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Author (up) Babaii, A., Adib-Hajbaghery, M., & Hajibagheri, A.
Title Effect of Using Eye Mask on Sleep Quality in Cardiac Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Nursing and Midwifery Studies Abbreviated Journal
Volume 4 Issue 4 Pages
Keywords Human Health
Abstract BACKGROUND:

Patients in coronary care unit are at risk of sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation can be associated with increased blood pressure and heart rate, raising the risk of developing cardiovascular problems among patients hospitalized in coronary care unit.

OBJECTIVES:

This study was carried out to examine the effect of eye mask on sleep quality in cardiac patients.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

In this randomized controlled trial, 60 patients who met the inclusion criteria were selected using a convenient sampling method and randomly allocated into the experimental and control groups. Patients in the control group received routine care. However, in the experimental group, patients received routine care and eye mask for three subsequent nights. In the both groups, the sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh sleep quality index. Data were analyzed by the chi-square test, independent samples t-test, Mann-Whitney U, and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests.

RESULTS:

After the study, the median scores of the subjective sleep quality, the sleep latency, the sleep duration, the habitual sleep efficiency, and the sleep disturbances domains, as well as the median score of overall Pittsburgh sleep quality index in the experimental group were significantly lower than those in the control group (P < 0.05). However, no significant differences were observed between the two groups in terms of the use of sleep medications and the daytime dysfunction domains (P > 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Using eye mask can significantly improve the sleep quality in cardiac patients. Therefore, nurses are recommended to use eye mask in combination with current treatments for improving patients' sleep quality.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2303
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Author (up) Bach, S.; usanne; Degenring, F. (eds)
Title Dark Nights, Bright Lights: Night, Darkness, and Illumination in Literature Type Book Whole
Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Society; literature; art
Abstract Light and darkness shape our perception of the world. This is true in a literal sense, but also metaphorically: in theology, philosophy, literature and the arts the light of day signifies life, safety, knowledge and all that is good, while the darkness of the night suggests death, danger, ignorance and evil.

A closer inspection, however, reveals that things are not quite so clear cut and that light and darkness cannot be understood as simple binary opposites. On a biological level, for example, daylight and darkness are inseparable factors in the calibration of our circadian rhythms, and a lack of periodical darkness appears to be as contrary to health as a lack of exposure to sunlight. On a cultural level, too, night and darkness are far from being universally condemnable: in fiction, drama and poetry the darkness of the night allows not only nightmares but also dreams, it allows criminals to ply their trade and allows lovers to meet, it allows the pursuit of pleasure as well as deep thought, it allows metamorphoses, transformations and transgressions unthinkable in the light of day. But night is not merely darkness. The night gains significance as an alternative space, as an ‘other of the day’, only when it is at least partially illuminated.

The volume examines the interconnection of night, darkness and nocturnal illumination across a broad range of literary texts. The individual essays examine historically specific light conditions in literature, tracing the symbolic and metaphoric content of darkness and illumination and the attitudes towards them.
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Publisher De Gruyter Place of Publication Editor Bach, S.; usanne; Degenring, F.
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Anglia Book Series Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume 50 Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN 978-3-11-041529-2 Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1308
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Author (up) Bachleitner, W.; Kempinger, L.; Wülbeck, C.; Rieger, D.; Helfrich-Förster, C.
Title Moonlight shifts the endogenous clock of Drosophila melanogaster Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication PNAS Abbreviated Journal
Volume 104 Issue 9 Pages 3538–3543
Keywords Animals; circadian rhythm; dual; oscillator model; PERIOD; synchronization; TIMELESS
Abstract The ability to be synchronized by light–dark cycles is a fundamental property of circadian clocks. Although there are indications that circadian clocks are extremely light-sensitive and that they can be set by the low irradiances that occur at dawn and dusk, this has not been shown on the cellular level. Here, we demonstrate that a subset of Drosophila's pacemaker neurons responds to nocturnal dim light. At a nighttime illumination comparable to quarter-moonlight intensity, the flies increase activity levels and shift their typical morning and evening activity peaks into the night. In parallel, clock protein levels are reduced, and clock protein rhythms shift in opposed direction in subsets of the previously identified morning and evening pacemaker cells. No effect was observed on the peripheral clock in the eye. Our results demonstrate that the neurons driving rhythmic behavior are extremely light-sensitive and capable of shifting activity in response to the very low light intensities that regularly occur in nature. This sensitivity may be instrumental in adaptation to different photoperiods, as was proposed by the morning and evening oscillator model of Pittendrigh and Daan. We also show that this adaptation depends on retinal input but is independent of cryptochrome.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 405
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Author (up) Bachner, J.P.
Title The Lighting Equation. Type Journal Article
Year 2004 Publication In: Gourmet Retailer Abbreviated Journal
Volume 25 Issue 8 Pages 190–192
Keywords Economy
Abstract
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 875
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Author (up) Baddiley, C.
Title Light pollution modelling, and measurements at Malvern Hills AONB, of county conversion to blue rich LEDs Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer
Volume 219 Issue Pages 142-173
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract The introduction of blue rich colour, Correlated-Colour-Temperature (CCT) 6000K road lighting could increase skyglow significantly compared with CCT 3000K types, if the blue content reaches the sky.

Highways England have a policy for lighting specification on motorways advised by the author's work. This is a categorised environmental impact point system of summed brightness as a function of angle from vertically down to the cut off angle; but with no CCT limitation.

Modelling was done for Malvern-Hills Area-of-Outstanding-Natural-Beauty (MHAONB), for the nighttime environmental impact of the LED replacement of Low-Pressure-Sodium throughout Herefordshire. The study was extended to include High-Pressure-Sodium and to LEDs at several CCTs, for the same Photopic ground illuminance.

Dark-Sky-Survey geographic location results for the MHAONB (2012) are described. Near-Zenith sky brightness photometry became continuous from 2016 at 2 minute intervals in all weathers, not just clear nights, with a networked calibrated Unihedron Lensed Sky Quality Meter (LSQM). Samples were also taken of all-sky camera images, corrected for vignetting and near-Zenith calibrated with the LSQM, to study weather effects, Milky Way contribution, and Herefordshire lighting conversion to blue-rich LEDs (2013-15), compared with the less converted Severn valley direction.

Time-plots and histogram analysis showed a small reduction in brightness (2012-2018), 0.1 mag.arcsec−2. Most variation is from increased sampling of distant cloud cover effects. Mist or low cloud on the horizon obscures light sources beyond reducing local skyglow, while high cloud reflects, increasing clear sky brightness. The Milky Way is critically 20% above background. Darkest periods near Zenith reach 21.1 mag.arcsec−2, to 21.2 after rain or surrounding low-cloud or poor-visibility. Clear-sky brightness decreases into early hours (∼0.03 mag.arcsec−2/hr); dimming effects were not seen.

The Zenith brightness is still set by distant cities, while towards the horizon, commercial and private uncontrolled non-directional LED lighting is increasing, negating the improvements in road lighting.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1914
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