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Author Liu, Z.; He, C.; Zhang, Q.; Huang, Q.; Yang, Y.
Title Extracting the dynamics of urban expansion in China using DMSP-OLS nighttime light data from 1992 to 2008 Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Landscape and Urban Planning Abbreviated Journal Landscape and Urban Planning
Volume 106 Issue 1 Pages 62-72
Keywords China; DMSP-OLS; Information extraction; Nighttime stable light; Urban expansion; remote sensing
Abstract (down) Timely and accurate information about the dynamics of urban expansion is vital to reveal the relationships between urban expansion and the ecosystem, to optimize land use patterns, and to promote the effective development of cities in China. Nighttime stable light data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Line-scan System (DMSP-OLS) Nighttime Lights Time Series dataset provide a new source of information that can quickly reveal the dynamics of urban expansion. However, the DMSP-OLS sensor has no on-board calibration, which makes it difficult to directly compare time series data from multiple satellites. This study developed a new method for systematically correcting multi-year multi-satellite nighttime stable lights data and rapidly extracting the dynamics of urban expansion based on this corrected data for China from 1992 to 2008. The results revealed that the proposed method effectively reduced abnormal discrepancy within the nighttime stable light data and improved continuity and comparability. The dynamics of urban expansion in China from 1992 to 2008 were extracted with an average overall accuracy of 82.74% and an average Kappa of 0.40.
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ISSN 0169-2046 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 205
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Author Scheibler, E.; Roschlau, C.; Brodbeck, D.
Title Lunar and temperature effects on activity of free-living desert hamsters (Phodopus roborovskii, Satunin 1903) Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication International Journal of Biometeorology Abbreviated Journal Int J Biometeorol
Volume 58 Issue 8 Pages 1769-1778
Keywords Animals
Abstract (down) Time management of truly wild hamsters was investigated in their natural habitat in Alashan desert, Inner Mongolia, China during summer of 2009, 2010, and 2012. Duration of activity outside their burrows, duration of foraging walks, and nocturnal inside stays were analyzed with the aim to elucidate impact of moon, ambient, and soil temperature. Animal data were determined using radio frequency identification (RFID) technique; for that purpose, individuals were caught in the field and marked with passive transponders. Their burrows were equipped with integrated microchip readers and photosensors for the detection of movements into or out of the burrow. Lunar impact was analyzed based on moon phase (full, waning, new, and waxing moons) and moon disk size. A prolongation of aboveground activity was shown with increasing moon disk size (Spearman rho = 0.237; p = 0.025) which was caused by earlier onsets (rho =-0.161; p = 0.048); additionally, foraging walks took longer (Pearson r = 0.037; p = 0.037). Temperature of different periods of time was analyzed, i.e., mean of whole day, of the activity phase, minimum, and maximum. Moreover, this was done for the current day and the previous 3 days. Overall, increasing ambient and soil temperatures were associated with shortening of activity by earlier offsets of activity and shorter nocturnal stays inside their burrows. Most influential temperatures for activity duration were the maximum ambient temperature, 3 days before (stepwise regression analysis R = 0.499; R (2) = 0.249; F = 7.281; p = 0.013) and soil temperature during activity phase, 1 day before (R = 0.644; R (2) = 0.283; F = 7.458; p = 0.004).
Address Department of Animal Physiology, Biological Institute, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70569, Stuttgart, Germany, elke.scheibler@bio.uni-stuttgart.de
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ISSN 0020-7128 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24408344 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 804
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Author Langbehn, T.; Aksnes, D.; Kaartvedt, S.; Fiksen, Ø.; Jørgensen, C.
Title Light comfort zone in a mesopelagic fish emerges from adaptive behaviour along a latitudinal gradient Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Marine Ecology Progress Series Abbreviated Journal Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser.
