|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author (up) Ahn, J.; Ahn, S.-E.; Yang, K.-S.; Kim, S.-W.; Oh, J.
Title Effects of a high level of illumination before sleep at night on chorioretinal thickness and ocular biometry Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Experimental eye Research Abbreviated Journal Exp Eye Res
Volume 164 Issue Pages 157-167
Keywords Vision
Abstract The choroid is affected by many factors. One of the factors, change in illumination has been suggested to influence choroidal thickness. However, the effects of bright light before sleep at night on the human eye are not well established. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a high level of illumination in the evening on ocular measurements. Twenty-seven men with myopia spent seven consecutive nights in the sleep laboratory. During the first two nights, subjects were exposed to light at 150 lux between 20:00 and midnight. Then, for five consecutive nights, they were exposed to ambient light at 1000 lux between 20:00 and midnight. Ocular parameters and their diurnal variations were compared between the two periods and the effects of a high level of illumination were analyzed. After subjects were exposed to 1000 lux of illumination, axial length increased with borderline significance (p = 0.064). Macular volume and retinal thickness did not change. However, subfoveal choroidal thickness after exposure to 1000 lux of illumination (245.37 +/- 52.84 mum) was significantly lower than that after 150 lux of illumination (268.00 +/- 57.10 mum), (p < 0.001). Significant diurnal variations were found in mean keratometry (p = 0.039), intraocular pressure (IOP, p = 0.003), ocular perfusion pressure (OPP, p < 0.0001), macular volume (p = 0.019), and subfoveal choroidal thickness (p < 0.0001). A high level of illumination had significant effects on only IOP and OPP (p = 0.027 and 0.017, respectively). Bright light exposure before sleep at an intensity as high as 1000 lux reduced subfoveal choroidal thickness in healthy young men. In conclusion, diurnal variation in choroidal thickness can be affected by bright light exposure before sleep.
Address Department of Ophthalmology, Korea University College of Medicine, 73, Inchon-ro, Sungbuk-gu, Seoul 02841, South Korea. Electronic address: ojr4991@korea.ac.kr
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0014-4835 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28887137 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1729
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Akacem, L.D.; Wright, K.P.J.; LeBourgeois, M.K.
Title Bedtime and evening light exposure influence circadian timing in preschool-age children: A field study Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Neurobiology of Sleep and Circadian Rhythms Abbreviated Journal Neurobiol Sleep Circadian Rhythms
Volume 1 Issue 2 Pages 27-31
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Light exposure and sleep timing are two factors that influence inter-individual variability in the timing of the human circadian clock. The aim of this study was to quantify the degree to which evening light exposure predicts variance in circadian timing over and above bedtime alone in preschool children. Participants were 21 children ages 4.5-5.0 years (4.7 +/- 0.2 years; 9 females). Children followed their typical sleep schedules for 4 days during which time they wore a wrist actigraph to assess sleep timing and a pendant light meter to measure minute-by-minute illuminance levels in lux. On the 5th day, children participated in an in-home dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO) assessment. Light exposure in the 2 h before bedtime was averaged and aggregated across the 4 nights preceding the DLMO assessment. Mean DLMO and bedtime were 19:22 +/- 01:04 and 20:07 +/- 00:46, respectively. Average evening light exposure was 710.1 +/- 1418.2 lux. Children with later bedtimes (lights-off time) had more delayed melatonin onset times (r=0.61, p=0.002). Evening light exposure was not independently associated with DLMO (r=0.32, p=0.08); however, a partial correlation between evening light exposure and DLMO when controlling for bedtime yielded a positive correlation (r=0.46, p=0.02). Bedtime explained 37.3% of the variance in the timing of DLMO, and evening light exposure accounted for an additional 13.3% of the variance. These findings represent an important step in understanding factors that influence circadian phase in preschool-age children and have implications for understanding a modifiable pathway that may underlie late sleep timing and the development of evening settling problems in early childhood.
Address Sleep and Development Laboratory, Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2451-9944 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28042611; PMCID:PMC5193478 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1755
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Al Zahrani, M.H.; Omar, A.I.; Abdoon, A.M.O.; Ibrahim, A.A.; Alhogail, A.; Elmubarak, M.; Elamin, Y.E.; AlHelal, M.A.; Alshahrani, A.M.; Abdelgader, T.M.; Saeed, I.; El Gamri, T.B.; Alattas, M.S.; Dahlan, A.A.; Assiri, A.M.; Maina, J.; Li, X.H.; Snow, R.W.
