|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Sharma, A.; Goyal, R.
Title Long-term exposure to constant light induces dementia, oxidative stress and promotes aggregation of sub-pathological Abeta42 in Wistar rats Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior Abbreviated Journal Pharmacol Biochem Behav
Volume in press Issue Pages 172892
Keywords Animals; Amyloid beta; Behavior, fluoxetine, rifampicin; Oxidative stress
Abstract Constant exposure to light is prevalent in modern society where light noise, shift work, and jet lag is common. Constant light exposure disrupts circadian rhythm, induces stress and thus influences memory performance. We subjected adult male Wistar rats to a two-month exposure to constant light (LL), constant dark or normal light-dark cycles. Significant cognitive impairment and oxidative stress were observed in LL rats without a significant elevation in soluble Abeta1-42 levels. Next, we examined whether long-term exposure to constant light may accelerate dementia in a sub-pathological Abeta model of rats. Normal control rats received ACSF, AD rats received 440pmol, and sub-pathological Abeta rats (Abeta(s)) received 220pmol of human Abeta42 peptide in a single unilateral ICV administration. Sub-pathological Abeta rats exposed to constant light (LL+Abeta(s)) show significant memory deficits and oxidative damage, although not significantly different from LL rats. Additionally, constant light promoted aggregation of exogenous Abeta42 in LL+Abeta(s) rats shown by the presence of congophilic plaques. Furthermore, chronic fluoxetine treatment (5mg/kg/day) rescued rats from the behavioral deficits, oxidative damage and amyloid aggregation. Whereas, rifampicin treatment (20mg/kg/day) did not reverse the behavioral deficits or oxidative stress but rescued rats from amyloid plaque formation. It was concluded that constant light for two months induces behavioral deficits, oxidative stress, and accelerates aggregation of sub-pathological concentrations of human-Abeta42 peptides in Wistar rats, which is reversed by daily fluoxetine administration.
Address (down) Neuropharmacology Laboratory, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shoolini University, Solan 173 212, Himachal Pradesh, India. Electronic address: rohitgoyal@shooliniuniversity.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0091-3057 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32142744 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2841
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chamorro, E.; Bonnin-Arias, C.; Perez-Carrasco, M.J.; Munoz de Luna, J.; Vazquez, D.; Sanchez-Ramos, C.
Title Effects of light-emitting diode radiations on human retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Photochemistry and Photobiology Abbreviated Journal Photochem Photobiol
Volume 89 Issue 2 Pages 468-473
Keywords Human Health; Apoptosis/*radiation effects; Biological Markers/metabolism; Caspases/metabolism; Cell Survival/radiation effects; DNA Damage; Epithelial Cells/cytology/metabolism/*radiation effects; Histones/metabolism; Humans; Light; Membrane Potential, Mitochondrial/*radiation effects; Mitochondria/*radiation effects; Photoperiod; Primary Cell Culture; Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism; Retinal Pigment Epithelium/cytology/metabolism/*radiation effects
Abstract Human visual system is exposed to high levels of natural and artificial lights of different spectra and intensities along lifetime. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are the basic lighting components in screens of PCs, phones and TV sets; hence it is so important to know the implications of LED radiations on the human visual system. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of LEDs radiations on human retinal pigment epithelial cells (HRPEpiC). They were exposed to three light-darkness (12 h/12 h) cycles, using blue-468 nm, green-525 nm, red-616 nm and white light. Cellular viability of HRPEpiC was evaluated by labeling all nuclei with DAPI; Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined by H2DCFDA staining; mitochondrial membrane potential was quantified by TMRM staining; DNA damage was determined by H2AX histone activation, and apoptosis was evaluated by caspases-3,-7 activation. It is shown that LED radiations decrease 75-99% cellular viability, and increase 66-89% cellular apoptosis. They also increase ROS production and DNA damage. Fluorescence intensity of apoptosis was 3.7% in nonirradiated cells and 88.8%, 86.1%, 83.9% and 65.5% in cells exposed to white, blue, green or red light, respectively. This study indicates three light-darkness (12 h/12 h) cycles of exposure to LED lighting affect in vitro HRPEpiC.