Volume 623 Issue Pages 161-174
Keywords Animals; Moonlight
Abstract (down) Throughout the oceans, small fish and other micronekton migrate between daytimedepths of several hundred meters and near-surface waters at night. These diel vertical migrationsof mesopelagic organisms structure pelagic ecosystems through trophic interactions, and are akey element in the biological carbon pump. However, depth distributions and migration ampli-tude vary greatly. Suggested proximate causes of the migration such as oxygen, temperature, andlight often correlate and therefore the causal underpinnings have remained unclear. Using meso-pelagic fishes and the Norwegian Sea as a study system, we developed a dynamic state variablemodel that finds optimal migration patterns that we validate with acoustic observations along alatitudinal gradient. The model describes predation risk and bioenergetics, and maximizes ex -pected energy surplus, a proxy for Darwinian fitness. The model allows us to disentangle the driv-ers of migration and make predictions about depth distribution and related fitness consequencesalong a latitudinal trajectory with strong gradients in environmental drivers and vertical distribu-tion of scattering layers. We show that the model-predicted vertical migration of mesopelagicfishes matches that observed along this transect. For most situations, modelled mesopelagic fishbehaviour can be well described by a light comfort zone near identical to that derived from obser-vations. By selectively keeping light or temperature constant, the model reveals that temperature,in comparison with light, has little effect on depth distribution. We find that water clarity, whichlimits how deeply light can penetrate into the ocean, structures daytime depths, while surfacelight at night controlled the depth of nocturnal ascents.
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ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2598
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Author Foster, J.J.; Smolka, J.; Nilsson, D.-E.; Dacke, M.
Title How animals follow the stars Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Proceedings. Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci
Volume 285 Issue 1871 Pages
Keywords Vision; Animals
Abstract (down) Throughout history, the stars have provided humans with ever more information about our world, enabling increasingly accurate systems of navigation in addition to fuelling some of the greatest scientific controversies. What information animals have evolved to extract from a starry sky and how they do so, is a topic of study that combines the practical and theoretical challenges faced by both astronomers and field biologists. While a number of animal species have been demonstrated to use the stars as a source of directional information, the strategies that these animals use to convert this complex and variable pattern of dim-light points into a reliable 'stellar orientation' cue have been more difficult to ascertain. In this review, we assess the stars as a visual stimulus that conveys directional information, and compare the bodies of evidence available for the different stellar orientation strategies proposed to date. In this context, we also introduce new technologies that may aid in the study of stellar orientation, and suggest how field experiments may be used to characterize the mechanisms underlying stellar orientation.
Address Department of Biology, Lund University, Solvegatan 35, Lund 223 62, Sweden
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29367394 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1802
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Author Bunning, E.; Moser, I.
Title Interference of moonlight with the photoperiodic measurement of time by plants, and their adaptive reaction Type Journal Article
Year 1969 Publication Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Abbreviated Journal Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A
Volume 62 Issue 4 Pages 1018-1022
Keywords Plants; Moonlight
Abstract (down) Threshold values of photoperiodic time-measurements correspond approximately to moonlight intensities. Experiments with Glycine and Euglena reveal that this is also the threshold value for synchronization of the circadian cycle. Saturation of this reaction is reached with 10 lx in 12:12 hr light-dark cycles. Thus, moonlight might disturb time measurement.In Glycine, Arachis, and Trifolium the intensity of the light coming from the moon to the upper surface of the leaf is reduced by circadian leaf movement to values between 5 and 20 per cent (or even less than 5 per cent) of full-moon light intensity. Such a reduction eliminates the disturbing effects of moonlight. This finding indicates that leaf movements have an adaptive value of the kind that Darwin sought to identify. It also indicates that the behavior of the upper leaf epidermis as a “sense organ for light”(13) has an adaptive value.In the short-day plants Perilla ocymoides and Chenopodium amaranticolor, a specific photoperiodic phenomenon was found that counteracts the disturbing effect of moonlight. Here light intensities similar to those of moonlight, introduced during the night, promote flowering instead of inhibiting it.
Address Institute Of Biology, University Of Tubingen, Germany
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ISSN 0027-8424 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:16591742; PMCID:PMC223607 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3035
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