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Author Yadav, G.; Malik, S.; Rani, S.; Kumar, V.
Title Role of light wavelengths in synchronization of circadian physiology in songbirds Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Physiology & Behavior Abbreviated Journal Physiol Behav
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Activity; Animals; Bunting; Cortisol; Light wavelength; Melatonin; Weaver bird
Abstract (down) This study investigated whether at identical duration and equal energy level birds presented with short (450nm; blue, B) and long (640nm; red, R) light wavelengths would differentially interpret them and exhibit wavelength-dependent circadian behavioral and physiological responses, despite the difference in their breeding latitudes. Temperate migratory blackheaded buntings (Emberiza melanocephala) and subtropical non-migratory Indian weaverbirds (Ploceus philippinus) initially entrained to 12h light:12h darkness (12L:12D; L=0.33muM/m2/s, D=0muM/m2/s) in two groups of each, groups 1 and 2, were subjected to constant light (LL, 0.33muM/m2/s), which rendered them arrhythmic in the activity behavior. They were then exposed for about two weeks each to 12B:12R and 12R:12B (group 1) or 12R:12B and 12B:12R (group 2) at 0.33muM/m2/s light energy level. Blue and red light periods were interpreted as the day and night, respectively, with activity and no-activity in non-migratory weaverbirds or activity and intense activity (Zugunruhe, migratory night restlessness) in the migratory buntings. Consistent with this, plasma melatonin levels under B:R, not R:B, light cycle were low and high in blue and red light periods, respectively. A similar diurnal pattern was absent in the cortisol levels, however. These results show an important role of light wavelengths in synchronization of the circadian clock governed behavior and physiology to the photoperiodic environment, and suggest that photoperiodic timing might be a conserved physiological adaptation in many more birds, regardless of the difference in breeding latitudes, than has been generally envisaged.
Address DST-IRHPA Centre for Excellence in Biological Rhythms Research, Department of Zoology, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007, India. Electronic address: drvkumar11@yahoo.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0031-9384 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:25536387 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1080
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Author Nwosu, L.C.; Nwosu, L.K.
Title Influence of Type of Electric Bright Light on the Attraction of the African Giant Water Bug, Lethocerus indicus (Hemiptera: Belostomatidae) Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Psyche: A Journal of Entomology Abbreviated Journal Psyche: A Journal of Entomology
Volume 2012 Issue Pages 1-4
Keywords insects; bugs; African giant water bug; Lethocerus indicus; Hemiptera; Belostomatidae
Abstract (down) This study investigated the influence of type of electric bright light (produced by fluorescent light tube and incandescent light bulb) on the attraction of the African giant water bug, Lethocerus indicus (Hemiptera: Belostomatidae). Four fluorescent light tubes of 15 watts each, producing white-coloured light and four incandescent light bulbs of 60 watts each, producing yellow-coloured light, but both producing the same amount of light, were varied and used for the experiments. Collections of bugs at experimental house were done at night between the hours of 8.30 pm and 12 mid-night on daily basis for a period of four months per experiment in the years 2008 and 2009. Lethocerus indicus whose presence in any environment has certain implications was the predominant belostomatid bug in the area. Use of incandescent light bulbs in 2009 significantly attracted more Lethocerus indicus 103 (74.6%) than use of fluorescent light tubes 35 (25.41%) in 2008 [

&#119875; < 0 . 0 5

;

&#119875; ( &#119885; > 4 . 9 2 ) = 0 . 0 0 0 1

]. However, bug’s attraction to light source was not found sex dependent [

&#119875; > 0 . 0 5

;

&#119875;

(

&#119885; > 0 . 1 8 ) = 0 . 4 2 8 6

and

&#119885; > 0 . 2 8 = 0 . 3 8 9 7

]. Therefore, this study recommends the use of fluorescent light by households, campgrounds, and other recreational centres that are potentially exposed to the nuisance of the giant water bugs. Otherwise, incandescent light bulbs should be used when it is desired to attract the presence of these aquatic bugs either for food or scientific studies.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0033-2615 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 118
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Author Nagare, R.; Plitnick, B.; Figueiro, M.
Title Effect of exposure duration and light spectra on nighttime melatonin suppression in adolescents and adults Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research & Technology
Volume 51 Issue 4 Pages 530-543
Keywords Human Health
Abstract (down) This study investigated how light exposure duration affects melatonin suppression, a well-established marker of circadian phase, and whether adolescents (13–18 years) are more sensitive to short-wavelength (blue) light than adults (32–51 years). Twenty-four participants (12 adolescents, 12 adults) were exposed to three lighting conditions during successive 4-h study nights that were separated by at least one week. In addition to a dim light (<5 lux) control, participants were exposed to two light spectra (warm (2700 K) and cool (5600 K)) delivering a circadian stimulus of 0.25 at eye level. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed a significant main effect of exposure duration, indicating that a longer duration exposure suppressed melatonin to a greater degree. The analysis further revealed a significant main effect of spectrum and a significant interaction between spectrum and participant age. For the adolescents, but not the adults, melatonin suppression was significantly greater after exposure to the 5600 K intervention (43%) compared to the 2700 K intervention (29%), suggesting an increased sensitivity to short-wavelength radiation. These results will be used to extend the model of human circadian phototransduction to incorporate factors such as exposure duration and participant age to better predict effective circadian stimulus.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1821
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Author Chen, X.; Nordhaus, W.D.
Title VIIRS Nighttime Lights in the Estimation of Cross-Sectional and Time-Series GDP Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 11 Issue 9 Pages 1057
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract (down) This study extends previous applications of DMSP OLS nighttime lights data to examine the usefulness of newer VIIRS lights in the estimation of economic activity. Focusing on both US states and metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs), we found that the VIIRS lights are more useful in predicting cross-sectional GDP than predicting time-series GDP data. This result is similar to previous findings for DMSP OLS nighttime lights. Additionally, the present analysis shows that high-resolution VIIRS lights provide a better prediction for MSA GDP than for state GDP, which suggests that lights may be more closely related to urban sectors than rural sectors. The results also indicate the importance of considering biases that may arise from different aggregations (the modifiable areal unit problems, MAUP) in applications of nighttime lights in understanding socioeconomic phenomenon.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2495
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Author Romeo, S. et al.
Title Bright light exposure reduces TH-positive dopamine neurons: implications of light pollution in Parkinson's disease epidemiology Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal
Volume 3 Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; Parkinson's disease; Cell death in the nervous system; Neural ageing; Risk factors
Abstract (down) This study explores the effect of continuous exposure to bright light on neuromelanin formation and dopamine neuron survival in the substantia nigra. Twenty-one days after birth, Sprague–Dawley albino rats were divided into groups and raised under different conditions of light exposure. At the end of the irradiation period, rats were sacrificed and assayed for neuromelanin formation and number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons in the substantia nigra. The rats exposed to bright light for 20 days or 90 days showed a relatively greater number of neuromelanin-positive neurons. Surprisingly, TH-positive neurons decreased progressively in the substantia nigra reaching a significant 29% reduction after 90 days of continuous bright light exposure. This decrease was paralleled by a diminution of dopamine and its metabolite in the striatum. Remarkably, in preliminary analysis that accounted for population density, the age and race adjusted Parkinson's disease prevalence significantly correlated with average satellite-observed sky light pollution.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 382
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