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Author (up) Bedrosian, Tracy A; Fonken, Laura K; Walton, James C; Haim, Abraham; Nelson, Randy J
Title Dim light at night provokes depression-like behaviors and reduces CA1 dendritic spine density in female hamsters Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Psychoneuroendocrinology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 36 Issue 7 Pages 1062-1069
Keywords animals; Chronobiological effects; Behavior
Abstract The prevalence of major depression has increased in recent decades; however, the underlying causes of this phenomenon remain unspecified. One environmental change that has coincided with elevated rates of depression is increased exposure to artificial light at night. Shift workers and others chronically exposed to light at night are at increased risk of mood disorders,suggesting that nighttime illumination may influence brain mechanisms mediating affect. We tested the hypothesis that exposure to dim light at night may impact affective responses and alter morphology of hippocampal neurons. Ovariectomized adult female Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) were housed for 8 weeks in either a light/dark cycle (LD) or a light/dim light cycle (DM), and then behavior was assayed. DM-hamsters displayed more depression-like responses in the forced swim and the sucrose anhedonia tests compared with LD-hamsters. Conversely, in the elevated plus maze DM-hamsters reduced anxiety-like behaviors. Brains from the same animals were processed using the Golgi-Cox method and hippocampal neurons within CA1, CA3, and the dentate gyrus were analyzed for morphological characteristics. In CA1, DM-hamsters significantly reduced dendritic spine density on both apical and basilar dendrites, an effect which was not mediated by baseline cortisol, as concentrations were equivalent between groups. These results demonstrate dim light at night is sufficient to reduce synaptic spine connections to CA1. Importantly, the present results suggest that night-time low level illumination, comparable to levels that are pervasive in North America and Europe, may contribute to the increasing prevalence of mood disorders.
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Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1576
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Author (up) Beebe, W.
Title Rediscovery of the Bermuda cahow Type Journal Article
Year 1935 Publication Bulletin of the New York Zoological Society Abbreviated Journal
Volume 38 Issue Pages 187-190
Keywords Animals
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Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2556
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Author (up) Behar, H.
Title When the Light is Right Type Journal Article
Year 2005 Publication Convenience Store News Abbreviated Journal
Volume 41 Issue 14 Pages 113–120
Keywords Society
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Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 993
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Author (up) Behar-Cohen, F.; Martinsons, C.; Vienot, F.; Zissis, G.; Barlier-Salsi, A.; Cesarini, J.P.; Enouf, O.; Garcia, M.; Picaud, S.; Attia, D.
Title Light-emitting diodes (LED) for domestic lighting: any risks for the eye? Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Progress in Retinal and eye Research Abbreviated Journal Prog Retin Eye Res
Volume 30 Issue 4 Pages 239-257
Keywords Animals; Biomass; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Environmental Exposure; Eye Diseases/*etiology/pathology/physiopathology; Humans; *Light/adverse effects; Lighting/*methods; Reflex, Pupillary/physiology; Retina/pathology; Risk Assessment; *Semiconductors; Time Factors
Abstract Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are taking an increasing place in the market of domestic lighting because they produce light with low energy consumption. In the EU, by 2016, no traditional incandescent light sources will be available and LEDs may become the major domestic light sources. Due to specific spectral and energetic characteristics of white LEDs as compared to other domestic light sources, some concerns have been raised regarding their safety for human health and particularly potential harmful risks for the eye. To conduct a health risk assessment on systems using LEDs, the French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health & Safety (ANSES), a public body reporting to the French Ministers for ecology, for health and for employment, has organized a task group. This group consisted physicists, lighting and metrology specialists, retinal biologist and ophthalmologist who have worked together for a year. Part of this work has comprised the evaluation of group risks of different white LEDs commercialized on the French market, according to the standards and found that some of these lights belonged to the group risk 1 or 2. This paper gives a comprehensive analysis of the potential risks of white LEDs, taking into account pre-clinical knowledge as well as epidemiologic studies and reports the French Agency's recommendations to avoid potential retinal hazards.
Address Inserm UMRS 872, Physiopathology of Ocular Diseases: Therapeutic Innovations, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, Paris, France. Francine.behar-cohen@crc.jussieur.fr
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Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 240
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Author (up) Behera, S.K.; Mohanta, R.
Title Total An Investigation into Light Pollution as a Limiting factor for shift of Mass nesting ground at Rushikulya rookery Ganjam Odishas Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication American Journal of Marine Research and Reviews Abbreviated Journal
Volume 1 Issue 6 Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract Illumination due to artificial lights on nesting beaches and from nearby place to nesting beaches is detrimental to sea turtles because it alters critical nocturnal behaviors specifically, their choice of nesting sites and their return path to the sea after nesting. Illuminations perplex the hatchlings to find sea after emerging. Numerous studies conducted in other countries have demonstrated that artificial lights negatively impact on turtles, both female adults as they come to and go from their home beach to lay eggs, and to turtle hatchlings as they seek out the way to the open ocean. In this study we correlated the mass nesting intensity of 5years (2012 to 2018) at Rushikulya mass nesting site to the illumination zone. Illumination due to light conditions on nesting beaches are complex, and measuring light pollution in a way that effectively captures the impacts to sea turtles is difficult. But increase in intensity of illumination on selective mass nesting beaches showed gradual reduction in intensity of preferred nesting site during the mass nesting event. A gradual shift of nesting preference was also observed more toward darker zone.
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Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2104
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