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Author Froy, O.; Gotter, A.L.; Casselman, A.L.; Reppert, S.M.
Title Illuminating the circadian clock in monarch butterfly migration Type Journal Article
Year 2003 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal (down) Science
Volume 300 Issue 5623 Pages 1303-1305
Keywords Animals; *Animal Migration; Biological Clocks/*physiology; Butterflies/genetics/*physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Cloning, Molecular; Darkness; Flight, Animal; Light; Nuclear Proteins/genetics/physiology; Period Circadian Proteins; Solar System; Ultraviolet Rays; butterflies; monarch
Abstract Migratory monarch butterflies use a time-compensated Sun compass to navigate to their overwintering grounds in Mexico. Here, we report that constant light, which disrupts circadian clock function at both the behavioral and molecular levels in monarchs, also disrupts the time-compensated component of flight navigation. We further show that ultraviolet light is important for flight navigation but is not required for photic entrainment of circadian rhythms. Tracing these distinct light-input pathways into the brain should aid our understanding of the clock-compass mechanisms necessary for successful migration.
Address Department of Neurobiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, LRB-728, 364 Plantation Street, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:12764200 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1072
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Author Warrant, E.
Title Visual tracking in the dead of night Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal (down) Science
Volume 348 Issue 6240 Pages 1212-1213
Keywords Animals; Vision; Commentary
Abstract
Address Department of Biology, Lund University, 22362 Lund, Sweden. eric.warrant@biol.lu.se
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ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26068837 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1213
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Author Sponberg, S.; Dyhr, J.P.; Hall, R.W.; Daniel, T.L.
Title Luminance-dependent visual processing enables moth flight in low light Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal (down) Science
Volume 348 Issue 6240 Pages 1245-1248
Keywords Animals; Vision
Abstract Animals must operate under an enormous range of light intensities. Nocturnal and twilight flying insects are hypothesized to compensate for dim conditions by integrating light over longer times. This slowing of visual processing would increase light sensitivity but should also reduce movement response times. Using freely hovering moths tracking robotic moving flowers, we showed that the moth's visual processing does slow in dim light. These longer response times are consistent with models of how visual neurons enhance sensitivity at low light intensities, but they could pose a challenge for moths feeding from swaying flowers. Dusk-foraging moths avoid this sensorimotor tradeoff; their nervous systems slow down but not so much as to interfere with their ability to track the movements of real wind-blown flowers.
Address Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26068850 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1214
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Author Bazell, R.J.
Title Star Bright, Street Light, Which Will They See Tonight? Type Magazine Article
Year 1971 Publication Science Abbreviated Journal (down) Science
Volume 171 Issue Pages 461
Keywords Society; light pollution; history; historical
Abstract Astronomers are asking that Tucson modify its outdoor lighting so that their view of the heavens will not be obstructed by the city's nighttime glare. Workers at the five observatories: in the mountains surrounding this rapidly growing city of 300,000 fear that in the future they will be unable to observe certain astronomical phenomena, if the amount of light coming from the city continues to increase.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher AAAS Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1257
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Author Thompson, G.
Title Spiders and the electric light Type Journal Article
Year 1887 Publication Science Abbreviated Journal (down) Science
Volume 9 Issue 208 Pages 92
Keywords Ecology; artificial light at night; spiders; arachnids
Abstract Some disadvantage or evil appears to be attendant upon every invention, and the electric light is not an exception in this respect. In this city they have been placed in positions with a view of illuminating the buildings, notably the treasury, and a fine and striking effect is produced. At the same time, a species of spider has discovered that game is plentiful in their vicinity, and that he can ply his craft both day and night. In consequence, their webs are so thick and numerous that portions of the architectural ornamentation are no longer visible, and when torn down by the wind, or when they fall from decay, the refuse gives a dingy and dirty appearance to every thing it comes in contact with. Not only this, but these adventurers take possession of the portion of the ceiling of any room which receives the illumination. It would be of interest to know whether this spider is confined to a certain latitude, and at what seasons of the year our temperature we can indulge in our illumination.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher AAAS Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1267
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