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Author Dacke, M.; Baird, E.; Byrne, M.; Scholtz, C.H.; Warrant, E.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dung beetles use the Milky Way for orientation Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol  
  Volume 23 Issue 4 Pages 298-300  
  Keywords Animals; Beetles/*physiology; *Behavior, Animal; Cues; Feces; *Galaxies; Locomotion; Moon; Motor Activity; Orientation/*physiology; *Stars, Celestial; Vision, Ocular/physiology; Milky Way; insects  
  Abstract (down) When the moon is absent from the night sky, stars remain as celestial visual cues. Nonetheless, only birds, seals, and humans are known to use stars for orientation. African ball-rolling dung beetles exploit the sun, the moon, and the celestial polarization pattern to move along straight paths, away from the intense competition at the dung pile. Even on clear moonless nights, many beetles still manage to orientate along straight paths. This led us to hypothesize that dung beetles exploit the starry sky for orientation, a feat that has, to our knowledge, never been demonstrated in an insect. Here, we show that dung beetles transport their dung balls along straight paths under a starlit sky but lose this ability under overcast conditions. In a planetarium, the beetles orientate equally well when rolling under a full starlit sky as when only the Milky Way is present. The use of this bidirectional celestial cue for orientation has been proposed for vertebrates, spiders, and insects, but never proven. This finding represents the first convincing demonstration for the use of the starry sky for orientation in insects and provides the first documented use of the Milky Way for orientation in the animal kingdom.  
  Address Department of Biology, Lund University, 223 62 Lund, Sweden. marie.dacke@biol.lu.se  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23352694 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 116  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Fritsches, K.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Australian Loggerhead sea turtle hatchlings do not avoid yellow Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Marine and Freshwater Behaviour and Physiology Abbreviated Journal Marine and Freshwater Behaviour and Physiology  
  Volume 45 Issue 2 Pages 79-89  
  Keywords Flatback turtle; Natator depressus; animals; reptiles; marine turtles; turtles; Loggerhead turtle; Caretta caretta  
  Abstract (down) When emerging from the nest, sea turtle hatchlings primarily orient using visual stimuli, with light pollution known to disrupt effective sea localization behavior. Previous studies have shown that sea turtle hatchlings respond differently to different wavelengths of light but Loggerhead hatchlings, exclusively among species tested, have a strong aversion to yellow light (at 600 nm). This study repeats these experiments with an Australian population of Loggerhead hatchlings (Caretta caretta) and Flatback hatchlings (Natator depressus). The orientation preference was measured using a modified y-maze set-up with the animals response observed using an infrared camera. This study showed that both Loggerhead and Flatback hatchlings can see and are attracted to light in the ultraviolet waveband (365 nm) and, to a lesser extent to longer wavelengths of 600 nm and above. The surprising finding was that the Loggerhead hatchlings tested here, unlike their conspecifics in Florida, do not show any avoidance to yellow but are attracted to bright lights of wavelength between 365 nm (UV) and 600 nm. This suggests potential differences in the visual behavior among different populations of sea turtles of the same species. No difference was detected in the response of Loggerhead hatchlings to flickering or steady light stimuli.  
