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Author Luo, Wei (ed) pdf  url
openurl 
  Title Outdoor lighting – Mesopic photometry, adaptation conditions and user preferences in pedestrian way lighting Type Book Whole
  Year 2014 Publication Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract The starting point of this work is to review the current recommendations and criteria of road and pedestrian way lighting. At present, the emphasis of traffic safety, the increasing energy costs, and improvements in mesopic photometry have led to new discussions about the accuracy of the recommendations for road lighting. Sufficient road lighting is generally based on the lighting requirements given in different lighting classes.



For road lighting, the value of 2 cd/m2 is recommended as the minimum average road surface luminance for the highest lighting class in the CIE and CEN publications. The basis of the average road surface luminance for the lower lighting classes is unknown and lacks experimental works. Moreover, the experimental set-ups of the studies conducted in the 1930s and 1950s do not meet the conditions of motor traffic lighting nowadays. They also have deficiencies in the number and age distributions of the subjects. The values of the average horizontal illuminances of the pedestrian way lighting recommendations are based on studies conducted in the 1970s and 1980s. However, no information exists on how the recommended illuminance values are derived for the different lighting classes.

The current recommendations for outdoor lighting are based on photopic photometry, this is daylight visibility conditions. In outdoor lighting, the luminances are in the mesopic range. The CIE recommended system for mesopic photometry should be used in providing recommendations and criteria for both road and pedestrian way lighting. Before implementing mesopic photometry, the adaptation luminance of the road users should be known. This study examined the adaptation conditions of pedestrians based on eye-tracking measurements. A case study in a pedestrian way was conducted in Chongqing of China. The study is related to the currently ongoing task of the CIE JCT-1 Implementation of CIE 191 System for Mesopic Photometry in Outdoor Lighting, which is to investigate adaptation and viewing conditions and define visual adaptation fields in outdoor lighting. The case study consisted of eye-tracking measurements and subjective evaluations of the lighting conditions.



It was found that the eye-fixation areas and locations were around a central area of the road surface in the horizontal level but spread over a wider area in the vertical level. The subjective importance of facial recognition depends on the specific visual tasks at different light levels in a pedestrian way. The results also suggest that further studies using an eye-tracking system could combine eye-fixation data with pupil size and luminance data. This would help in further analysis of visual adaptation fields of the road users.
 
