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Author (up) Becker, A.; Whitfield, A.K.; Cowley, P.D.; Järnegren, J.; Naesje, T.F.; Crispo, E.
Title Potential effects of artificial light associated with anthropogenic infrastructure on the abundance and foraging behaviour of estuary-associated fishes Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Journal of Applied Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Appl Ecol
Volume 50 Issue 1 Pages 43-50
Keywords fish; biology; ecology
Abstract As a consequence of a positive phototaxic response, the findings of this study suggest that artificial light often associated with man-made structures has the potential to alter fish communities within urban estuarine ecosystems by creating optimal conditions for predators. Future coastal developments should consider the ecological implications of lighting on aquatic communities. We recommend that lighting be minimized around coastal infrastructure and the use of red lights, which have limited penetration though water, be considered.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0021-8901 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 64
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Author (up) Beckmann, F.-W.
Title Die Botschaft der Lichtwerbung. Leuchtende Geschäftskennzeichnungen im Bild der Stadt Type Journal Article
Year 1986 Publication LICHT Abbreviated Journal
Volume 38 Issue 7 Pages 466-468
Keywords Economy
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language German Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 896
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Author (up) Bedrosian, T.A. (ed)
Title Circadian Disruption by Light at Night: Implications for Mood Type Book Whole
Year 2013 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords circadian disruption; sleep; light at night; melanopsin; mood; mental health; Mood Disorders; epigenetics; red light
Abstract Life on Earth has adapted to a consistent 24-h solar cycle. Circadian rhythms in physiology and behavior remain synchronized to the environment using light as the most potent entraining cue. During the past century, however, the widespread adoption of electric light has led to `round-the-clock’ societies. Instead of aligning with the environment, individuals follow artificial and often erratic light cycles created by social and work schedules. In particular, exposure to artificial light at night (LAN), termed “light pollution”, has become pervasive over the past 100 years. Virtually every individual living in the U.S. and Europe experiences this aberrant light exposure, and moreover about 20% of the population performs shift work. LAN may disrupt physiological timekeeping, leading to dysregulation of internal processes and misalignment between behavior and the environment. Recent evidence suggests that individuals exposed to excessive LAN, such as night shift workers, have increased risk for depressive disorders, but the biological mechanism remains unspecified. In mammals, intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) project light information to (1) the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the hypothalamus, regulating circadian rhythms, and (2) to limbic regions, putatively regulating mood. Thus, LAN has the potential to affect both circadian timekeeping and mood. In this dissertation, I present evidence from rodent studies supporting the novel hypothesis that night-time exposure to light disrupts circadian organization and contributes to depressed mood. First, I consider the physiological and behavioral consequences associated with unnatural exposure to LAN. The effects of LAN on circadian output are considered in terms of locomotor activity, the diurnal cortisol rhythm, and diurnal clock protein expression in the brain in Chapter 2. The influence of LAN on behavior and brain plasticity is discussed, with particular focus on depressive-like behavior (Chapter 3) and effects of SSRI treatment (Chapter 4). Effects of LAN on structural plasticity and gene expression in the brain are described, with emphasis on potential correlates of the depressive-like behavior observed under LAN in Chapter 5. Given the prevalence of LAN exposure and its importance, strategies for reversing the effects are offered. Specifically, eliminating LAN quickly reverses behavioral and physiological effects of exposure as described in Chapter 5. In Chapter 6 I report that administration of a pharmacological cytokine inhibitor prevents depressive-like behaviors in LAN, implicating brain inflammation in the behavioral effect. Finally, I demonstrate in Chapter 7 that exposure to red wavelength LAN reduces the effects on brain and behavior, suggesting that LAN acts through specific retinal pathways involving melanopsin. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the consequences of LAN, but also outline potential avenues for prevention or intervention.
Address Department of Neuroscience and The Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research The Ohio State University
Corporate Author Thesis Ph.D. thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor Bedrosian, T.A.
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 323
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Author (up) Bedrosian, T.A.; Fonken, L.K.; Nelson, R.J.
Title Endocrine Effects of Circadian Disruption Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Annual Review of Physiology Abbreviated Journal Annu Rev Physiol
Volume 78 Issue Pages 109-131
Keywords Health
Abstract Disruption of circadian rhythms, provoked by artificial lighting at night, inconsistent sleep-wake schedules, and transmeridian air travel, is increasingly prevalent in modern society. Desynchrony of biological rhythms from environmental light cycles has dramatic consequences for human health. In particular, disrupting homeostatic oscillations in endocrine tissues and the hormones that these tissues regulate can have cascading effects on physiology and behavior. Accumulating evidence suggests that chronic disruption of circadian organization of endocrine function may lead to metabolic, reproductive, sleep, and mood disorders. This review discusses circadian control of endocrine systems and the consequences of distorting rhythmicity of these systems. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Physiology Volume 78 is February 10, 2016. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/catalog/pubdates.aspx for revised estimates.
Address Laboratory of Genetics, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA 92037
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0066-4278 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26208951 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1231
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Author (up) Bedrosian, T.A.; Fonken, L.K.; Walton, J.C.; Nelson, R.J.
Title Chronic exposure to dim light at night suppresses immune responses in Siberian hamsters Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Biology Letters Abbreviated Journal Biol Lett
Volume 7 Issue 3 Pages 468-471
Keywords Animals; Blood Bactericidal Activity/immunology; Circadian Rhythm; Cricetinae; Fever/immunology; Hypersensitivity, Delayed/immunology; *Immunity; Light/*adverse effects; Lipopolysaccharides; Locomotion; Phodopus/*immunology
Abstract Species have been adapted to specific niches optimizing survival and reproduction; however, urbanization by humans has dramatically altered natural habitats. Artificial light at night (LAN), termed 'light pollution', is an often overlooked, yet increasing disruptor of habitats, which perturbs physiological processes that rely on precise light information. For example, LAN alters the timing of reproduction and activity in some species, which decreases the odds of successful breeding and increases the threat of predation for these individuals, leading to reduced fitness. LAN also suppresses immune function, an important proxy for survival. To investigate the impact of LAN in a species naive to light pollution in its native habitat, immune function was examined in Siberian hamsters derived from wild-caught stock. After four weeks exposure to dim LAN, immune responses to three different challenges were assessed: (i) delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), (ii) lipopolysaccharide-induced fever, and (iii) bactericide activity of blood. LAN suppressed DTH response and reduced bactericide activity of blood after lipopolysaccharide treatment, in addition to altering daily patterns of locomotor activity, suggesting that human encroachment on habitats via night-time lighting may inadvertently compromise immune function and ultimately fitness.
Address Department of Neuroscience, The Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. tracy.bedrosian@osumc.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1744-9561 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:21270021; PMCID:PMC3097873 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 90
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