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Author Ratnasari, N.; Candra, E.D.; Saputra, D.H.; Perdana, A.P.
Title Urban Spatial Pattern and Interaction based on Analysis of Nighttime Remote Sensing Data and Geo-social Media Information Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science Abbreviated Journal IOP Conf. Ser.: Earth Environ. Sci.
Volume 47 Issue Pages 012038
Keywords remote sensing; geo-social media; spatial pattern; spatial interaction; urban; Indonesia
Abstract Urban development in Indonesia significantly increasing in line with rapid development of infrastructure, utility, and transportation network. Recently, people live depend on lights at night and social media and these two aspects can depicted urban spatial pattern and interaction. This research used nighttime remote sensing data with the VIIRS (Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite) day-night band detects lights, gas flares, auroras, and wildfires. Geo-social media information derived from twitter data gave big picture on spatial interaction from the geospatial footprint. Combined both data produced comprehensive urban spatial pattern and interaction in general for Indonesian territory. The result is shown as a preliminary study of integrating nighttime remote sensing data and geospatial footprint from twitter data.
Address (down) Undergraduate Program of Cartography and Remote Sensing, Department of Geographic Information Science, Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta 55281, Indonesia; nila.ratnasari(at)mail.ugm.ac.id
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher IOP Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1755-1307 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1653
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Author Perkin, E.K.; Hölker, F.; Heller, S.; Berghahn, R.
Title Artificial light and nocturnal activity in gammarids Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication PeerJ Abbreviated Journal PeerJ
Volume 2 Issue Pages e279
Keywords Acclimation; Gammarus; Invertebrate drift; Light pollution; Multispecies freshwater biomonitor
Abstract Artificial light is gaining attention as a potential stressor to aquatic ecosystems. Artificial lights located near streams increase light levels experienced by stream invertebrates and we hypothesized light would depress night drift rates. We also hypothesized that the effect of light on drift rates would decrease over time as the invertebrates acclimated to the new light level over the course of one month's exposure. These hypotheses were tested by placing Gammarus spp. in eight, 75 m x 1 m artificial flumes. One flume was exposed to strong (416 lx) artificial light at night. This strong light created a gradient between 4.19 and 0.04 lx over the neighboring six artificial flumes, while a control flume was completely covered with black plastic at night. Night-time light measurements taken in the Berlin area confirm that half the flumes were at light levels experienced by urban aquatic invertebrates. Surprisingly, no light treatment affected gammarid drift rates. In contrast, physical activity measurements of in situ individually caged G. roeseli showed they increased short-term activity levels in nights of complete darkness and decreased activity levels in brightly lit flumes. Both nocturnal and diurnal drift increased, and day drift rates were unexpectadly higher than nocturnal drift.
Address (down) Umweltbundesamt , Berlin , Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2167-8359 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24688857; PMCID:PMC3961812 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 322
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Author Breitler, J.-C.; Djerrab, D.; Leran, S.; Toniutti, L.; Guittin, C.; Severac, D.; Pratlong, M.; Dereeper, A.; Etienne, H.; Bertrand, B.
Title Full moonlight-induced circadian clock entrainment in Coffea arabica Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication BMC Plant Biology Abbreviated Journal BMC Plant Biol
Volume 20 Issue 1 Pages 24
Keywords Moonlight; Plants
Abstract BACKGROUND: It is now well documented that moonlight affects the life cycle of invertebrates, birds, reptiles, and mammals. The lunisolar tide is also well-known to alter plant growth and development. However, although plants are known to be very photosensitive, few studies have been undertaken to explore the effect of moonlight on plant physiology. RESULTS: Here for the first time we report a massive transcriptional modification in Coffea arabica genes under full moonlight conditions, particularly at full moon zenith and 3 h later. Among the 3387 deregulated genes found in our study, the main core clock genes were affected. CONCLUSIONS: Moonlight also negatively influenced many genes involved in photosynthesis, chlorophyll biosynthesis and chloroplast machinery at the end of the night, suggesting that the full moon has a negative effect on primary photosynthetic machinery at dawn. Moreover, full moonlight promotes the transcription of major rhythmic redox genes and many heat shock proteins, suggesting that moonlight is perceived as stress. We confirmed this huge impact of weak light (less than 6 lx) on the transcription of circadian clock genes in controlled conditions mimicking full moonlight.
