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Author Aubé, M.; Franchomme-Fossé, L.; Robert-Staehler, P.; Houle, V.
Title Light pollution modeling and detection in a heterogeneous environment: toward a night time aerosol optical depth retrieval method. Type Journal Article
Year 2005 Publication Proceedings of SPIE 2005 -- Volume 5890, San Diego, California, USA. Abbreviated Journal
Volume 5890 Issue Pages
Keywords Skyglow; aerosol optical depth;  remote sensing; light pollution; artificial skyglow
Abstract (down) Tracking the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) is of particular importance in monitoring aerosol contributions to global radiative forcing. Until now, the two standard techniques used for retrieving AOD were; (i) sun photometry, and (ii) satellite based approaches, such as based DDV (Dense Dark Vegetation) inversion algorithms. These methods are only available for use during daylight time since they are based on direct or indirect observation of sunlight. Few attempts have been made to measure AOD behaviour at night. One such method uses spectrally ­ calibrated stars as reference targets but the number of available stars is limited. This is especially true for urban sites where artificial lighting hides most  of these stars. In this research, we  attempt  to provide an alternate method, one  which exploits artificial sky glow or light pollution. This methodology links a 3D light pollution model with in situ light pollution measurements. The basic idea is to adjust an AOD value into the model in order to fit measured light pollution. This method requires an accurate model that includes spatial heterogeneity in lighting angular geometry, in lighting spectral dependence, in ground spectral reflectance and in topography. This model, named ILLUMINA, computes 1st and 2nd order molecular and aerosol scattering, as well as aerosol absorption. These model features represent major improvements to previous light pollution models. Therefore, new possibilities for light pollution studies will arise, many of which are of particular interest to the astronomical community. In this paper we will present a first sensitive study applied to the ILLUMINA model.
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Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 554
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Author Gaughan, A. E., Oda, T., Sorichetta, A., Stevens, F. R., Bondarenko, M., Bun, R., Krauser, L., Yetman, G., & Nghiem, S. V.
Title Evaluating nighttime lights and population distribution as proxies for mapping anthropogenic CO2 emission in Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Research Communications Abbreviated Journal
Volume 1 Issue 9 Pages 091006
Keywords Remote Sensing; greenhouse gas emissions; GHG; Asia; Vietnam; Cambodia; Laos; nighttime light
Abstract (down) Tracking spatiotemporal changes in GHG emissions is key to successful implementation of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). And while emission inventories often provide a robust tool to track emission trends at the country level, subnational emission estimates are often not reported or reports vary in robustness as the estimates are often dependent on the spatial modeling approach and ancillary data used to disaggregate the emission inventories. Assessing the errors and uncertainties of the subnational emission estimates is fundamentally challenging due to the lack of physical measurements at the subnational level. To begin addressing the current performance of modeled gridded CO2 emissions, this study compares two common proxies used to disaggregate CO2 emission estimates. We use a known gridded CO2 model based on satellite-observed nighttime light (NTL) data (Open Source Data Inventory for Anthropogenic CO2, ODIAC) and a gridded population dataset driven by a set of ancillary geospatial data. We examine the association at multiple spatial scales of these two datasets for three countries in Southeast Asia: Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos and characterize the spatiotemporal similarities and differences for 2000, 2005, and 2010. We specifically highlight areas of potential uncertainty in the ODIAC model, which relies on the single use of NTL data for disaggregation of the non-point emissions estimates. Results show, over time, how a NTL-based emissions disaggregation tends to concentrate CO2 estimates in different ways than population-based estimates at the subnational level. We discuss important considerations in the disconnect between the two modeled datasets and argue that the spatial differences between data products can be useful to identify areas affected by the errors and uncertainties associated with the NTL-based downscaling in a region with uneven urbanization rates.
Address University of Louisville, Department of Geography and Geosciences, Louisville, KY, United States of America; ae.gaughan(at)louisville.edu
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2727
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Author Levin, N.; Ali, S.; Crandall, D.
Title Utilizing remote sensing and big data to quantify conflict intensity: The Arab Spring as a case study Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Applied Geography Abbreviated Journal Applied Geography
Volume 94 Issue Pages 1-17
Keywords Remote Sensing; Society; Human Health
Abstract (down) Tracking global and regional conflict zones requires spatially explicit information in near real-time. Here, we examined the potential of remote sensing time-series data (night lights) and big data (data mining of news events and Flickr photos) for monitoring and understanding crisis development and refugee flows. We used the recent Arab Spring as a case study, and examined temporal trends in monthly time series of variables which we hypothesized to indicate conflict intensity, covering all Arab countries. Both Flickr photos and night-time lights proved as sensitive indicators for loss of economic and human capital, and news items from the Global Data on Events, Location and Tone (GDELT) project on fight events were positively correlated with actual deaths from conflicts. We propose that big data and remote sensing datasets have potential to provide disaggregated and timely data on conflicts where official statistics are lacking, offering an effective approach for monitoring geopolitical and environmental changes on Earth.
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ISSN 0143-6228 ISBN Medium
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Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1918
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Author Fotios, S., Price, T
Title Road lighting and accidents: Why lighting is not the only answer Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Lighting Journal Abbreviated Journal
Volume 82 Issue 5 Pages 22-26
Keywords Lighting; Public Safety
Abstract (down) Tony Price and Steve Fotios point out that while road lighting can be a significant counter measure to accidents, and that higher levels might help, the presence of road lighting does not guarantee all accidents will be avoided.
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Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1767
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Author Ciriminna, R.; Meneguzzo, F.; Albanese, L.; Pagliaro, M.
Title Solar street lighting: a key technology en route to sustainability: Solar street lighting technology for sustainability Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Energy and Environment Abbreviated Journal WIREs Energy Environ
Volume 6 Issue 2 Pages in press
Keywords Lighting, Energy
Abstract (down) Today’s solar street LED lights are able to provide reliable, quality lighting both in developing and developed countries, thereby reducing light poverty and the economic and environmental costs of electric outdoor lighting. Rapid technical innovation and dramatic price reduction in the LED, PV module, and battery components, which has occurred in the last 5 years, will accelerate the penetration of solar street LED lights across the world. Applications will not be limited to countries with significant insolation only but will extend to Northern regions as well. This study provides a critical overview of a technology that will play an important role en route to global sustainability.
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ISSN 2041-8396 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1487
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