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Author Levin, N.; Ali, S.; Crandall, D.; Kark, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title World Heritage in danger: Big data and remote sensing can help protect sites in conflict zones Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Global Environmental Change Abbreviated Journal Global Environmental Change  
  Volume 55 Issue Pages 97-104  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract (down) World Heritage sites provide a key mechanism for protecting areas of universal importance. However, fifty-four UNESCO sites are currently listed as “In Danger”, with 40% of these located in the Middle East. Since 2010 alone, thirty new sites were identified as under risk globally. We combined big-data and remote sensing to examine whether they can effectively be used to identify danger to World Heritage in near real-time. We found that armed-conflicts substantially threaten both natural- and cultural-heritage listed sites. Other major risks include poor management and development (globally), poaching (Africa mostly) and deforestation (tropics), yet conflict is the most prominent threat. We show that news-mining of big-data on conflicts and remote sensing of nights-lights enabled us to identify conflict afflicted areas in near real-time. These findings provide a crucial avenue for developing a global transparent early-warning system before irreversible damage to world heritage takes place.  
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  ISSN 0959-3780 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2279  
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Author Rea, M.; Skinner, N.; Bullough, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Novel Barricade Warning Light System Using Wireless Communications Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication SAE Technical Paper 2018-01-5036 Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume In press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Lighting; Safety  
  Abstract (down) Workers in construction and transportation sectors are at increased risk for work-related injuries and fatalities by nearby traffic. Barricade-mounted warning lights meeting current specifications do not always provide consistent and adequate visual guidance to drivers and can contribute to glare and reduced safety. Through an implementation of sensors and wireless communications, a novel, intelligent set of warning lights and a tablet-based interface were developed. The lights modulate between 100% and 10% of maximum intensity rather than between 100% and off in order to improve visual guidance and adjust their overall intensity based on ambient conditions. The lights can be synchronized or operated in sequential flash patterns at any frequency between 1 and 4 Hz, and sequential patterns automatically update based on global positioning satellite (GPS) locations displayed in the control interface. A successful field demonstration of the system verified that its functions were viewed favorably by transportation safety personnel.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2117  
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Author Keshet-Sitton, A.; Or-Chen, K.; Yitzhak, S.; Tzabary, I.; Haim, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light and the City: Breast Cancer Risk Factors Differ Between Urban and Rural Women in Israel Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Integrative Cancer Therapies Abbreviated Journal Integr Cancer Ther  
  Volume 16 Issue 2 Pages 176-187  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract (down) Women are exposed to indoor and outdoor artificial light at night (ALAN) in urban and rural environments. Excessive exposure to hazardous ALAN containing short wavelength light may suppress pineal melatonin production and lead to an increased breast cancer (BC) risk. Our objective was to address the differences in BC risks related to light exposure in urban and rural communities. We examined indoor and outdoor light habits of BC patients and controls that had lived in urban and rural areas in a 5-year period, 10 to 15 years before the time of the study. Individual data, night time sleeping habits and individual exposure to ALAN habits were collected using a questionnaire. A total of 252 women (110 BC patients and 142 controls) participated in this study. The sample was divided to subgroups according to dwelling area and disease status. Age matching was completed between all subgroups. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated for urban and rural women separately, using binary logistic regression. OR results of urban population (92 BC patients and 72 control) revealed that BC risk increases with daily use of cellphone (OR = 2.13, 95% CI = 1.01-4.49, P < .05) and residence near strong ALAN sources (OR = 1.51, 95% CI = 0.99-2.30, P < .06). Nevertheless, BC risk decreases if a woman was born in Israel (OR = 0.44, 95% CI = 0.21-0.93, P < .03), longer sleep duration (OR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.53-1.05, P < .1), and reading with bed light illumination before retiring to sleep (OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.61-0.96, P < .02). Furthermore, in the rural population (18 BC patients and 66 control) BC risk increases with the number of years past since the last menstruation (OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.03-1.22, P < .01). However, BC risk decreases with longer sleep duration (OR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.24-1.14, P < .1), reading with room light illumination before retiring to sleep (OR = 0.55, 95% CI = 0.29-1.06, P < .07), and sleeping with closed shutters during the night (OR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.41-1.04, P < .08). These data support the idea that indoor and outdoor nighttime light exposures differ between urban and rural women. Therefore, we suggest that women can influence BC risk and incidence by applying protective personal lighting habits. Further studies with larger sample sizes are needed to strengthen the results.  
  Address University of Haifa, Mount Carmel, Haifa, Israel  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1534-7354 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27440788 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1492  
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Author Swaminathan, K.; Klerman, E.B.; Phillips, A.J.K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Are Individual Differences in Sleep and Circadian Timing Amplified by Use of Artificial Light Sources? Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms  
  Volume Issue Pages 748730417699310  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract (down) Within the human population, there is large interindividual variability in the timing of sleep and circadian rhythms. This variability has been attributed to individual differences in sleep physiology, circadian physiology, and/or light exposure. Recent experimental evidence suggests that the latter is necessary to evoke large interindividual differences in sleep and circadian timing. We used a validated model of human sleep and circadian physiology to test the hypothesis that intrinsic differences in sleep and circadian timing are amplified by self-selected use of artificial light sources. We tested the model under 2 conditions motivated by an experimental study (Wright et al., 2013): (1) a “natural” light cycle, and (2) a “realistic” light cycle that included attenuation of light due to living indoors when natural light levels are high and use of electric light when natural light levels are low. Within these conditions, we determined the relationship between intrinsic circadian period (within the range of 23.7-24.6 h) and timing of sleep onset, sleep offset, and circadian rhythms. In addition, we simulated a work week, with fixed wake time for 5 days and free sleep times on weekends. Under both conditions, a longer intrinsic period resulted in later sleep and circadian timing. Compared to the natural condition, the realistic condition evoked more than double the variation in sleep timing across the physiological range of intrinsic circadian periods. Model predictions closely matched data from the experimental study. We found that if the intrinsic circadian period was long (>24.2 h) under the realistic condition, there was significant mismatch in sleep timing between weekdays and weekends, which is known as social jetlag. These findings indicate that individual tendencies to have very delayed schedules can be greatly amplified by self-selected modifications to the natural light/dark cycle. This has important implications for therapeutic treatment of advanced or delayed sleep phase disorders.  
  Address School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28367676 Approved no  
  Call Number SU @ spitschan @ Serial 1648  
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Author Carley J. S., Grabarczyk, E. E., Vonhof, M. J., & Gill, S. A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Social factors, not anthropogenic noise or artificial light, influence onset of dawn singing in a common songbird Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication The Auk: Ornithological Advances Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract (down) With worldwide increases in artificial light and anthropogenic noise, understanding how these pollutants influence animals allows us to better mitigate potential negative effects. Both light and noise affect the timing of daily activities, including the onset of dawn song in birds, yet the influence of these pollutants compared with social factors that also influence song onset remains unknown. We investigated the onset of dawn song, testing hypotheses aimed at understanding the influences of light and noise pollution as well as male competition, pairing status, and breeding stage on timing of dawn singing by male House Wrens (Troglodytes aedon). Overall, models with social factors fit song onset data better than models with abiotic factors of noise and sky glow, and the highest ranking model included nesting stage, number of male neighbors, and temperature. Males began singing earlier when they were building nests and when mates were fertile than during later nesting stages. Males also sang earlier as the number of male neighbors increased. The timing of dawn song by male House Wrens appeared unaffected by day-to-day variation in light and noise pollution, with social factors having larger effects on the onset of daily behavior in this species.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2643  
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