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Author Haim, A.; Shanas, U.; Zubidad, A.E.S.; Scantelbury, M.
Title Seasonality and Seasons Out of Time--The Thermoregulatory Effects of Light Interference Type Journal Article
Year 2005 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 22 Issue 1 Pages 59-66
Keywords *Photoperiod; Microtus socialis; voles; thermoregulation; biology; animals
Abstract The change in photoperiod is the main environmental cue for seasonal function of the reproductive, thermoregulatory, and immune systems in rodents existing outside of the tropics. In Israel, the social vole Microtus socialis breeds mainly under short photoperiod (SP) conditions. Previous studies showed that exposing voles to light interference (LI) in the field during the winter resulted in death. The aim of the current study was to determine the thermoregulatory response of SP-acclimated voles to LI. Therefore, heat production (VO2) at different ambient temperatures (Ta) and nonshivering thermogenesis (NST) were measured. Results show that LI of 15 min every 4h during the dark period significantly (p < 0.02) decreased VO2 at Ta = 15 degrees C and significantly (p < 0.05) decreased NST-capacity. These results can at least partly explain why LI-voles died during the winter under field conditions, through eliminating winter acclimatization of the thermoregulatory system, or what is considered as “seasons out of time.”
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ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 32
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Author Kyba, C.C.M.; Hölker, F.
Title Do artificially illuminated skies affect biodiversity in nocturnal landscapes? Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Landscape Ecology Abbreviated Journal Landscape Ecol
Volume 28 Issue 9 Pages 1637-1640
Keywords skyglow; light pollution; biodiversity
Abstract The skyglow from cities at night is one of the most dramatic modifications that humans have made to Earth’s biosphere, and it is increasingly extending into nocturnal landscapes (nightscapes) far beyond urban areas. This scattered light is dim and homogenous compared to a lit street, but can be bright compared to natural celestial light sources, such as stars. Because of the large area of Earth affected by artificial skyglow, it is essential to verify whether skyglow is a selective pressure in nocturnal landscapes. We propose two scientific approaches that could examine whether skyglow affects biodiversity.
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ISSN 0921-2973 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 35
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Author Hölker, F.; Wolter, C.; Perkin, E.K.; Tockner, K.
Title Light pollution as a biodiversity threat Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Trends in Ecology & Evolution Abbreviated Journal Trends Ecol Evol
Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 681-682
Keywords *Biodiversity; Biological Clocks; Biological Evolution; Ecosystem; *Environmental Monitoring; *Environmental Pollutants; Light/*adverse effects
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 0169-5347 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:21035893 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 36
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Author Rodrí­guez, A.; Rodrí­guez, B.; Lucas, M.P.
Title Trends in numbers of petrels attracted to artificial lights suggest population declines in Tenerife, Canary Islands Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Ibis Abbreviated Journal
Volume 154 Issue 1 Pages 167-172
Keywords Animals; birds; petrels; Cory's shearwater; Calonectris diomedea; Bulwer's Petrel; Bulweria bulwerii; Macaronesian Shearwater; Puffinus baroli; reproductive strategies
Abstract The secretive breeding behaviour of petrels makes monitoring their breeding populations challenging. To assess population trends of Cory's Shearwater Calonectris diomedea, Bulwer's Petrel Bulweria bulwerii and Macaronesian Shearwater Puffinus baroli in Tenerife from 1990 to 2010, we used data from rescue campaigns that aim to reduce the mortality of fledgling petrels attracted to artificial lights as proxies for trends in breeding population size. Despite increases in human population size and light pollution, the number of rescued fledglings of Cory's Shearwater and Bulwer's Petrel increased and remained stable, respectively, whereas numbers of rescued Macaronesian Shearwaters sharply declined. In the absence of more accurate population estimates, these results suggest a worrying decline in the Macaronesian Shearwater's breeding population.
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ISSN 0019-1019 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 38
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Author Filho, C.R.D.S.; Zullo Jr, J.; Elvidge, C.
Title Brazil's 2001 energy crisis monitored from space Type Journal Article
Year 2004 Publication International Journal of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Remote Sensing
Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 2475-2482
Keywords Remote Sensing; Energy
Abstract Data sensed by the US Air Force Defence Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) during the years 2000 and 2001 in Brazil were tested as a tool to monitor reduction of nocturnal lighting. This particular timing was examined as the Brazilian population and industry were forced to reduce electric power consumption by 20% during 2001, in relation to 2000, for a period of several months, starting officially on 1 June 2001. Large urban agglomerates were compelled to switch off city lights by at least the same amount. The Distrito Federal (DF), including the Brazilian capital, Brasilia, was one of the primary areas where the government actively sought electric power consumption reductions. Using the DF as a study case, we demonstrate that the mean grey levels derived from averaging DMSP-OLS data acquired over urban centres appear to be a useful index to monitor relative oscillations in energy consumption.
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ISSN 0143-1161 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2362
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