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Author Li, X.T., Chen, B., Wang, H.J., Zheng, G., Yang, D., Miao, X.Y., & Xu, C.
Title Effects of urban nighttime light on the growth of Cinnamomum camphora Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Ying Yong Sheng Tai Xue Bao Abbreviated Journal
Volume 30 Issue 7 Pages 2284-2290
Keywords Plants
Abstract (down) To understand the effects of urban artificial nighttime light on the growth of evergreen trees, we conducted a field investigation in a typical urban street planted with Cinnamomum camphora (a common evergreen street tree species in eastern China) in the Nanjing City, China. Along the street, trees from two types of growing locations with contrasting distances from the street lamp (just under the lamp vs. between two adjacent lamps) were selected. The growth-related plant functional traits were measured and compared. The results showed that trees grown under the lamp had a mean diameter at beast height (DBH) of 16.8 cm, current-year branch productivity (CBP) of 309.4 g·m-2, current-year leaf productivity (CLP) of 241.5 g·m-2, and leaf relative chlorophyll content (LCC) of 34.6 SPAD. Trees grown between lamps had a mean DBH of 15.5 cm, CBP of 273.4 g·m-2, CLP of 212.8 g·m-2, and LCC of 33.1 SPAD. DBH, CBP, CLP and LCC of the trees under the lamp were significantly higher than those between lamps. There was no significant difference in specific leaf area between trees from the two locations. Our results suggested that urban artificial nighttime light could promote the growth of C. camphora, and alter sunlight-determined characteristics of canopy growth vigor.

为了解常绿乔木对城市夜间灯光的生长响应,以华东地区典型常绿行道树种香樟为对象,研究南京市一条典型道路上近灯处(路灯正下方)和远灯处(两相邻路灯中间位置)生长区位的夜间光照强度差异性对香樟生长性状的影响.结果表明: 近灯处香樟的平均胸径为16.8 cm,当年生小枝总生产力为309.4 g·m-2,当年生叶片生产力为241.5 g·m-2,叶片相对叶绿素含量为34.6 SPAD.远灯处香樟的平均胸径为15.5 cm,当年生小枝总生产力为273.4 g·m-2,当年生叶片生产力为212.8 g·m-2,叶片相对叶绿素含量为33.1 SPAD.近灯处香樟的平均胸径、当年生小枝总生产力、当年生叶片生产力及叶片相对叶绿素含量均显著高于远灯处.两处树木间比叶面积没有显著差异.夜间灯光的补充照明促进了近灯处香樟的生长,并改变了树冠生长对阳光的响应特征.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Chinese Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2728
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Author Ou, J.; Liu, X.; Wang, S.; Xie, R.; Li, X.
Title Investigating the differentiated impacts of socioeconomic factors and urban forms on CO2 emissions: Empirical evidence from Chinese cities of different developmental levels Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Cleaner Production Abbreviated Journal Journal of Cleaner Production
Volume 226 Issue Pages 601-614
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract (down) To reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions attributed widely to human activities, previous studies have paid great attention to the relationships between socioeconomic development, urban forms and CO2 emissions in cities, and provided relevant emission mitigation policies through the effective urban spatial planning. However, whether and how different features of urban forms (such as compactness) affecting the levels of CO2 emissions is still debatable, specifically considering the different development levels of the cities. Therefore, this study is to synthetically explore how socioeconomic factors and urban forms work together to affect CO2 emissions with the consideration of differences in development levels of five city tiers in China. First, CO2 emissions in each city were derived from provincial energy statistics, radiance-calibrated nighttime light imageries, and population distribution data based on a disaggregating model. Then, a set of variables representing socioeconomic factors and urban forms were acquired from the city statistics and land use data, respectively. After obtaining the balanced dataset of these five city tiers from 1995 to 2015, the panel data analysis was finally applied to evaluate the consequences of socioeconomic factors and urban forms on CO2 emissions under different development stages. The estimation results show that the economic development, population growth, and urban land expansion are important factors that accelerating CO2 emissions in all the city tiers. Besides, irregular or fragmented structures of urban land use could result in more CO2 emissions due to the increase in potential transportation requirements in all the city tiers. Notably, an increasing concentrated pattern in the urban core is found to increase CO2 emissions in the tier-one cities, but to promote the reduction of CO2 emissions in other four city tiers. The urban spatial development with a compact and multiple-nuclei pattern is suggested to be closely linked with a lower level of CO2 emissions. Such results highlight the importance of a city's development level for decision-making involving the mitigation of CO2 emissions, and provide scientific support for building a low-carbon city from the perspective of both socioeconomic development and urban spatial planning.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 0959-6526 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2325
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Author Kocifaj, M.