Address (down) Neuro-Computing and Neuro-Robotics Research Group, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain. eva.chamorro@opt.ucm.es
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0031-8655 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:22989198 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 511
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author de Jong, M.; Caro, S.P.; Gienapp, P.; Spoelstra, K.; Visser, M.E.
Title Early Birds by Light at Night: Effects of Light Color and Intensity on Daily Activity Patterns in Blue Tits Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms
Volume 32 Issue 4 Pages 323-333
Keywords Animals
Abstract Artificial light at night disturbs the daily rhythms of many organisms. To what extent this disturbance depends on the intensity and spectral composition of light remain obscure. Here, we measured daily activity patterns of captive blue tits ( Cyanistes caeruleus) exposed to similar intensities of green, red, or white light at night. Birds advanced their onset of activity in the morning under all light colors but more under red and white light than under green light. Offset of activity was slightly delayed in all light colors. The total activity over a 24-h period did not change but birds moved a part of their daily activity into the night. Since the effect of red and white lights are comparable, we tested the influence of light intensity in a follow-up experiment, where we compared the activity of the birds under different intensities of green and white light only. While in the higher range of intensities, the effects of white and green light were comparable; at lower intensities, green light had a less disturbing effect as compared with white light on daily rhythms in blue tits. Our results show that the extent of this disturbance can be mitigated by modulating the spectral characteristics and intensity of outdoor lighting, which is now feasible through the use of LED lighting.
Address (down) Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Department of Animal Ecology, Wageningen, The Netherlands
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28745147 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1863
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jan Stenvers, D.; Scheer, F.A.J.L.; Schrauwen, P.; la Fleur, S.E.; Kalsbeek, A.
Title Circadian clocks and insulin resistance Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Nature Reviews. Endocrinology Abbreviated Journal Nat Rev Endocrinol
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health; Review
Abstract Insulin resistance is a main determinant in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus and a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The circadian timing system consists of a central brain clock in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus and various peripheral tissue clocks. The circadian timing system is responsible for the coordination of many daily processes, including the daily rhythm in human glucose metabolism. The central clock regulates food intake, energy expenditure and whole-body insulin sensitivity, and these actions are further fine-tuned by local peripheral clocks. For instance, the peripheral clock in the gut regulates glucose absorption, peripheral clocks in muscle, adipose tissue and liver regulate local insulin sensitivity, and the peripheral clock in the pancreas regulates insulin secretion. Misalignment between different components of the circadian timing system and daily rhythms of sleep-wake behaviour or food intake as a result of genetic, environmental or behavioural factors might be an important contributor to the development of insulin resistance. Specifically, clock gene mutations, exposure to artificial light-dark cycles, disturbed sleep, shift work and social jet lag are factors that might contribute to circadian disruption. Here, we review the physiological links between circadian clocks, glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity, and present current evidence for a relationship between circadian disruption and insulin resistance. We conclude by proposing several strategies that aim to use chronobiological knowledge to improve human metabolic health.
Address (down) Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (NIN), Royal Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), Amsterdam, Netherlands. a.kalsbeek@nin.knaw.nl
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1759-5029 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30531917 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2133
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bos, A.R.; Gumanao, G.S.
Title The lunar cycle determines availability of coral-reef fishes at fish markets Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Journal of Fish Biology Abbreviated Journal J Fish Biol
Volume 81 Issue 6 Pages 2074-2079
Keywords Animals; Commerce; Coral Reefs; *Fishes; *Moon; Philippines; Seafood/*statistics & numerical data
Abstract During 139 visits between March 2009 and May 2011, it was found that the availability of reef fishes at a local fish market in the Philippines was highly affected by the lunar cycle. The number of vendors selling reef fishes was significantly lower (13.4%) during third lunar quarters (full moon periods) than during the first, second and fourth lunar quarters (40.2, 25.0 and 30.0%, respectively). It is recommended that the influence of the lunar cycle on fish availability is considered when designing sampling strategies for catch surveys.
Address (down) Netherlands Centre for Biodiversity Naturalis, RA Leiden, The Netherlands. arthurrbos@yahoo.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-1112 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23130702 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 65
Permanent link to this record