|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Romeo, S. et al.
Title Bright light exposure reduces TH-positive dopamine neurons: implications of light pollution in Parkinson's disease epidemiology Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal
Volume 3 Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; Parkinson's disease; Cell death in the nervous system; Neural ageing; Risk factors
Abstract (down) This study explores the effect of continuous exposure to bright light on neuromelanin formation and dopamine neuron survival in the substantia nigra. Twenty-one days after birth, Sprague–Dawley albino rats were divided into groups and raised under different conditions of light exposure. At the end of the irradiation period, rats were sacrificed and assayed for neuromelanin formation and number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons in the substantia nigra. The rats exposed to bright light for 20 days or 90 days showed a relatively greater number of neuromelanin-positive neurons. Surprisingly, TH-positive neurons decreased progressively in the substantia nigra reaching a significant 29% reduction after 90 days of continuous bright light exposure. This decrease was paralleled by a diminution of dopamine and its metabolite in the striatum. Remarkably, in preliminary analysis that accounted for population density, the age and race adjusted Parkinson's disease prevalence significantly correlated with average satellite-observed sky light pollution.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 382
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chen, X.
Title Nighttime Lights and Population Migration: Revisiting Classic Demographic Perspectives with an Analysis of Recent European Data Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 12 Issue 1 Pages 169
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract (down) This study examines whether the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) nighttime lights can be used to predict population migration in small areas in European Union (EU) countries. The analysis uses the most current data measured at the smallest administrative unit in 18 EU countries provided by the European Commission. The ordinary least squares regression model shows that, compared to population size and gross domestic product (GDP), lights data are another useful predictor. The predicting power of lights is similar to population but it is much stronger than GDP per capita. For most countries, regression models with lights can explain 50–90% of variances in small area migrations. The results also show that the annual VIIRS lights (2015–2016) are slightly better predictors for migration population than averaged monthly VIIRS lights (2014–2017), and their differences are more pronounced in high latitude countries. Further, analysis of quadratic models, models with interaction effects and spatial lag, shows the significant effect of lights on migration in the European region. The study concludes that VIIRS nighttime lights hold great potential for studying human migration flow, and further open the door for more widespread application of remote sensing information in studying dynamic demographic processes.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2794
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Clarke, J.A.
Title Moonlight's influence on predator/prey interactions between short-eared owls (Asio flammeus) and deermice (Peromyscus maniculatus) Type Journal Article
Year 1983 Publication Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology Abbreviated Journal Behav Ecol Sociobiol
Volume 13 Issue 3 Pages 205-209
Keywords Animals
Abstract (down) This study examines the effect of moonlight intensity on deermouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) vulnerability to predation by short-eared owls (Asio flammeus).

Three nocturnal light intensities, labeled new moon, quarter moon, and full moon, were simulated in a flight chamber. Deermouse activity was observed and measured by an index of tracking intensity in the chamber's sand floor. The mice were then exposed to predation by a short-eared owl in each light intensity and search time, chase time, capture time, and the number of escapes/chase were measured.

The results reveal the adaptive significance of deermouse activity suppression in full moon light as an anti-predator response. The deermice reduced activity significantly in bright moonlight during the activity phases. During the predation phases, the owls' hunting effectiveness increased as moonlight waxed. The owls required significantly less time to search for and capture the mice as illumination increased.

The costs and benefits to both species are discussed relative to the prey's variation of activity with moonlight intensity.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0340-5443 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 421
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cho, C.-H.; Moon, J.-H.; Yoon, H.-K.; Kang, S.-G.; Geum, D.; Son, G.-H.; Lim, J.-M.; Kim, L.; Lee, E.-I.; Lee, H.-J.
Title Molecular circadian rhythm shift due to bright light exposure before bedtime is related to subthreshold bipolarity Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 6 Issue Pages 31846
Keywords Human Health
Abstract (down) This study examined the link between circadian rhythm changes due to bright light exposure and subthreshold bipolarity. Molecular circadian rhythms, polysomnography, and actigraphy data were studied in 25 young, healthy male subjects, divided into high and low mood disorder questionnaire (MDQ) score groups. During the first 2 days of the study, the subjects were exposed to daily-living light (150 lux) for 4 hours before bedtime. Saliva and buccal cells were collected 5 times a day for 2 consecutive days. During the subsequent 5 days, the subjects were exposed to bright light (1,000 lux), and saliva and buccal cell samples were collected in the same way. Molecular circadian rhythms were analyzed using sine regression. Circadian rhythms of cortisol (F = 16.956, p < 0.001) and relative PER1/ARNTL gene expression (F = 122.1, p < 0.001) showed a delayed acrophase in both groups after bright light exposure. The high MDQ score group showed a significant delay in acrophase compared to the low MDQ score group only in salivary cortisol (F = 8.528, p = 0.008). The high MDQ score group showed hypersensitivity in cortisol rhythm shift after bright light exposure, suggesting characteristic molecular circadian rhythm changes in the high MDQ score group may be related to biological processes downstream from core circadian clock gene expression.
Address Department of Biomedical Science, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27545669 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1513
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Phipps-Nelson, J.; Redman, J.R.; Schlangen, L.J.M.; Rajaratnam, S.M.W.
Title Blue light exposure reduces objective measures of sleepiness during prolonged nighttime performance testing Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 26 Issue 5 Pages 891-912
Keywords Human Health
Abstract (down) This study examined the effects of nocturnal exposure to dim, narrowband blue light (460 nm, approximately 1 lux, 2 microW/cm2), compared to dim broad spectrum (white) ambient light ( approximately 0.2 lux, 0.5 microW/cm2), on subjective and objective indices of sleepiness during prolonged nighttime performance testing. Participants were also exposed to a red light (640 nm, approximately 1 lux, 0.7 microW/cm2) placebo condition. Outcome measures were driving simulator and psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) performance, subjective sleepiness, salivary melatonin, and electroencephalographic (EEG) activity. The study had a repeated-measures design, with three counterbalanced light conditions and a four-week washout period between each condition. Participants (n = 8) maintained a regular sleep-wake schedule for 14 days prior to the approximately 14 h laboratory study, which consisted of habituation to light conditions followed by neurobehavioral performance testing from 21:00 to 08:30 h under modified constant-routine conditions. A neurobehavioral test battery (2.5 h) was presented four times between 21:00 and 08:30 h, with a 30 min break between each. From 23:30 to 05:30 h, participants were exposed to blue or red light, or remained in ambient conditions. Compared to ambient light exposure, blue light exposure suppressed EEG slow wave delta (1.0-4.5 Hz) and theta (4.5-8 Hz) activity and reduced the incidence of slow eye movements. PVT reaction times were significantly faster in the blue light condition, but driving simulator measures, subjective sleepiness, and salivary melatonin levels were not significantly affected by blue light. Red light exposure, as compared to ambient light exposure, reduced the incidence of slow eye movements. The results demonstrate that low-intensity, blue light exposure can promote alertness, as measured by some of the objective indices used in this study, during prolonged nighttime performance testing. Low intensity, blue light exposure has the potential to be applied to situations where it is desirable to increase alertness but not practical or appropriate to use bright light, such as certain occupational settings.
Address School of Psychology, Psychiatry and Psychological Medicine, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:19637049 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2202
Permanent link to this record