Title Cross-border movement, economic development and malaria elimination in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication BMC Medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Med
Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 98
Keywords Remote Sensing; Human Health
Abstract Malaria at international borders presents particular challenges with regards to elimination. International borders share common malaria ecologies, yet neighboring countries are often at different stages of the control-to-elimination pathway. Herein, we present a case study on malaria, and its control, at the border between Saudi Arabia and Yemen. Malaria program activity reports, case data, and ancillary information have been assembled from national health information systems, archives, and other related sources. Information was analyzed as a semi-quantitative time series, between 2000 and 2017, to provide a plausibility framework to understand the possible contributions of factors related to control activities, conflict, economic development, migration, and climate. The malaria recession in the Yemeni border regions of Saudi Arabia is a likely consequence of multiple, coincidental factors, including scaled elimination activities, cross-border vector control, periods of low rainfall, and economic development. The temporal alignment of many of these factors suggests that economic development may have changed the receptivity to the extent that it mitigated against surges in vulnerability posed by imported malaria from its endemic neighbor Yemen. In many border areas of the world, malaria is likely to be sustained through a complex congruence of factors, including poverty, conflict, and migration.
Address Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. rsnow@kemri-wellcome.org
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1741-7015 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29940950 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1948
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Alaasam, V.J.; Duncan, R.; Casagrande, S.; Davies, S.; Sidher, A.; Seymoure, B.; Shen, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Ouyang, J.Q.
Title Light at night disrupts nocturnal rest and elevates glucocorticoids at cool color temperatures Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol
Volume 329 Issue 8-9 Pages 465-472
Keywords Animals
Abstract Nighttime light pollution is quickly becoming a pervasive, global concern. Since the invention and proliferation of light-emitting diodes (LED), it has become common for consumers to select from a range of color temperatures of light with varying spectra. Yet, the biological impacts of these different spectra on organisms remain unclear. We tested if nighttime illumination of LEDs, at two commercially available color temperatures (3000 and 5000 K) and at ecologically relevant illumination levels affected body condition, food intake, locomotor activity, and glucocorticoid levels in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). We found that individuals exposed to 5000 K light had higher rates of nighttime activity (peaking after 1 week of treatment) compared to 3000 K light and controls (no nighttime light). Birds in the 5000 K treatment group also had increased corticosterone levels from pretreatment levels compared to 3000 K and control groups but no changes in body condition or food intake. Individuals that were active during the night did not consequently decrease daytime activity. This study adds to the growing evidence that the spectrum of artificial light at night is important, and we advocate the use of nighttime lighting with warmer color temperatures of 3000 K instead of 5000 K to decrease energetic costs for avian taxa.
Address Department of Biology, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29766666 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1909
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Alabia, I.; Dehara, M.; Saitoh, S.-I.; Hirawake, T.
Title Seasonal Habitat Patterns of Japanese Common Squid (Todarodes Pacificus) Inferred from Satellite-Based Species Distribution Models Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 8 Issue 11 Pages 921
Keywords Remote Sensing; Animals
Abstract The understanding of the spatio-temporal distributions of the species habitat in the marine environment is central to effectual resource management and conservation. Here, we examined the potential habitat distributions of Japanese common squid (Todarodes pacificus) in the Sea of Japan during a four-year period. The seasonal patterns of preferential habitat were inferred from species distribution models, built using squid occurrences detected from night-time visible images and remotely-sensed environmental factors. The predicted squid habitat (i.e., areas with high habitat suitability) revealed strong seasonal variability, characterized by a reduction of potential habitat, confined off of the southern part of the basin during the winter–spring period (December–May). Apparent expansion of preferential habitat occurred during summer–autumn months (June–November), concurrent with the formation of highly suitable habitat patches in certain regions of the Sea of Japan. These habitat distribution patterns were in response to changes in oceanographic conditions and synchronous with seasonal migration of squid. Moreover, the most important variables regulating the spatio-temporal patterns of suitable habitat were sea surface temperature, depth, sea surface height anomaly, and eddy kinetic energy. These variables could affect the habitat distributions through their impacts on growth and survival of squid, local nutrient transport, and the availability of favorable spawning and feeding grounds.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1551
Permanent link to this record