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Author Zele, A.J.; Cao, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Vision under mesopic and scotopic illumination Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Frontiers in Psychology Abbreviated Journal Front Psychol  
  Volume 5 Issue Pages 1594  
  Keywords vision; color; cones; mesopic; photopic; rods; scotopic; temporal  
  Abstract Evidence has accumulated that rod activation under mesopic and scotopic light levels alters visual perception and performance. Here we review the most recent developments in the measurement of rod and cone contributions to mesopic color perception and temporal processing, with a focus on data measured using a four-primary photostimulator method that independently controls rod and cone excitations. We discuss the findings in the context of rod inputs to the three primary retinogeniculate pathways to understand rod contributions to mesopic vision. Additionally, we present evidence that hue perception is possible under scotopic, pure rod-mediated conditions that involves cortical mechanisms.  
  Address (down) Visual Perception Laboratory, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago Chicago, IL, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1664-1078 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:25657632; PMCID:PMC4302711 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1180  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Pilz, L.K.; Levandovski, R.; Oliveira, M.A.B.; Hidalgo, M.P.; Roenneberg, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sleep and light exposure across different levels of urbanisation in Brazilian communities Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 11389  
  Keywords Human Health; Sleep  
  Abstract Quilombos are settlements originally founded by Africans and African descendants (Quilombolas) in remote parts of Brazil to escape slavery. Due to individual histories, Quilombos nowadays exhibit different states of industrialisation, making them ideal for studying the influence of electrification on daily behaviour. In a comparative approach, we aimed to understand whether and how human sleep changes with the introduction of artificial light. We investigated daily rest-activity-rhythms and sleep-patterns in the Quilombolas' by both wrist actimetry and the Munich ChronoType Questionnaire (MCTQ; the results of these two instruments correlated highly). Seven communities (MCTQ: N = 213/actimetry: N = 125) were compared in this study. Light exposure, phase of activity, sleep timing and duration differ across communities with various levels of urbanisation and histories of access to electricity. People living without electricity and those, who acquired it only very recently on average sleep earlier than those in more urbanised communities (mid-sleep about 1 hour earlier); sleep duration tends to be longer. Our results and those of others show that use of electricity and modern lifestyles have changed sleep behaviour. To understand the consequences of these changes for health, further studies are warranted.  
  Address (down) Visiting Professor at UFRGS/CAPES, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil. roenneberg@lmu.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30061685 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1968  
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Author Warrant, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Vision in the dimmest habitats on earth Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol  
  Volume 190 Issue 10 Pages 765-789  
  Keywords Animals; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; *Darkness; Eye/anatomy & histology; Fishes/physiology; Invertebrates; Oceans and Seas; Ocular Physiological Phenomena; Orientation/physiology; Space Perception/physiology; Vision, Ocular/*physiology  
  Abstract A very large proportion of the world's animal species are active in dim light, either under the cover of night or in the depths of the sea. The worlds they see can be dim and extended, with light reaching the eyes from all directions at once, or they can be composed of bright point sources, like the multitudes of stars seen in a clear night sky or the rare sparks of bioluminescence that are visible in the deep sea. The eye designs of nocturnal and deep-sea animals have evolved in response to these two very different types of habitats, being optimised for maximum sensitivity to extended scenes, or to point sources, or to both. After describing the many visual adaptations that have evolved across the animal kingdom for maximising sensitivity to extended and point-source scenes, I then use case studies from the recent literature to show how these adaptations have endowed nocturnal animals with excellent vision. Nocturnal animals can see colour and negotiate dimly illuminated obstacles during flight. They can also navigate using learned terrestrial landmarks, the constellations of stars or the dim pattern of polarised light formed around the moon. The conclusion from these studies is clear: nocturnal habitats are just as rich in visual details as diurnal habitats are, and nocturnal animals have evolved visual systems capable of exploiting them. The same is certainly true of deep-sea animals, as future research will no doubt reveal.  
  Address (down) Vision Group, Department of Cell and Organism Biology, University of Lund, Helgonavagen 3, 22362 Lund, Sweden. Eric.Warrant@cob.lu.se  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0340-7594 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:15375626 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 33  
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Author Blagonravov, M.L.; Bryk, A.A.; Medvedeva, E.V.; Goryachev, V.A.; Chibisov, S.M.; Kurlaeva, A.O.; Agafonov, E.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Structure of Rhythms of Blood Pressure, Heart Rate, Excretion of Electrolytes, and Secretion of Melatonin in Normotensive and Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats Maintained under Conditions of Prolonged Daylight Duration Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Bulletin of Experimental Biology and Medicine Abbreviated Journal Bull Exp Biol Med  
  Volume Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Animals; arterial hypertension; biological rhythms; excessive exposure to light; melatonin  
  Abstract We studied the structure of rhythms of BP, HR (by telemetric monitoring), electrolyte excretion (by capillary electrophoresis), and products of epiphyseal melatonin (by the urinary concentration of 6-sulfatoxymelatonin measured by ELISA) in normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats and spontaneously hypertensive SHR rats maintained at 16/8 h and 20/4 h light-dark regimes. In Wister-Kyoto rats exposed to prolonged daylight, we observed changes in the amplitude, rhythm power (% of rhythm), and range of oscillations of systolic BP; HR mezor decreased. In SHR rats, mezor of HR also decreased, but other parameters of rhythms remained unchanged. Changes in electrolyte excretion were opposite in normo- and hypertensive rats. Under conditions of 20/4 h light-dark regime, daytime melatonin production tended to increase in normotensive rats and significantly increased in SHR rats. At the same time, nighttime melatonin production did not change in both normotensive and hypertensive animals. As the secretion of melatonin has similar features in animals of both lines, we can say that the epiphyseal component of the “biological clock” is not the only component of the functional system that determines the response of the studied rhythms to an increase in the duration of light exposure.  
  Address (down) V. A. Frolov Department of General Pathology and Pathophysiology, Institute for Medicine, Peoples' Friendship University of Russia, Moscow, Russia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0007-4888 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31741240 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2755  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Pattison, P.M.; Tsao, J.Y.; Brainard, G.C.; Bugbee, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title LEDs for photons, physiology and food Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume 563 Issue 7732 Pages 493-500  
  Keywords Review; Lighting; Human Health; Plants  
  Abstract Lighting based on light-emitting diodes (LEDs) not only is more energy efficient than traditional lighting, but also enables improved performance and control. The colour, intensity and distribution of light can now be controlled with unprecedented precision, enabling light to be used both as a signal for specific physiological responses in humans and plants, and as an efficient fuel for fresh food production. Here we show how a broad and improved understanding of the physiological responses to light will facilitate greater energy savings and provide health and productivity benefits that have not previously been associated with lighting.  
  Address (down) Utah State University, Logan, UT, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30464269 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2110  
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