Title A numerical experiment on light pollution from distant sources: Light pollution from distant sources Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal MNRAS
Volume 415 Issue 4 Pages 3609-3615
Keywords scattering; atmospheric effects; light pollution; methods: numerical; skyglow; modeling
Abstract (down) To predict the light pollution of the night-time sky realistically over any location or measuring point on the ground presents quite a difficult calculation task. Light pollution of the local atmosphere is caused by stray light, light loss or reflection of artificially illuminated ground objects or surfaces such as streets, advertisement boards or building interiors. Thus it depends on the size, shape, spatial distribution, radiative pattern and spectral characteristics of many neighbouring light sources. The actual state of the atmospheric environment and the orography of the surrounding terrain are also relevant. All of these factors together influence the spectral sky radiance/luminance in a complex manner. Knowledge of the directional behaviour of light pollution is especially important for the correct interpretation of astronomical observations. From a mathematical point of view, the light noise or veil luminance of a specific sky element is given by a superposition of scattered light beams. Theoretical models that simulate light pollution typically take into account all ground-based light sources, thus imposing great requirements on CPU and MEM. As shown in this paper, a contribution of distant sources to the light pollution might be essential under specific conditions of low turbidity and/or Garstang-like radiative patterns. To evaluate the convergence of the theoretical model, numerical experiments are made for different light sources, spectral bands and atmospheric conditions. It is shown that in the worst case the integration limit is approximately 100 km, but it can be significantly shortened for light sources with cosine-like radiative patterns.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 267
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Author Lin, Y.; Liu, Y.; Sun, Y.; Zhu, X.; Lai, J.; Heynderickx, I.
Title Model predicting discomfort glare caused by LED road lights Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Optics Express Abbreviated Journal Opt. Express
Volume 22 Issue 15 Pages 18056
Keywords LED; LED lighting; glare; road safety; traffic
Abstract (down) To model discomfort glare from LED road lighting, the effect of four key variables on perceived glare was explored. These variables were: the average glare source luminance (Lg), the background luminance (Lb), the solid angle of the glare source from the perspective of the viewer; and the angle between the glare source and the line of sight. Based on these four variables 72 different light conditions were simulated in a scaled experimental set-up. Participants were requested to judge the perceived discomfort glare of these light conditions using the deBoer rating scale. All four variables and some of their interactions had indeed a significant effect on the deBoer rating. Based on these findings, we developed a model, and tested its general applicability in various verification experiments, including laboratory conditions as well as real road conditions. This verification proved the validity of the model with a correlation between measured and predicted values as high as 0.87 and a residual deviation of about 1 unit on the deBoer rating scale. These results filled the gap in estimating discomfort glare of LED road lighting and clarified similarities of and differences in discomfort glare between LED and traditional light sources.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1094-4087 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 351
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Author Dominoni, D.M.; Helm, B.; Lehmann, M.; Dowse, H.B.; Partecke, J.
Title Clocks for the city: circadian differences between forest and city songbirds Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Proceedings. Biological Sciences / The Royal Society Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci
Volume 280 Issue 1763 Pages 20130593
Keywords Animals; Circadian Clocks/*physiology; Circadian Rhythm; Cities; *Ecosystem; Light; Male; Songbirds/classification/*physiology; Trees; Urbanization; birds; chronotype; circadian rhythms; light at night; radio-telemetry; urbanization
Abstract (down) To keep pace with progressing urbanization organisms must cope with extensive habitat change. Anthropogenic light and noise have modified differences between day and night, and may thereby interfere with circadian clocks. Urbanized species, such as birds, are known to advance their activity to early morning and night hours. We hypothesized that such modified activity patterns are reflected by properties of the endogenous circadian clock. Using automatic radio-telemetry, we tested this idea by comparing activity patterns of free-living forest and city European blackbirds (Turdus merula). We then recaptured the same individuals and recorded their activity under constant conditions. City birds started their activity earlier and had faster but less robust circadian oscillation of locomotor activity than forest conspecifics. Circadian period length predicted start of activity in the field, and this relationship was mainly explained by fast-paced and early-rising city birds. Although based on only two populations, our findings point to links between city life, chronotype and circadian phenotype in songbirds, and potentially in other organisms that colonize urban habitats, and highlight that urban environments can significantly modify biologically important rhythms in wild organisms.
Address Department of Migration and Immuno-ecology, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Radolfzell 78479, Germany. ddominoni@orn.mpg.de
Corporate Author Thesis
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23740778; PMCID:PMC3774226 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 42
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