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Author (up) Aubrecht, C.; Stojan-Dolar, M.; de Sherbinin, A.; Jaiteh, M.; Longcore, T.; Elvidge, C.
Title Lighting governance for protected areas and beyond – Identifying the urgent need for sustainable management of artificial light at night Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Earthzine Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages e61460
Keywords Editorial
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Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 465
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Author (up) Aubrecht, T.; Weil, Z.; Nelson, R.
Title Dim light at night interferes with the development of the short-day phenotype and impairs cell-mediated immunity in Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology Abbreviated Journal J. Exp. Zool.
Volume 321 Issue 8 Pages 450-456
Keywords animals; seasonal timing; chronobiological effects
Abstract Winter is a challenging time to survive and breed outside of the tropics. Animals use day length (photoperiod) to regulate seasonally appropriate adaptations in anticipation of challenging winter conditions. The net result of these photoperiod-mediated adjustments is enhanced immune function and increased survival. Thus, the ability to discriminate day length information is critical for survival and reproduction in small animals. However, during the past century, urban and suburban development has rapidly expanded and filled the night sky with light from various sources, obscuring crucial light-dark signals, which alters physiological interpretation of day lengths. Furthermore, reduced space, increased proximity to people, and the presence of light at night may act as stressors for small animals. Whereas acute stressors typically enhance immune responses, chronic exposure to stressors often impairs immune responses. Therefore, we hypothesized that the combination of dim light at night and chronic stress interferes with enhanced cell-mediated immunity observed during short days. Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) were assigned to short or long days with dark nights (0 lux) or dim (5 lux) light at night for 10 weeks. Following 2 weeks of chronic restraint (6 hr/day), a model of chronic stress, delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses were assessed. Both dim light at night and restraint reduced the DTH response. Dim light at night during long nights produced an intermediate short day phenotype. These results suggest the constant presence of light at night could negatively affect survival of photoperiodic rodents by disrupting the timing of breeding and immune responses.
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Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1574
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Author (up) Aulsebrook, A.E.; Jones, T.M.; Mulder, R.A.; Lesku, J.A.
Title Impacts of artificial light at night on sleep: A review and prospectus Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol
Volume 329 Issue 8-9 Pages 409-418
Keywords Review; Animals; Health
Abstract Natural cycles of light and darkness govern the timing of most aspects of animal behavior and physiology. Artificial light at night (ALAN)-a recent and pervasive form of pollution-can mask natural photoperiodic cues and interfere with biological rhythms. One such rhythm vulnerable to perturbation is the sleep-wake cycle. ALAN may greatly influence sleep in humans and wildlife, particularly in animals that sleep predominantly at night. There has been some recent evidence for impacts of ALAN on sleep, but critical questions remain. Some of these can be addressed by adopting approaches already entrenched in sleep research. In this paper, we review the current evidence for impacts of ALAN on sleep, highlight gaps in our understanding, and suggest opportunities for future research.
Address La Trobe University, School of Life Sciences, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
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ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:29869374 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1933
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Author (up) Aulsebrook, A.E.; Jones, T.M.; Rattenborg, N.C.; Roth, T.C. 2nd; Lesku, J.A.
Title Sleep Ecophysiology: Integrating Neuroscience and Ecology Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Trends in Ecology & Evolution Abbreviated Journal Trends Ecol Evol
Volume 31 Issue 8 Pages 590-599
Keywords Commentary; Physiology
Abstract Here, we propose an original approach to explain one of the great unresolved questions in animal biology: what is the function of sleep? Existing ecological and neurological approaches to this question have become roadblocks to an answer. Ecologists typically treat sleep as a simple behavior, instead of a heterogeneous neurophysiological state, while neuroscientists generally fail to appreciate the critical insights offered by the consideration of ecology and evolutionary history. Redressing these shortfalls requires cross-disciplinary integration. By bringing together aspects of behavioral ecology, evolution, and conservation with neurophysiology, we can achieve a more comprehensive understanding of sleep, including its implications for adaptive waking behavior and fitness.
Address La Trobe University, School of Life Sciences, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Electronic address: j.lesku@latrobe.edu.au
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ISSN 0169-5347 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:27262386 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1462
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Author (up) Austin, M.; Hearnshaw, J.
Title Case Study 16.1: Lake Tekapo – Aoraki – Mount Cook Starlight Reserve, New Zealand Type Book Chapter
Year 2010 Publication In: Ruggles, C. und Cotte, M. (Hrsg.): Heritage Sites of Astronomy and Archaeoastronomy in the context of the UNESCO World Heritage Convention – A Thematic Study. Paris Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 246-249
Keywords Economy
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Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 869
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