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Author (up) Bailey, L.A.; Brigham, R.M.; Bohn, S.J.; Boyles, J.G.; Smit, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An experimental test of the allotonic frequency hypothesis to isolate the effects of light pollution on bat prey selection Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Oecologia Abbreviated Journal Oecologia  
  Volume 190 Issue 2 Pages 367–374  
  Keywords Animals; Ecology; bats; moths; insects; mammals  
  Abstract Artificial lights may be altering interactions between bats and moth prey. According to the allotonic frequency hypothesis (AFH), eared moths are generally unavailable as prey for syntonic bats (i.e., bats that use echolocation frequencies between 20 and 50 kHz within the hearing range of eared moths) due to the moths' ability to detect syntonic bat echolocation. Syntonic bats therefore feed mainly on beetles, flies, true bugs, and non-eared moths. The AFH is expected to be violated around lights where eared moths are susceptible to exploitation by syntonic bats because moths' evasive strategies become less effective. The hypothesis has been tested to date almost exclusively in areas with permanent lighting, where the effects of lights on bat diets are confounded with other aspects of human habitat alteration. We undertook diet analysis in areas with short-term, localized artificial lighting to isolate the effects of artificial lighting and determine if syntonic and allotonic bats (i.e., bats that use echolocation frequencies outside the hearing range of eared moths) consumed more moths under conditions of artificial lights than in natural darkness. We found that syntonic bats increased their consumption of moth prey under experimentally lit conditions, likely owing to a reduction in the ability of eared moths to evade the bats. Eared moths may increase in diets of generalist syntonic bats foraging around artificial light sources, as opposed to allotonic species and syntonic species with a more specialized diet.  
  Address Department of Zoology and Entomology, Rhodes University, P.O. Box 94, Grahamstown, 6140, South Africa. b.smit@ru.ac.za  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0029-8549 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31139944 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2511  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Baird, E.; Fernandez, D.C.; Wcislo, W.T.; Warrant, E.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Flight control and landing precision in the nocturnal bee Megalopta is robust to large changes in light intensity Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Frontiers in Physiology Abbreviated Journal Front. Physiol.  
  Volume 6 Issue Pages 305  
  Keywords animals; vision  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1664-042X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1289  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Baker, B.J.; Richardson, J.M.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effect of artificial light on male breeding-season behaviour in green frogs,Rana clamitans melanota Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Canadian Journal of Zoology Abbreviated Journal Can. J. Zool.  
  Volume 84 Issue 10 Pages 1528-1532  
  Keywords animals; amphibians; frogs; green frogs; Rana clamitans melanota; Reproduction; reproductive strategies  
  Abstract Artificial night lighting (or ecological light pollution) is only now gaining attention as a source of long-term effects on the ecology of both diurnal and nocturnal animals. The limited data available clearly indicate that artificial light can affect physiology and behaviour of animals, leading to ecological consequences at the population, community, and ecosystem levels. Aquatic ecosystems may be particularly vulnerable to such effects, and nocturnally breeding animals such as frogs may be especially affected. To address this potential, we quantify the effects of artificial light on calling and movement behaviour in a rural population of male green frogs (Rana clamitans melanota (Rafinesque, 1820)) during the breeding season. When exposed to artificial light, frogs produced fewer advertisement calls and moved more frequently than under ambient light conditions. Results clearly demonstrate that male green frog behaviour is affected by the presence of artificial light in a manner that has the potential to reduce recruitment rates and thus affect population dynamics.  
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  ISSN 0008-4301 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 71  
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Author (up) Baker, G.C.; Dekker, R.W.R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Lunar synchrony in the reproduction of the Moluccan Megapode Megapodius wallacei Type Journal Article
  Year 2000 Publication Ibis Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 142 Issue 3 Pages 382-388  
  Keywords Moluccan Megapode; Megapodius wallacei; birds; nesting; reproduction; animals; *Moon  
  Abstract The Moluccan Megapode Megapodius wallacei uses heat generated by the sun to incubate its eggs. It buries the eggs deep in the sand of sun-exposed beaches and open sandy areas on islands in the Moluccas, Indonesia. The eggs are laid at night and left to incubate for two to three months without parental care. We present evidence that the Moluccan Megapode exhibits lunar synchrony in the timing of egg-laying, its spatial distribution of egg burrows and in its behaviour at communal nesting grounds. More Moluccan Megapodes visit the nesting grounds on bright nights than during the new moon. Data collected on the spatial distribution and depth of egg burrows also exhibit lunar periodicity. On moonlit nights, the birds excavate burrows in communal groups and spend longer at the nesting ground digging deeper burrows. Lunaphilia and lunar periodicity of reproduction are rarely documented in birds. We discuss possible explanations for these behaviours in the Moluccan Megapode.  
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  ISSN 0019-1019 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 52  
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Author (up) Baker, J. openurl 
  Title Toad aggregations under street lamps Type Journal Article
  Year 1990 Publication British Herpetological Society Bulletin Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 31 Issue Pages 26–27  
  Keywords Animals  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 990  
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