their treatment with melatonin Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal (down) Sleep Med
Volume 8 Issue 6 Pages 651-655
Keywords Human Health; Blindness/*complications; Chronotherapy; Circadian Rhythm/drug effects; Humans; Melatonin/*administration & dosage; Sleep/drug effects; Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/*drug therapy/*etiology; Treatment Outcome
Abstract People who are blind, in addition to having to cope with partial or no sight, have an added handicap; the transmission of ocular light from the retina to their circadian clock is impaired. At its worse, for example in people with both eyes enucleated, this lesion results in desynchronisation of the biological clock (located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei) from the 24h day/night environment. While in a desynchronised state, symptoms akin to jet lag are experienced (e.g., daytime sleepiness, poor night sleep, reduced alertness and performance during waking). This is a lifelong condition. Daily administration of exogenous melatonin is the current treatment of choice for this so-called “non-24h sleep/wake disorder”. Melatonin has been shown to correct the underlying circadian rhythm abnormality as well as improve sleep and reduce daytime napping. The effectiveness of melatonin therapy depends upon its time of administration relative to the timing of the person's circadian clock. If practicable, assessment of an individual's circadian phase (by measurement of the endogenous melatonin rhythm in plasma, saliva or urine) is recommended prior to commencing treatment to optimise melatonin's effectiveness.
Address Centre for Chronobiology, School of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, UK. d.skene@surrey.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:17420154 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 811
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