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Author (up) Ben-Attia, M.; Reinberg, A.; Smolensky, M.H.; Gadacha, W.; Khedaier, A.; Sani, M.; Touitou, Y.; Boughamni, N.G.
Title Blooming rhythms of cactus Cereus peruvianus with nocturnal peak at full moon during seasons of prolonged daytime photoperiod Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 33 Issue 4 Pages 419-430
Keywords Plants; Moonlight
Abstract Cereus peruvianus (Peruvian apple cactus) is a large erect and thorny succulent cactus characterized by column-like (cereus [L]: column), that is, candle-shaped, appendages. For three successive years (1100 days), between early April and late November, we studied the flowering patterns of eight cacti growing in public gardens and rural areas of north and central Tunisia, far from nighttime artificial illumination, in relation to natural environmental light, temperature, relative humidity and precipitation parameters. Flower blooming was assessed nightly between 23:00 h and until at least 02:00 h, and additionally around-the-clock at ~1 h intervals for 30 consecutive days during the late summer of each year of study to quantify both nyctohemeral (day-night) and lunar patterns. During the summer months of prolonged daytime photoperiod, flower blooming of C. peruvianus exhibited predictable-in-time variation as “waves” with average period of 29.5 days synchronized by the light of the full moon. The large-sized flower (~16 cm diameter) opens almost exclusively at night, between sunset and sunrise, as a 24 h rhythm during a specific 3-4-day span of the lunar cycle (full moon), with a strong correlation between moon phase and number and proportion of flowers in bloom (ranging from r = +0.59 to +0.91). Black, blue and red cotton sheets were used to filter specific spectral bands of nighttime moonlight from illuminating randomly selected plant appendages as a means to test the hypothesis of a “gating” 24 h rhythm phenomenon of photoreceptors at the bud level. Relative to control conditions (no light filtering), black sheet covering inhibited flower bud induction by 87.5%, red sheet covering by 46.6% and blue sheet covering by 34%, and the respective inhibiting effects on number of flowers in bloom were essentially 100%, ~81% and ~44%. C. peruvianus is a unique example of a terrestrial plant that exhibits a circadian flowering rhythm (peak ~00:00 h) “gated” by 24 h, lunar 29.5-day (bright light of full moon) and annual 365.25-day (prolonged summertime day length) environmental photoperiod cycles.
Address e Departement des Sciences de la Vie, Faculte des Sciences de Bizerte , Universite de Carthage , Zarzouna , Tunisie
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27030087 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1411
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Author (up) Bender; D.J.; Bayne, E.M.; Brigham, R.M.
Title Lunar condition influences coyote (canis latrans) howling. Type Journal Article
Year 1996 Publication American Midland Naturalist Abbreviated Journal
Volume 136 Issue 2 Pages 413-417
Keywords Animals
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 413
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Author (up) Benedetto, M.M.; Contin, M.A.
Title Oxidative Stress in Retinal Degeneration Promoted by Constant LED Light Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Front. Cell. Neurosci.
Volume 13 Issue Pages
Keywords Vision; Human Health
Abstract Light pollution by artificial light, might accelerate retinal diseases and circadian asynchrony. The excess of light exposure is a growing problem in societies, so studies on the consequences of long-term exposure to low levels of light are needed to determine the effects on vision. The possibility to understand the molecular mechanisms of light damage will contribute to the knowledge about visual disorders related to defects in the phototransduction. Several animal models have been used to study retinal degeneration (RD) by light; however, some important aspects remain to be established. Previously, we demonstrated that cool white treatment of 200 lux light-emitting diode (LED) induces retinal transformation with rods and cones cell death and significant changes in opsin expression in the inner nuclear layer (INL) and ganglion cell layer (GCL). Therefore, to further develop describing the molecular pathways of RD, we have examined here the oxidative stress and the fatty acid composition in rat retinas maintained at constant light. We demonstrated the existence of oxidative reactions after 5 days in outer nuclear layer (ONL), corresponding to classical photoreceptors; catalase (CAT) enzyme activity did not show significant differences in all times studied and the fatty acid study showed that docosahexaenoic acid decreased after 4 days. Remarkably, the docosahexaenoic acid diminution showed a correlation with the rise in stearic acid indicating a possible association between them. We assumed that the reduction in docosahexaenoic acid may be affected by the oxidative stress in photoreceptors outer segment which in turn affects the stearic acid composition with consequences in the membrane properties. All these miss-regulation affects the photoreceptor survival through unknown mechanisms involved. We consider that oxidative stress might be one of the pathways implicated in RD promoted by light.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1662-5102 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2333
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Author (up) Benedetto, M.M.; Guido, M.E.; Contin, M.A.
