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Author Nang, E.E.K.; Abuduxike, G.; Posadzki, P.; Divakar, U.; Visvalingam, N.; Nazeha, N.; Dunleavy, G.; Christopoulos, G.I.; Soh, C.-K.; Jarbrink, K.; Soljak, M.; Car, J.
Title Review of the potential health effects of light and environmental exposures in underground workplaces Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Tunnelling and Underground Space Technology Abbreviated Journal Tunnelling and Underground Space Technology
Volume 84 Issue Pages 201-209
Keywords Human Health; Review
Abstract (down) Underground workplaces are an important element in modern urban planning. As a result, an increasing but unquantified proportion of the population is being regularly exposed to them. We narratively reviewed the literature on the range of possible environmental exposures, and the possible health effects, to identify future research directions. There is a large but mainly observational research literature on likely underground exposures, including effects of artificial lighting, shift working and light at night on circadian disruptions and associated health effects. There are five studies comparing underground and aboveground environments. Shift working, artificial lighting and poor sleep quality leading to circadian disruption is one physiologic pathway. Working underground may increase exposure to these risks, and may also be associated with vitamin D deficiency, sick building syndrome, excessive noise, radon exposure, and negative psychological effects. In order to plan appropriate interventions, we need to expand our knowledge of the health effects of underground environments. Larger and longer-term studies are required to measure a range of human factors, environmental exposures and confounders. Controlled trials with health economic analyses of new lighting technologies are also required.
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0886-7798 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2112
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Author Bará, S.; Rodríguez-Arós, Á.; Pérez, M.; Tosar, B.; Lima, R.; Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Zamorano, J.
Title Estimating the relative contribution of streetlights, vehicles, and residential lighting to the urban night sky brightness Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Res & Tech
Volume Issue October 2018 Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing; traffic; Roadway lighting
Abstract (down) Under stable atmospheric conditions the brightness of the urban sky varies throughout the night following the time course of the anthropogenic emissions of light. Different types of artificial light sources (e.g. streetlights, residential, and vehicle lights) have specific time signatures, and this feature makes it possible to estimate the amount of brightness contributed by each of them. Our approach is based on transforming the time representation of the zenithal night sky brightness into a modal expansion in terms of the time signatures of the different sources of light. The modal coefficients, and hence the absolute and relative contributions of each type of source, can be estimated by means of a linear least squares fit. A practical method for determining the time signatures of different contributing sources is also described, based on wide-field time-lapse photometry of the urban nightscape. Our preliminary results suggest that, besides the dominant streetlight contribution, artificial light leaking out of the windows of residential buildings may account for a significant share of the time-varying part of the zenithal night sky brightness at the measurement locations, whilst the contribution of the vehicle lights seems to be significantly smaller.
Address Área de Óptica, Dept. Física Aplicada, Facultade de Óptica e Optometría, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela 15782, Galicia, Spain. salva.bara(at)usc.es
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher SAGE Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2052
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Author Jin-Joo Lee, Seong-Sik Yoo, Ho-Seok Kang, Dong-Hee Kim, Jin-Ho Nam, Hyun-Ji Kim, Hoon Kim
Title A Research on Visual Performance at Different Ages Depending on Color Temperature of Headlights Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Journal of the Korean Institute of Illuminating and Electrical Installation Engineers Abbreviated Journal
Volume 31 Issue 8 Pages 40-48
Keywords Lighting
Abstract (down) Under night-time driving conditions, both cones and rods in eye’s retina simultaneously act to influence mesopic vision in two areas: central and peripheral visions. However, as people age, the amount of light received as well as the color temperature perceived by the human eyes also change. This research, through simulations and scaled down experiments with various headlight color temperatures and two levels of fixed brightness, deals with differences in ability to detect and identify obstacles by the subjects in their 20’s and 50’s.

According to the results obtained from the experiments on peripheral vision, subjects in their 20’s detected the obstacles more quickly at the combined color temperature of 3,000K+4,500K than at the single color temperature of 4,500K, and likewise at 3,000K+5,500K than at 5,500K; this tendency was significantly more noticeable for the subjects in their 50’s. As for the central vision, the results showed that there were no significant differences due to color temperature between the subjects in their 20’s and those in their 50’s. Moreover, the landolt ring experiment conducted under low luminance yielded higher percentage of correct answers at combined color temperatures.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1743
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Author Mège, P.; Ödeen, A.; Théry, M.; Picard, D.; Secondi, J.
Title Partial Opsin Sequences Suggest UV-Sensitive Vision is Widespread in Caudata Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Evolutionary Biology Abbreviated Journal Evol. Biol.
Volume Issue Pages 1-10
Keywords Animals; Caudata; amphibians; ultraviolet; ultraviolet vision; opsin; photobiology; SWS1; Paralog gene; Tuning site; Nocturnal species; Sliding window; Ka/Ks
Abstract (down) Ultraviolet (UV) vision exists in several animal groups. Intuitively, one would expect this trait to be favoured in species living in bright environments, where UV light is the most present. However, UV sensitivity, as deduced from sequences of UV photoreceptors and/or ocular media transmittance, is also present in nocturnal species, raising questions about the selective pressure maintaining this perceptual ability. Amphibians are among the most nocturnal vertebrates but their visual ecology remains poorly understood relative to other groups. Perhaps because many of these species breed in environments that filter out a large part of UV radiation, physiological and behavioural studies of UV sensitivity in this group are scarce. We investigated the extent of UV vision in Caudata, the order of amphibians with the most nocturnal habits. We could recover sequences of the UV sensitive SWS1 opsin in 40 out of 58 species, belonging to 6 families. In all of these species, the evidence suggests the presence of functional SWS1 opsins under purifying selection, potentially allowing UV vision. Interestingly, most species whose opsin genes failed to amplify exhibited particular ecological features that could drive the loss of UV vision. This likely wide distribution of functional UV photoreceptors in Caudata sheds a new light on the visual ecology of amphibians and questions the function of UV vision in nocturnal animal species.
Address GECCO, Université d’Angers, 2 Bd Lavoisier, 49045, Angers, France; pascal.mege(at)gmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0071-3260 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1299
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Author Rakshit, K.; Thomas, A.P.; Matveyenko, A.V.
Title Does disruption of circadian rhythms contribute to beta-cell failure in type 2 diabetes? Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Current Diabetes Reports Abbreviated Journal Curr Diab Rep
Volume 14 Issue 4 Pages 474
Keywords *epidemiology; diabetes; Type 2 diabetes; beta cell; T2DM; artificial light; light exposure; circadian disruption
Abstract (down) Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a complex metabolic disease characterized by the loss of beta-cell secretory function and mass. The pathophysiology of beta-cell failure in T2DM involves a complex interaction between genetic susceptibilities and environmental risk factors. One environmental condition that is gaining greater appreciation as a risk factor for T2DM is the disruption of circadian rhythms (eg, shift-work and sleep loss). In recent years, circadian disruption has become increasingly prevalent in modern societies and consistently shown to augment T2DM susceptibility (partly mediated through its effects on pancreatic beta-cells). Since beta-cell failure is essential for development of T2DM, we will review current work from epidemiologic, clinical, and animal studies designed to gain insights into the molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying the predisposition to beta-cell failure associated with circadian disruption. Elucidating the role of circadian clocks in regulating beta-cell health will add to our understanding of T2DM pathophysiology and may contribute to the development of novel therapeutic and preventative approaches.
Address Larry L. Hillblom Islet Research Center, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, University of California Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, 900A Weyburn Place, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1534-4827 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24532160; PMCID:PMC3988110 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 320
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