Address (down) UMR IPME, Univ. Montpellier, CIRAD, IRD, F-34394, Montpellier, France
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1471-2229 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31941456 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2817
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Author Rodriguez, A.; Holmes, N.D.; Ryan, P.G.; Wilson, K.-J.; Faulquier, L.; Murillo, Y.; Raine, A.F.; Penniman, J.; Neves, V.; Rodriguez, B.; Negro, J.J.; Chiaradia, A.; Dann, P.; Anderson, T.; Metzger, B.; Shirai, M.; Deppe, L.; Wheeler, J.; Hodum, P.; Gouveia, C.; Carmo, V.; Carreira, G.P.; Delgado-Alburqueque, L.; Guerra-Correa, C.; Couzi, F.-X.; Travers, M.; Le Corre, M.
Title A global review of seabird mortality caused by land-based artificial lights Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Conservation Biology : the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology Abbreviated Journal Conserv Biol
Volume 31 Issue 5 Pages 986-1001
Keywords Animals; Ecology
Abstract Artificial lights at night cause high mortality of seabirds, one of the most endangered groups of birds globally. Fledglings of burrow-nesting seabirds, and to a lesser extent adults, are grounded by lights when they fly at night. We review the current state of knowledge of light attraction, identify information gaps and propose measures to address the problem. Although other avian families such as Alcidae and Anatidae can be involved, the most affected seabirds are petrels and shearwaters: at least 56 species, more than one-third of them (24) threatened, are grounded by lights. Grounded seabirds have been found worldwide, mainly on oceanic islands but also at some continental locations. Petrel breeding grounds confined to formerly uninhabited islands are particularly at risk from ever-growing levels of light pollution due to tourism and urban sprawl. Where it is impractical to ban external lights, rescue programs of grounded birds offer the most immediate and extended mitigation measures to reduce light-induced mortality, saving thousands of birds every year. These programs also provide useful information for seabird management. However, the data typically are fragmentary and often strongly biased so the phenomenon is poorly understood, leading to inaccurate impact estimates. We identified as the most urgent priority actions: 1) estimation of mortality and impact on populations; 2) assessment of threshold light levels and safe distances from light sources; 3) documenting the fate of rescued birds; 4) improvement of rescue campaigns, particularly in terms of increasing recovery rates and level of care; and 5) research on seabird-friendly lights to reduce attraction. More research is necessary to improve our understanding of this human-wildlife conflict and to design effective management and mitigation measures. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address (down) UMR ENTROPIE, Universite de la Reunion 15, avenue Rene Cassin – CS 92003 97744 Saint Denis Cedex 9, La Reunion, France
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0888-8892 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28151557 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1632
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Author Secondi, J.; Dupont, V.; Davranche, A.; Mondy, N.; Lengagne, T.; Thery, M.
Title Variability of surface and underwater nocturnal spectral irradiance with the presence of clouds in urban and peri-urban wetlands Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 12 Issue 11 Pages e0186808
Keywords Skyglow; Ecology
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is an increasing phenomenon worldwide. It causes a wealth of biological and ecological effects that may eventually affect populations and ecosystems. Despite the growing concern about ALAN, little is known about the light levels species are exposed to at night, especially for wetlands and underwater habitats. We determined nocturnal irradiance in urban and peri-urban wetlands above and under water, and assessed the effect of cloud cover on the variability of ALAN across the urban gradient. Even in aquatic habitats, cloud cover could increase irradiance beyond values observed during clear full moon nights. We report a negative relationship between baseline irradiance and the increase in irradiance during overcast nights. According to this result and previous studies, we propose that the change in the variation regime of ALAN between the urban center and rural land at its periphery is a usual feature. We discuss the ecological and evolutionary implications of this spatial variation in the urban and peri-urban environment.
Address (down) UMR 7179 CNRS-MNHN, Mecanismes Adaptatifs et Evolution, Brunoy, France
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29117235; PMCID:PMC5695598 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1801
Permanent link to this record