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Author Glass, J.; Ryan, P.
Title Reduced seabird night strikes and mortality in the Tristan rock lobster fishery Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication African Journal of Marine Science Abbreviated Journal African Journal of Marine Science
Volume 35 Issue 4 Pages 589-592
Keywords storm petrels; Pelagodroma marina; Fregetta grallaria; Fregetta tropica; common diving petrel; Pelecanoides urinatrix; broad-billed prion; Pachyptila vittata; Tristan rock lobster; Jasus tristani; seabirds; birds; collision; Gough Island; Tristan
Abstract The main impact of the fishery for Tristan rock lobster Jasus tristani on seabirds at the Tristan archipelago and Gough Island is through night strikes, when petrels collide with a ship after being disorientated by its lights. Tristan fishery observers have kept records of night strikes on the MV Edinburgh since the 2010/2011 fishing season. Over the last three years, 723 seabirds from nine species were recorded coming aboard the fishing vessel, with at least 39 (5.4%) birds dying as a result. Birds killed were broad-billed prions Pachyptila vittata (41%), common diving petrels Pelecanoides urinatrix (23%), and storm petrels (Pelagodroma marina and Fregetta grallaria/tropica 36%). All these species are listed as Least Concern globally, and the numbers killed per year are <0.1% of the island populations. The captain and crew of the Edinburgh are aware of the problem posed by deck lights at night, and attempt to keep external lighting to a minimum. As a result, the numbers of birds coming aboard vessels in this fishery have decreased from an average of 130 birds per night in 1989 to less than two birds per night in 2010–2013. Currently, most incidents occur during exceptional events when circumstances require deck lights to be lit at night. Consideration should be given to banning fishing operations at night, at least on misty nights.
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1814-232X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 53
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Author Rodríguez, A.; Rodríguez, B.; Curbelo, Á.J.; Pérez, A.; Marrero, S.; Negro, J.J.; Katzner, T.
Title Factors affecting mortality of shearwaters stranded by light pollution: Mortality of shearwaters attracted by light pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Animal Conservation Abbreviated Journal Anim Conserv
Volume 15 Issue 5 Pages 519-526
Keywords Cory's shearwater; Calonectris diomedea; birds; petrels; collisions; animals
Abstract Every year and across the world, thousands of fledglings of different petrel species crash into human structures because they are disorientated by artificial lights during their first flights. As this phenomenon is rather predictable, rescue campaigns are organized to help birds to reach the ocean, but unfortunately, a low proportion gets hurt or dies. Despite the huge number of affected individuals, and the fact that the problem was detected a long time ago, little is known on this source of mortality. We have studied the factors (i.e. body condition, plumage development, fledging date and sex) influencing the mortality of Cory's Shearwater Calonectris diomedea fledglings stranded inland due to light pollution in Tenerife (Canary Islands) during two consecutive breeding seasons (2009 and 2010). Late fledglings showed lower values of a body condition index than early ones. No sex biases were detected, neither considering stranded birds overall, nor for recovery dates or in the body condition of rescued fledglings. Our results indicate that late birds stranded by lights showing abundant down are more susceptible to fatal collisions and that the lights do not selectively kill birds with lower body condition indices. An enhancement of veterinary care should be done during the last part of the fledging period when more fatal collisions occur, especially focused on fledglings with abundant down. More research to determine why some individuals end up disoriented around artificial lights and others do not is urgently needed to minimize or prevent fallouts.
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1367-9430 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 55
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Author Longcore, T.; Rich, C.; Gauthreaux, S.A.
Title Height, Guy Wires, And Steady-Burning Lights Increase Hazard Of Communication Towers To Nocturnal Migrants: A Review And Meta-Analysis Type Journal Article
Year 2008 Publication The Auk Abbreviated Journal The Auk
Volume 125 Issue 2 Pages 485-492
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0004-8038 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 56
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Author Wiltschko, W.; Munro, U.; Ford, H.; Wiltschko, R.
Title Red light disrupts magnetic orientation of migratory birds Type Journal Article
Year 1993 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature
Volume 364 Issue 6437 Pages 525-527
Keywords magnetoreception; birds; animals
Abstract The transduction mechanisms and the neurophysiological basis of magnetoreception in birds are still largely unexplained, even though the role of the magnetic compass in the orientation of birds is fairly well understood. The discussion on magnetoreception in birds and terrestrial vertebrates focuses mainly on two mechanisms: small particles of magnetite and biochemical bi-radical reactions of excited macromolecules. When the bi-radical hypothesis was first proposed, magnetic resonance phenomena in the retina were suggested as the primary processes, which led to the question of whether magnetoreception was light-dependent. Homing experiments and electrophysiological evidence from pigeons have produced evidence consistent with such a mechanism. An effect of the spectral composition of light on magnetic compass orientation in amphibians has recently been described: under blue light of 450 nm and below, newts oriented as they did under the full spectrum, whereas they showed a roughly 90° counterclockwise shift when tested under wavelengths at or above 500 nm. Here we report the first orientation tests on migratory birds under light of different wavelengths; the results suggest a light-dependent process that appears to differ from that reported in newts.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 58
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Author Troy, J.R.; Holmes, N.D.; Green, M.C.
Title Modeling artificial light viewed by fledgling seabirds Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Ecosphere Abbreviated Journal Ecosphere
Volume 2 Issue 10 Pages art109
Keywords artificial light; fallout; Hydrobatidae; modeling; Newell's Shearwater; Procellariidae; Puffinus newelli; birds
Abstract Artificial light is increasing in coverage across the surface of our planet, impacting the behavioral ecology of many organisms. Attraction to sources of artificial light is a significant threat to certain fledgling shearwaters, petrels (Procellariidae), and storm-petrels (Hydrobatidae) on their first nocturnal flights to the sea. Disorientation by light can cause these birds to crash into vegetation or manmade structures, potentially resulting in death from physical injury, starvation, dehydration, predation by introduced predators, or collisions with vehicles. We developed a GIS-based method to model the intensity of artificial light that fledgling procellariids and hydrobatids could view en route to the ocean (to estimate the degree of threat that artificial light poses to these birds) and present two models for the island of Kauai as examples. These models are particularly relevant to the federally threatened Newell's Shearwater, or `A`o (Puffinus newelli), of which >30,000 fledglings have been collected in response to disorientation by lights on Kauai during the past 30 years. Our models suggest that there are few to no portions of Kauai from which young birds could fledge and not view light on their post-natal nocturnal flights, which is concerning given evidence of a Newell's Shearwater population decline. In future work using this technique, night light intensity layers could be altered to model the effects of modified coastal light conditions on known and potential procellariid and hydrobatid breeding locations. Furthermore, certain methods presented herein may be applicable to other seabirds and additional taxa in which attraction to anthropogenic light poses a serious threat, including migratory passerines and hatchling marine turtles. Components of this modeling approach could potentially be used to spatially estimate effects of other point-source threats to ecological systems, including sound and air pollution.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2150-8925 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 60
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