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Author (down) Wetterberg, L.
Title Melatonin and clinical application Type Journal Article
Year 1999 Publication Reproduction Nutrition Development Abbreviated Journal
Volume 39 Issue 3 Pages 367-382
Keywords Human Health
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 832
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Author (down) Westby, K.M.; Medley, K.A.
Title Cold Nights, City Lights: Artificial Light at Night Reduces Photoperiodically Induced Diapause in Urban and Rural Populations of Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Medical Entomology Abbreviated Journal J Med Entomol
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; Aedes albopictus; artificial light at night; common garden; diapause; urban ecology
Abstract As the planet becomes increasingly urbanized, it is imperative that we understand the ecological and evolutionary consequences of urbanization on species. One common attribute of urbanization that differs from rural areas is the prevalence of artificial light at night (ALAN). For many species, light is one of the most important and reliable environmental cues, largely governing the timing of daily and seasonal activity patterns. Recently, it has been shown that ALAN can alter behavioral, phenological, and physiological traits in diverse taxa. For temperate insects, diapause is an essential trait for winter survival and commences in response to declining daylight hours in the fall. Diapause is under strong selection pressure in the mosquito, Aedes albopictus (Skuse); local adaptation and rapid evolution has been observed along a latitudinal cline. It is unknown how ALAN affects this photosensitive trait or if local adaptation has occurred along an urbanization gradient. Using a common garden experiment, we experimentally demonstrated that simulated ALAN reduces diapause incidence in this species by as much as 40%. There was no difference, however, between urban and rural demes. We also calculated diapause incidence from wild demes in urban areas to determine whether wild populations exhibited lower than predicted incidence compared to estimates from total nocturnal darkness. In early fall, lower than predicted diapause incidence was recorded, but all demes reached nearly 100% diapause before terminating egg laying. It is possible that nocturnal resting behavior in vegetation limits the amount of ALAN exposure this species experiences potentially limiting local adaptation.
Address Tyson Research Center, Washington University in Saint Louis, Eureka, MO
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ISSN 0022-2585 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:32638000 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3042
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Author (down) West, K.E.; Jablonski, M.R.; Warfield, B.; Cecil, K.S.; James, M.; Ayers, M.A.; Maida, J.; Bowen, C.; Sliney, D.H.; Rollag, M.D.; Hanifin, J.P.; Brainard, G.C.
Title Blue light from light-emitting diodes elicits a dose-dependent suppression of melatonin in humans Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Journal of Applied Physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985) Abbreviated Journal J Appl Physiol (1985)
Volume 110 Issue 3 Pages 619-626
Keywords Circadian Rhythm/*physiology/*radiation effects; Color; Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation; Humans; Lighting/*methods; Melatonin/*blood; Metabolic Clearance Rate/radiation effects; Photic Stimulation/*methods; Radiation Dosage; Retina/*physiology/*radiation effects; Semiconductors; Young Adult; blue light
Abstract Light suppresses melatonin in humans, with the strongest response occurring in the short-wavelength portion of the spectrum between 446 and 477 nm that appears blue. Blue monochromatic light has also been shown to be more effective than longer-wavelength light for enhancing alertness. Disturbed circadian rhythms and sleep loss have been described as risk factors for astronauts and NASA ground control workers, as well as civilians. Such disturbances can result in impaired alertness and diminished performance. Prior to exposing subjects to short-wavelength light from light-emitting diodes (LEDs) (peak lambda = 469 nm; 1/2 peak bandwidth = 26 nm), the ocular safety exposure to the blue LED light was confirmed by an independent hazard analysis using the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists exposure limits. Subsequently, a fluence-response curve was developed for plasma melatonin suppression in healthy subjects (n = 8; mean age of 23.9 +/- 0.5 years) exposed to a range of irradiances of blue LED light. Subjects with freely reactive pupils were exposed to light between 2:00 and 3:30 AM. Blood samples were collected before and after light exposures and quantified for melatonin. The results demonstrate that increasing irradiances of narrowband blue-appearing light can elicit increasing plasma melatonin suppression in healthy subjects (P < 0.0001). The data were fit to a sigmoidal fluence-response curve (R(2) = 0.99; ED(50) = 14.19 muW/cm(2)). A comparison of mean melatonin suppression with 40 muW/cm(2) from 4,000 K broadband white fluorescent light, currently used in most general lighting fixtures, suggests that narrow bandwidth blue LED light may be stronger than 4,000 K white fluorescent light for suppressing melatonin.