Title Non-Visual Photopigments Effects of Constant Light-Emitting Diode Light Exposure on the Inner Retina of Wistar Rats Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Frontiers in Neurology Abbreviated Journal Front Neurol
Volume 8 Issue Pages 417
Keywords changes in retinal structure; light-emitting diode light; non-visual opsin localization; retinal degeneration models; retinal light damage
Abstract The retina is part of the central nervous system specially adapted to capture light photons and transmit this information to the brain through photosensitive retinal cells involved in visual and non-visual activities. However, excessive light exposure may accelerate genetic retinal diseases or induce photoreceptor cell (PRC) death, finally leading to retinal degeneration (RD). Light pollution (LP) caused by the characteristic use of artificial light in modern day life may accelerate degenerative diseases or promote RD and circadian desynchrony. We have developed a working model to study RD mechanisms in a low light environment using light-emitting diode (LED) sources, at constant or long exposure times under LP conditions. The mechanism of PRC death is still not fully understood. Our main goal is to study the biochemical mechanisms of RD. We have previously demonstrated that constant light (LL) exposure to white LED produces a significant reduction in the outer nuclear layer (ONL) by classical PRC death after 7 days of LL exposure. The PRCs showed TUNEL-positive labeling and a caspase-3-independent mechanism of cell death. Here, we investigate whether constant LED exposure affects the inner-retinal organization and structure, cell survival and the expression of photopigments; in particular we look into whether constant LED exposure causes the death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), of intrinsically photosensitive RGCs (ipRGCs), or of other inner-retinal cells. Wistar rats exposed to 200 lx of LED for 2 to 8 days (LL 2 and LL 8) were processed for histological and protein. The results show no differences in the number of nucleus or TUNEL positive RGCs nor inner structural damage in any of LL groups studied, indicating that LL exposure affects ONL but does not produce RGC death. However, the photopigments melanopsin (OPN4) and neuropsin (OPN5) expressed in the inner retina were seen to modify their localization and expression during LL exposure. Our findings suggest that constant light during several days produces retinal remodeling and ONL cell death as well as significant changes in opsin expression in the inner nuclear layer.
Address Centro de Investigaciones en Quimica Biologica de Cordoba (CIQUIBIC), CONICET, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Cordoba, Argentina
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1664-2295 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28871236; PMCID:PMC5566984 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1711
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Author (up) Benfield, J.A.; Nutt, R.J.; Taff, B.D.; Miller, Z.D.; Costigan, H.; Newman, P.
Title A laboratory study of the psychological impact of light pollution in National Parks Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Environmental Psychology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Environmental Psychology
Volume 57 Issue Pages 67-72
Keywords Conservation; Skyglow; Psychology
Abstract Light pollution is ubiquitous in much of the developed and developing world, including rural and wilderness areas. Other sources of pollution, such as noise or motorized vehicle emissions, are known to impact the perceived quality of natural settings as well as the psychological well-being and satisfaction of visitors to those locations, but the effects of light pollution on visitors to natural settings is largely unstudied. Using experimental manipulations of light pollution levels in virtual reality simulations of three U.S. National Parks, the current study aimed to provide initial evidence of an effect on visitors. Results show that light pollution impacts a range of psychological and scene evaluation dimensions but that pristine night skies are not necessarily viewed as the ideal, likely due to being viewed as unfamiliar or unrealistic because so few have experienced the true baseline.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0272-4944 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1941
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