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  ISSN 1023-6244 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 75  
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Author Cao, Y.; Zhang, J.; Yang, M.; Guo, B.; Liu, M.; Yang, L.; Qu, J.; Gao, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Analysis of Lighting Changes in the Tourist City Edogawa Using Nighttime Light Data Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of the Indian Society of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal J Indian Soc Remote Sens  
  Volume 46 Issue 10 Pages 1617-1623  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract (down) When assessing remote sensing data, nighttime light data have shortcomings that can be attributed to sensor limitations and the influence of the natural environment. Signal leakage errors in nighttime light data were identified in this study. A regression model was created to reduce signal leakage error by selecting sampling points in coastal area. Lighting variations in Edogawa between 2008 and 2013 were compared based on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program’s nighttime light data. The lighting variation characteristics in Edogawa from 1992 to 2012 at 5-year intervals were also analyzed. The results show that the 2002 FIFA World Cup held in Japan led Edogawa’s light digital number values to peak in 2002. The annual Edogawa lighting changes from 2007 to 2013 were also explored. The 2008 global financial crisis led to the lowest compounded night light index and average digital number in Edogawa during these 7 years.  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN 0255-660X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2079  
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Author Straka, T.M.; Lentini, P.E.; Lumsden, L.F.; Wintle, B.A.; van der Ree, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Urban bat communities are affected by wetland size, quality, and pollution levels Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Ecology and Evolution Abbreviated Journal Ecol Evol  
  Volume 6 Issue 14 Pages 4761-4774  
  Keywords Ecology, Animals  
  Abstract (down) Wetlands support unique biota and provide important ecosystem services. These services are highly threatened due to the rate of loss and relative rarity of wetlands in most landscapes, an issue that is exacerbated in highly modified urban environments. Despite this, critical ecological knowledge is currently lacking for many wetland-dependent taxa, such as insectivorous bats, which can persist in urban areas if their habitats are managed appropriately. Here, we use a novel paired landscape approach to investigate the role of wetlands in urban bat conservation and examine local and landscape factors driving bat species richness and activity. We acoustically monitored bat activity at 58 urban wetlands and 35 nonwetland sites (ecologically similar sites without free-standing water) in the greater Melbourne area, southeastern Australia. We analyzed bat species richness and activity patterns using generalized linear mixed-effects models. We found that the presence of water in urban Melbourne was an important driver of bat species richness and activity at a landscape scale. Increasing distance to bushland and increasing levels of heavy metal pollution within the waterbody also negatively influenced bat richness and individual species activity. Areas with high levels of artificial night light had reduced bat species richness, and reduced activity for all species except those adapted to urban areas, such as the White-striped free-tailed bat (Austronomus australis). Increased surrounding tree cover and wetland size had a positive effect on bat species richness. Our findings indicate that wetlands form critical habitats for insectivorous bats in urban environments. Large, unlit, and unpolluted wetlands flanked by high tree cover in close proximity to bushland contribute most to the richness of the bat community. Our findings clarify the role of wetlands for insectivorous bats in urban areas and will also allow for the preservation, construction, and management of wetlands that maximize conservation outcomes for urban bats and possibly other wetland-dependent and nocturnal fauna.  
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  ISSN 2045-7758 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1499  
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Author Rowse, E.G.; Harris, S.; Jones, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Switch from Low-Pressure Sodium to Light Emitting Diodes Does Not Affect Bat Activity at Street Lights Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 11 Issue 3 Pages e0150884  
  Keywords Animals; bats; England; United Kingdom; low-pressure sodium; LPS; LED; LED lighting; ecology; urban ecology; Feeding Behavior  
  Abstract (down) We used a before-after-control-impact paired design to examine the effects of a switch from low-pressure sodium (LPS) to light emitting diode (LED) street lights on bat activity at twelve sites across southern England. LED lights produce broad spectrum 'white' light compared to LPS street lights that emit narrow spectrum, orange light. These spectral differences could influence the abundance of insects at street lights and thereby the activity of the bats that prey on them. Most of the bats flying around the LPS lights were aerial-hawking species, and the species composition of bats remained the same after the switch-over to LED. We found that the switch-over from LPS to LED street lights did not affect the activity (number of bat passes), or the proportion of passes containing feeding buzzes, of those bat species typically found in close proximity to street lights in suburban environments in Britain. This is encouraging from a conservation perspective as many existing street lights are being, or have been, switched to LED before the ecological consequences have been assessed. However, lighting of all spectra studied to date generally has a negative impact on several slow-flying bat species, and LED lights are rarely frequented by these 'light-intolerant' bat species.  
  Address School of Biological Sciences, Life Sciences Building, University of Bristol, 24 Tyndall Avenue, Bristol, BS8 1TQ, United Kingdom; liz.rowse(at)bristol.ac.uk  
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  Publisher PLOS Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27008274 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1403  
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