Address Dept. of Neurology, Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107, USA
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ISSN 0161-7567 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:21164152 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 287
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Author (down) Wesołowski, M.
Title Impact of light pollution on the visibility of astronomical objects in medium-sized cities in Central Europe on the example of the city of Rzeszów, Poland Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy Abbreviated Journal J Astrophys Astron
Volume 40 Issue 3 Pages 20
Keywords Skyglow; Light pollution; cometary outburst; visibility of astronomical objects
Abstract This paper discusses the influence of light pollution of the night sky on the conditions of visibility of astronomical objects such as planets, stars and comets. This phenomenon has a huge impact on the observability of astronomical objects, especially in cities, where the brightness of the sky makes it difficult or even impossible to conduct astronomical observations. The main purpose of this article is to measure and analyse the surface brightness of the night sky in Rzeszów and its surroundings. A device called the Sky Quality Meter was used to measure the brightness of the night sky. This paper presents measurement results for the years 2015 and 2018, from which it is clear that the quality of the night sky has been deteriorated in terms of the observability of celestial bodies. As an example, the numerical value of the measurement for the centre of Rzeszów has been taken. In 2015, this value was 18.70±1.87 mag/arcsec2, while in 2018, it was equal to 16.73±1.67 mag/arcsec2. The results obtained were used to analyse the visibility of celestial bodies. Here, particular attention was paid to the analysis of the visibility of comets (also during the outburst), in the context of increasing light pollution of the night sky. Observers in neighboring villages have also experienced a change in the sky quality from Bortle Class V to Class VII, requiring objects to be approximately one magnitude brighter in order to be visible.
Address Faculty of Mathematics and Natural SciencesUniversity of Rzeszów, Rzeszów, Poland
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ISSN 0250-6335 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2529
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Author (down) Welz, P.-S.; Zinna, V.M.; Symeonidi, A.; Koronowski, K.B.; Kinouchi, K.; Smith, J.G.; Guillen, I.M.; Castellanos, A.; Crainiciuc, G.; Prats, N.; Caballero, J.M.; Hidalgo, A.; Sassone-Corsi, P.; Benitah, S.A.
Title BMAL1-Driven Tissue Clocks Respond Independently to Light to Maintain Homeostasis Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Cell Abbreviated Journal Cell
Volume 177 Issue 6 Pages 1436-1447.e12
Keywords Animals
Abstract Circadian rhythms control organismal physiology throughout the day. At the cellular level, clock regulation is established by a self-sustained Bmal1-dependent transcriptional oscillator network. However, it is still unclear how different tissues achieve a synchronized rhythmic physiology. That is, do they respond independently to environmental signals, or require interactions with each other to do so? We show that unexpectedly, light synchronizes the Bmal1-dependent circadian machinery in single tissues in the absence of Bmal1 in all other tissues. Strikingly, light-driven tissue autonomous clocks occur without rhythmic feeding behavior and are lost in constant darkness. Importantly, tissue-autonomous Bmal1 partially sustains homeostasis in otherwise arrhythmic and prematurely aging animals. Our results therefore support a two-branched model for the daily synchronization of tissues: an autonomous response branch, whereby light entrains circadian clocks without any commitment of other Bmal1-dependent clocks, and a memory branch using other Bmal1-dependent clocks to “remember” time in the absence of external cues.
Address Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona), Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, 08028 Barcelona, Spain; ICREA, Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies, 08010 Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: salvador.aznar-benitah@irbbarcelona.org
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ISSN 0092-8674 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:31150620 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2513
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