  Address Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Aalto University, Finland  
  Corporate Author Thesis Ph.D. thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor Luo, Wei  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 340  
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Author Kaniewska, P.; Alon, S.; Karako-Lampert, S.; Hoegh-Guldberg, O.; Levy, O. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Signaling cascades and the importance of moonlight in coral broadcast mass spawning Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication eLife Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume 4 Issue Pages e09991  
  Keywords Animals; coral; chronobiology; reproductive strategies; reproductive synchronization; Great Barrier Reef; neurohormones; marine; oceans; invertebrates  
  Abstract Many reef-building corals participate in a mass-spawning event that occurs yearly on the Great Barrier Reef. This coral reproductive event is one of earth's most prominent examples of synchronised behavior, and coral reproductive success is vital to the persistence of coral reef ecosystems. Although several environmental cues have been implicated in the timing of mass spawning, the specific sensory cues that function together with endogenous clock mechanisms to ensure accurate timing of gamete release are largely unknown. Here, we show that moonlight is an important external stimulus for mass spawning synchrony and describe the potential mechanisms underlying the ability of corals to detect environmental triggers for the signaling cascades that ultimately result in gamete release. Our study increases the understanding of reproductive chronobiology in corals and strongly supports the hypothesis that coral gamete release is achieved by a complex array of potential neurohormones and light-sensing molecules.  
  Address Global Change Institute and ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia; oveh(at)uq.edu.au  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher eLife Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2050-084X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1321  
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Author Posudin, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Measurement of Light Pollution Type Book Chapter
  Year 2014 Publication Methods of Measuring Environmental Parameters Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume Chapter 33 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Bortle scale; digital photography; light pollution; portable spectrophotometer; sky quality meter; SQM  
  Abstract Digital photography is based on the conversion of light by sensitive matrix (array of electronic photodetectors) to capture the image which is then digitized and stored as a computer file for further processing and printing. The spectral sensitivity of the cameras is in good agreement with the spectrum of action of the photosensitive hormone melatonin. Digital photography can be used to quantify light pollution acting on the physiology of living organisms. The chapter discusses the principles of spectrophotometry. A portable spectrophotometer for the measurement of light pollution is proposed by Cinzano. It consists of a cooled CCD camera and a small spectrographic head which is equipped with a De Amici prism composed of two external crown prisms and an inner Flint prism. Sky quality meter (SQM) is a portable photometer for measuring sky brightness and for light pollution monitoring. This device collects the light from a wide solid angle.  
  Address Department of Physics, National University of Life and Environmental Sciences, Ukraine  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 359  
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Author Warrant, E.; Oskarsson, M.; Malm, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Remarkable Visual Abilities of Nocturnal Insects: Neural Principles and Bioinspired Night-Vision Algorithms Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Proceedings of the IEEE Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume 102 Issue 10 Pages 1411 - 1426  
  Keywords Animals; Vision  
  Abstract Despite their tiny eyes and brains, nocturnal insects have remarkable visual abilities. Recent work – particularly on fast-flying moths and bees and on ball-rolling dung beetles – has shown that nocturnal insects are able to distinguish colors, to detect faint movements, to learn visual landmarks, to orient to the faint pattern of polarized light produced by the moon, and to navigate using the stars. These impressive visual abilities are the result of exquisitely adapted eyes and visual systems, the product of millions of years of evolution. Even though we are only at the threshold of understanding the neural mechanisms responsible for reliable nocturnal vision, growing evidence suggests that the neural summation of photons in space and time is critically important: even though vision in dim light becomes necessarily coarser and slower, those details that are preserved are seen clearly. These benefits of spatio-temporal summation have obvious implications for dim-light video technologies. In addition to reviewing the visual adaptations of nocturnal insects, we here describe an algorithm inspired by nocturnal visual processing strategies – from amplification of primary image signals to optimized spatio-temporal summation to reduce noise – that dramatically increases the reliability of video collected in dim light, including the preservation of color.  
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  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 376  
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Author Anisimov, V.N.; Vinogradova, I.A.; Panchenko, A.V.; Popovich, I.G.; Zabezhinskii, M.A. url  openurl
  Title Light-at-Night-Induced Circadian Disruption, Cancer and Aging Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Current Aging Science Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume 5 Issue 3 Pages 170-177  
  Keywords Animals; Light-at-night; aging; cancer; cardiovascular diseases; circadian; circadian rhythm; diabetes; disruption; melatonin; shift-work  
  Abstract Light-at-night has become an increasing and essential part of the modern lifestyle and leads to a number of health problems, including excessive body mass index, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and cancer. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Working Group concluded that “shift-work that involves circadian disruption is probably carcinogenic to humans” (Group 2A) [1]. According to the circadian disruption hypothesis, light-at-night might disrupt the endogenous circadian rhythm and specifically suppress nocturnal production of the pineal hormone melatonin and its secretion into the blood. We evaluated the effect of various light/dark regimens on the survival, life span, and spontaneous and chemical carcinogenesis in rodents. Exposure to constant illumination was followed by accelerated aging and enhanced spontaneous tumorigenesis in female CBA and transgenic HER-2/neu mice. In male and female rats maintained at various light/dark regimens (standard 12:12 light/dark [LD], the natural light [NL] of northwestern Russia, constant light [LL], and constant darkness [DD]) from the age of 25 days until natural death, it was found that exposure to NL and LL regimens accelerated age-related switch-off of the estrous function (in females), induced development of metabolic syndrome and spontaneous tumorigenesis, and shortened life span both in male and females rats compared to the standard LD regimen. Melatonin given in nocturnal drinking water prevented the adverse effect of the constant illumination (LL) and natural light (NL) regimens on the homeostasis, life span, and tumor development both in mice and rats. The exposure to the LL regimen accelerated colon carcinogenesis induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) in rats, whereas the treatment with melatonin alleviated the effects of LL. The maintenance of rats at the DD regimen inhibited DMH-induced carcinogenesis. The LL regimen accelerated, whereas the DD regimen inhibited both mammary carcinogenesis induced by N-nitrosomethylurea and transplacental carcinogenesis induced by N-nitrosoethylurea in rats. Treatment with melatonin prevented premature aging and tumorigenesis in rodents. The data found in the literature and our observations suggest that the use of melatonin would be effective for cancer prevention in humans at risk as a result of light pollution.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 377  
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