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Author Bolton, D.; Mayer-Pinto, M.; Clark, G.F.; Dafforn, K.A.; Brassil, W.A.; Becker, A.; Johnston, E.L.
Title Coastal urban lighting has ecological consequences for multiple trophic levels under the sea Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication The Science of the Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Sci Total Environ
Volume 576 Issue Pages 1-9
Keywords Animals; Ecology
Abstract (down) Urban land and seascapes are increasingly exposed to artificial lighting at night (ALAN), which is a significant source of light pollution. A broad range of ecological effects are associated with ALAN, but the changes to ecological processes remain largely unstudied. Predation is a key ecological process that structures assemblages and responds to natural cycles of light and dark. We investigated the effect of ALAN on fish predatory behaviour, and sessile invertebrate prey assemblages. Over 21days fish and sessile assemblages were exposed to 3 light treatments (Day, Night and ALAN). An array of LED spotlights was installed under a wharf to create the ALAN treatments. We used GoPro cameras to film during the day and ALAN treatments, and a Dual frequency IDentification SONar (DIDSON) to film during the night treatments. Fish were most abundant during unlit nights, but were also relatively sedentary. Predatory behaviour was greatest during the day and under ALAN than at night, suggesting that fish are using structures for non-feeding purposes (e.g. shelter) at night, but artificial light dramatically increases their predatory behaviour. Altered predator behaviour corresponded with structural changes to sessile prey assemblages among the experimental lighting treatments. We demonstrate the direct effects of artificial lighting on fish behaviour and the concomitant indirect effects on sessile assemblage structure. Current and future projected use of artificial lights has the potential to significantly affect predator-prey interactions in marine systems by altering habitat use for both predators and prey. However, developments in lighting technology are a promising avenue for mitigation. This is among the first empirical evidence from the marine system on how ALAN can directly alter predation, a fundamental ecosystem process, and have indirect trophic consequences.
Address Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; Sydney Institute of Marine Sciences, Mosman, NSW 2088, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27780095 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1548
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Author Benis, K.; Ferrão, P.
Title Commercial farming within the urban built environment – Taking stock of an evolving field in northern countries Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Global Food Security Abbreviated Journal Global Food Security
Volume 17 Issue Pages 30-37
Keywords Planning
Abstract (down) Urban horticulture has historically contributed to the supply of fresh produce to urban dwellers and has been gaining popularity over the last years in the Global North, with growing awareness of environmental and health concerns. Over the past few years, commercial farms have been emerging in major northern cities, promoting a trend of environmentally friendly food, grown in highly efficient installations on top of or in buildings. This paper presents a scoping study, including: (i) a review of the scientific literature addressing environmental, economic and social aspects of commercial farming in urban contexts; and (ii) a consultation exercise to inform and validate findings from the review, consisting of semi-structured interviews with a few practitioners in the Netherlands. The main findings are: (1) while the recent proliferation of commercial farms in major cities shows that these new modes of urban agricultural production are gaining momentum, establishing their viability as compared to conventional agricultural practices is a challenge when it comes to scalability, resource efficiency, and cost-effectiveness; (2) as it is still a relatively new field, very few studies have been conducted to quantitatively assess the impacts of commercial farming in urban areas; (3) given the complex environmental, economic and social dimensions of urban agriculture, holistic decision support tools could help integrating them in urban areas.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2211-9124 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1843
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Author Manoli, G.; Fatichi, S.; Schlapfer, M.; Yu, K.; Crowther, T.W.; Meili, N.; Burlando, P.; Katul, G.G.; Bou-Zeid, E.
Title Magnitude of urban heat islands largely explained by climate and population Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature
Volume 573 Issue 7772 Pages 55-60
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract (down) Urban heat islands (UHIs) exacerbate the risk of heat-related mortality associated with global climate change. The intensity of UHIs varies with population size and mean annual precipitation, but a unifying explanation for this variation is lacking, and there are no geographically targeted guidelines for heat mitigation. Here we analyse summertime differences between urban and rural surface temperatures (DeltaTs) worldwide and find a nonlinear increase in DeltaTs with precipitation that is controlled by water or energy limitations on evapotranspiration and that modulates the scaling of DeltaTs with city size. We introduce a coarse-grained model that links population, background climate, and UHI intensity, and show that urban-rural differences in evapotranspiration and convection efficiency are the main determinants of warming. The direct implication of these nonlinearities is that mitigation strategies aimed at increasing green cover and albedo are more efficient in dry regions, whereas the challenge of cooling tropical cities will require innovative solutions.
Address Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31485056 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2669
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Author Meng, C.; Dou, Y.
Title Quantifying the Anthropogenic Footprint in Eastern China Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 6 Issue Pages 24337
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract (down) Urban heat island (UHI) is one of the most focuses in urban climate study. The parameterization of the anthropogenic heat (AH) is crucial important in UHI study, but universal method to parameterize the spatial pattern of the AH is lacking now. This paper uses the NOAA DMSP/OLS nighttime light data to parameterize the spatial pattern of the AH. Two experiments were designed and performed to quantify the influences of the AH to land surface temperature (LST) in eastern China and 24 big cities. The annual mean heating caused by AH is up to 1 K in eastern China. This paper uses the relative LST differences rather than the absolute LST differences between the control run and contrast run of common land model (CoLM) to find the drivers. The heating effect of the anthropogenic footprint has less influence on relatively warm and wet cities.
Address Institute of Urban Meteorology, China Meteorological Administration, Beijing, 100089, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27067132 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1415
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Author Sun, Y.; Wang, S.; Wang, Y.
Title Estimating local-scale urban heat island intensity using nighttime light satellite imageries Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Sustainable Cities and Society Abbreviated Journal Sustainable Cities and Society
Volume 57 Issue Pages in press
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract (down) Urban heat island (UHI) effect tends to harm health, increase anthropogenic energy consumption, and water consumption. Some policies targeting UHI mitigation have been implemented for a few years and thus needs to be evaluated for changes or modifications in the future. A low-cost approach to rapidly monitoring UHI intensity variations can assist in evaluating policy implementations. In this study, we proposed a new approach to local-scale UHI intensity estimates by using nighttime light satellite imageries. We explored to what extent UHI intensity could be estimated according to nighttime light intensity at two local scales. We attempted to estimate district-level and neighbourhood-level UHI intensity across London and Paris. As the geography level rises from district to neighbourhood, the capacity of the models explaining the variations of the UHI intensity decreases. Although the possible presence of residual spatial autocorrelation in the conventional regression models applied to geospatial data, most of the studies are likely to neglect this issue when fitting data to models. To remove negative effects of the residual spatial autocorrelation, this study used spatial regression models instead of non-spatial regression models (e.g., OLS models) to estimate UHI intensity. As a result, district-level UHI intensity was successfully estimated according to nighttime light intensity (approximately R2 = 0.7, MAE =1.16 °C, and RMSE =1.74 °C).
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2210-6707 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2849
Permanent link to this record