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Author Shillo, R., & Halevy, A. H.
Title Interaction of photoperiod and temperature in flowering-control of Gypsophila paniculata L Type Journal Article
Year 1982 Publication Scientia Horticulturae Abbreviated Journal (up)
Volume 16 Issue 4 Pages 385-393
Keywords Plants
Abstract Long day promotes flowering of Gysophila paniculata L cultivar ‘Bristol Fairy’. Repeated treatments with GA3 or GA4 + 7 in short days did not promote flowering. The long photoperiod is effective only at relatively high temperatures. At night temperatures below 12°C, the plants remain vegetative even in long days. Efficient artificial lighting is from incandescent lamps at 60–100 lux. Fluorescent lighting (Cool-White) is not effective. Lighting of 4 hours as a night-break or at the end of the night were equally effective, but 4 hours lighting as a day-extension was less effective. Whole-night lighting promoted flowering more than any of the 4-hour lighting regimes. Cyclic lighting of one third light in each cycle promoted flowering to the same extent as continuous lighting. Light intensity during the day has a decisive effect on flower production.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2370
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Author Stone, E.M.; Jones, G.; Harris, S.
Title Conserving energy at a cost to biodiversity? Impacts of LED lighting on bats Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal (up)
Volume 18 Issue 8 Pages 2458–2465
Keywords Animals; anthropogenic impacts; biodiversity conservation; climate change targets; LED street lights; light pollution; light-emitting diodes
Abstract Artificial lighting is a key biodiversity threat and produces 1900 million tonnes of CO 2 emissions globally, more than three times that produced by aviation. The need to meet climate change targets has led to a global increase in energy-efficient light sources such as high-brightness light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Despite the energetic benefits of LEDs, their ecological impacts have not been tested. Using an experimental approach, we show that LED street lights caused a reduction in activity of slow-flying bats ( Rhinolophus hipposideros and Myotis spp.). Both R. hipposideros and Myotis spp. activities were significantly reduced even during low light levels of 3.6 lux. There was no effect of LED lighting on the relatively fast-flying Pipistrellus pipistrellus, Pipistrellus pygmaeus and Nyctalus/Eptesicus spp. We provide the first evidence of the effects of LED lights on bats. Despite having considerable energy-saving benefits, LED lights can potentially fragment commuting routes for bats with associated negative conservation consequences. Our results add to the growing evidence of negative impacts of lighting on a wide range of taxa. We highlight the complexities involved in simultaneously meeting targets for reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and biodiversity loss. New lighting strategies should integrate climate change targets with the cultural, social and ecological impacts of emerging lighting technologies.
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Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 395
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Author Seenappa, S.N.
Title Effect of Photoperiodism on Feeding and Defecation in Compost Earthworm Eudrilus eugeniae Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Universal Journal of Environmental Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal (up)
Volume 2 Issue 1 Pages 21-25
Keywords Animals; Photoperiodic effect; feeding rate; Eudrilus eugeniae; synchronization and re-synchronization
Abstract The effects of different fixed photoperiodic regimes on the rate of feeding and defecation in the epigeic

oligochaete (Eudrilus eugeniae) has been investigated. The different photoperiods stipulated were Natural 12hr

Light: 12hr Dark (natural LD 12:12), Reversal of 12hr Light: 12hr Dark ( reversal LD 12:12), 24hr Light source (L

24), 24hr Dark (D 24) and control set (natural rhythm) were experienced by E. eugeniae in the course of the

study. The experiments were carried out during the ambient winter (26 degree C + 2 ) and all clitellate worms

showed varied feeding and defecation activities. Worms fed actively only during night times under natural LD

12: 12. when exposed to reversal LD 12:12 revealed acclimatization to the changed conditions of day and night

by the end of 2nd week and started feeding voraciously. Worms that were maintained in D 24 showed enhanced

feeding rate with increased biomass over the worms that were maintained in natural LD 12:12 and natural

rhythm (control set). ANOVA and ANCOVA tests applied revealed that the total darkness or diffused light

without any disturbance influenced the feeding rate of worms that in turn showed higher production of

defecation as vermicompost. The critical difference (C.D.) of ANOVA was 0.98(0.05%) and the difference for

testing among treatments in ANCOVA was 781191.15(0.05). Resynchronization pattern were seen when

changed to reversal LD 12:12 from natural LD 12:12. Observations revealed that worms were confused from day

1-4 when any changed photoperiodic devices were fixed other than their regular normal pattern of Light and

Dark cycle and later got acclimatization into the induced photoperiodic cycles. The study apart from proving the

exogenous factors on the photoperiodic effects also proven the importance of darkness to the worms in

defecation that has importance in the conversion of given substrate at a faster pase.
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Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 396
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Author Hasan, N.M.
Title Comparison of the onset of dawn chorus of bulbuls and house sparrows in two different geographical locations: effect of climate, noise and light pollution. Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Research Opinions in Animal & Veterinary Sciences Abbreviated Journal (up)
Volume 1 Issue 4 Pages 220-225
Keywords Animals; bulbul; Pycnonotidae; house sparrow; Passer domesticus; Tulkarem; Ar-Rayyan; Palestinian Authority; Riyadh; Saudi Arabia; dawn chorus; urbanization
Abstract The onset of dawn chorus was studied for a period of fourteen months for bulbuls (Pycnonotidae) and house sparrows (Passer domesticus) in two different geographical locations. One is very quiet and semi lit place in the suburbs of the small Mediterranean city of Tulkarem/Palestinian Authority. The other location is comparatively noisy and very well lit place in the Ar-Rayyan urban district of the city of Riyadh/ Saudi Arabia where desert climate prevails. This study is the first of its kind and clearly shows that the timing of dawn chorus is similar for

autumn and winter seasons in both locations but major differences were observed from February until September between the two locations. It can be concluded that very early timing of dawn chorus during spring / summer for the Riyadh location cannot only be attributed to breeding season and is temperature dependent (strong positive correlation, r>0.6). The similarities for autumn and early winter between the two locations is very interesting in that it is not in agreement with the notion that big cities (urbanization) influence the timing of dawn chorus due to noise and light pollution. This emphasizes that dawn chorus is a complex process and that change in the onset and pattern of dawn chorus can not merely be attributed to one variable such as noise or light pollution alone.
Address Department of Basic sciences, College of Medicine, King Saud bin Abdel Aziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh 11426, Saudi Arabia
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 2221-1896 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 397
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Author Kulczykowska, E.; Popek, W.; Kapoor. B.G.; editors
Title Biological Clock in Fish. Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication CRC Press Abbreviated Journal (up)
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Animals
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Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 398
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