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Author Chen, H.; Sun, C.; Chen, X.; Chiang, K.; Xiong, X.
Title On-orbit calibration and performance of S-NPP VIIRS DNB Type Conference Article
Year 2016 Publication Proc. SPIE 9881, Earth Observing Missions and Sensors: Development, Implementation, and Characterization IV, 98812B (May 2, 2016) Abbreviated Journal Proc. SPIE 9881
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing; VIIRS, Suomi; VIIRS DNB; day-night band; calibration; Land Science Investigator-led Processing Systems; SIPS; Orbital dynamics; Sensors; Stray light; Contamination; Diffusers; Earth sciences; Equipment and services
Abstract The S-NPP VIIRS instrument has successfully operated since its launch in October 2011. The VIIRS Day-Night Band (DNB) is a panchromatic channel covering wavelengths from 0.5 to 0.9 μm that is capable of observing Earth scenes during both day and nighttime orbits at a spatial resolution of 750 m. To cover the large dynamic range, the DNB operates at low, mid, or high gain stages, and it uses an onboard solar diffuser (SD) for its low gain stage calibration. The SD observations also provide a means to compute gain ratios of low-to-mid and mid-to-high gain stages. This paper describes the DNB on-orbit calibration methodologies used by the VIIRS Characterization Support Team (VCST) in supporting the NASA earth science community with consistent VIIRS sensor data records (SDRs) made available by the Land Science Investigator-led Processing Systems (SIPS). It provides an assessment and update of DNB on-orbit performance, including the SD degradation in the DNB spectral range, detector gain and gain ratio trending, stray light contamination and its correction. Also presented in this paper are performance validations based on earth scenes and lunar observations.
Address (down) Science Systems and Applications, Inc.
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher SPIE Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1473
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Author Shlesinger, T.; Loya, Y.
Title Breakdown in spawning synchrony: A silent threat to coral persistence Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science
Volume 365 Issue 6457 Pages 1002-1007
Keywords Animals; Coral
Abstract The impacts of human and natural disturbances on coral reefs are typically quantified through visible damage (e.g., reduced coral coverage as a result of bleaching events), but changes in environmental conditions may also cause damage in less visible ways. Despite the current paradigm, which suggests consistent, highly synchronized spawning events, corals that reproduce by broadcast spawning are particularly vulnerable because their reproductive phenology is governed by environmental cues. Here, we quantify coral spawning intensity during four annual reproductive seasons, alongside laboratory analyses at the polyp, colony, and population levels, and we demonstrate that, compared with historical data, several species from the Red Sea have lost their reproductive synchrony. Ultimately, such a synchrony breakdown reduces the probability of successful fertilization, leading to a dearth of new recruits, which may drive aging populations to extinction.
Address (down) School of Zoology, George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978, Israel
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31488683 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2673
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Author Amichai, E.; Kronfeld-Schor, N.
Title Artificial Light at Night Promotes Activity Throughout the Night in Nesting Common Swifts (Apus apus) Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 11052
Keywords Animals
Abstract The use of artificial light at night (ALAN) is a rapidly expanding anthropogenic effect that transforms nightscapes throughout the world, causing light pollution that affects ecosystems in a myriad of ways. One of these is changing or shifting activity rhythms, largely synchronized by light cues. We used acoustic loggers to record and quantify activity patterns during the night of a diurnal bird – the common swift – in a nesting colony exposed to extremely intensive artificial illumination throughout the night at Jerusalem's Western Wall. We compared that to activity patterns at three other colonies exposed to none, medium, or medium-high ALAN. We found that in the lower-intensity ALAN colonies swifts ceased activity around sunset, later the more intense the lighting. At the Western Wall, however, swifts remained active throughout the night. This may have important implications for the birds' physiology, breeding cycle, and fitness, and may have cascading effects on their ecosystems.
Address (down) School of Zoology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31363144 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2594
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Author Wu, J.; He, S.; Peng, J.; Li, W.; Zhong, X.
Title Intercalibration of DMSP-OLS night-time light data by the invariant region method Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication International Journal of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Remote Sensing
Volume 34 Issue 20 Pages 7356-7368
Keywords DMSP-OLS; remote sensing; light at night
Abstract DMSP-OLS (Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Linescan System) night-time light data can accurately reflect the scope and intensity of human activities. However, the raw data cannot be used directly for temporal analyses due to the lack of inflight calibration. There are three problems that should be addressed in intercalibration. First, because of differences between sensors, the data are not identical even when obtained in the same year. Second, different acquisition times may lead to random or systematic fluctuations in the data obtained by satellites in different orbits. Third, a pixel saturation phenomenon also exists in the urban centres of the image. Therefore, an invariant region method was used in this article, and the relative radiometric calibration and saturation correction achieved the desired results. In the meantime, intercalibration models for each satellite year of DMSP-OLS night-time light data were produced. Finally, intercalibration accuracy was evaluated, and the intercalibration results were tested with the corresponding gross domestic product (GDP) data.
Address (down) School of Urban Planning and Design , Peking University , Shenzhen , 518055 , China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0143-1161 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 203
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Author Collison, F.M.; Poe, K.
Title “Astronomical Tourism”: The Astronomy and Dark Sky Program at Bryce Canyon National Park Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Tourism Management Perspectives Abbreviated Journal Tourism Management Perspectives
Volume 7 Issue Pages 1-15
Keywords Astronomy-related tourism; National parks; Night sky darkness; astrotourism; dark skies
Abstract Astronomical tourism represents a less-studied segment of sustainable tourism, where a dark night sky is the underlying resource. This article evaluates an astronomical tourism program, in this case at a national park with dark skies for observing. Bryce Canyon National Park (BCNP) in the southwestern United States has a well-developed astronomy program to serve visitors. The program consists of solar viewing during the day, multimedia evening programs, and night-time star gazing with telescopes. Depending on the specific measure used, it appears that up to 10% of park visitors may be involved with the formal Astronomy and Dark Sky Program and/or more informal astronomy activities. BCNP appears well positioned to take advantage of the dark sky attributes of the park and to educate visitors about the importance of maintaining and/or increasing the darkness of night skies. Potential future developments in the program may serve to further increase the number of visitors to BCNP.
Address (down) School of Travel Industry Management, 1901 Ruby Lane, Liberty, MO 64068; collison(at)hawaii.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2211-9736 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 128
Permanent link to this record