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Author Bapary, Mohammad AJ; Amin, Md Nurul; Takeuchi, Yuki; Takemura, Akihiro
Title The stimulatory effects of long wavelengths of light on the ovarian development in the tropical damselfish, Chrysiptera cyanea Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Aquaculture Abbreviated Journal
Volume 314 Issue 1-4 Pages 188-192
Keywords animals; fish; reproduction
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Call Number (down) LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1575
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Author Bedrosian, Tracy A; Fonken, Laura K; Walton, James C; Haim, Abraham; Nelson, Randy J
Title Dim light at night provokes depression-like behaviors and reduces CA1 dendritic spine density in female hamsters Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Psychoneuroendocrinology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 36 Issue 7 Pages 1062-1069
Keywords animals; Chronobiological effects; Behavior
Abstract The prevalence of major depression has increased in recent decades; however, the underlying causes of this phenomenon remain unspecified. One environmental change that has coincided with elevated rates of depression is increased exposure to artificial light at night. Shift workers and others chronically exposed to light at night are at increased risk of mood disorders,suggesting that nighttime illumination may influence brain mechanisms mediating affect. We tested the hypothesis that exposure to dim light at night may impact affective responses and alter morphology of hippocampal neurons. Ovariectomized adult female Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) were housed for 8 weeks in either a light/dark cycle (LD) or a light/dim light cycle (DM), and then behavior was assayed. DM-hamsters displayed more depression-like responses in the forced swim and the sucrose anhedonia tests compared with LD-hamsters. Conversely, in the elevated plus maze DM-hamsters reduced anxiety-like behaviors. Brains from the same animals were processed using the Golgi-Cox method and hippocampal neurons within CA1, CA3, and the dentate gyrus were analyzed for morphological characteristics. In CA1, DM-hamsters significantly reduced dendritic spine density on both apical and basilar dendrites, an effect which was not mediated by baseline cortisol, as concentrations were equivalent between groups. These results demonstrate dim light at night is sufficient to reduce synaptic spine connections to CA1. Importantly, the present results suggest that night-time low level illumination, comparable to levels that are pervasive in North America and Europe, may contribute to the increasing prevalence of mood disorders.
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Call Number (down) LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1576
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Author Bengsen, Andrew J; Leung, Luke K P; Lapidge, Steven J; Gordon, Iain J
Title Artificial illumination reduces bait-take by small rainforest mammals Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Applied Animal Behaviour Science Abbreviated Journal
Volume 127 Issue 1-2 Pages 66-72
Keywords animals; field experiment; predation risk
Abstract Small mammals often moderate their foraging behaviour in response to cues indicating a high local predation risk. We assessed the ability of cues associated with a high predation risk to reduce the consumption of bait by non-target small mammal species in a tropical rainforest, without inhibiting bait-take by feral pigs (Sus scrofa). The illumination of feeding stations with a low power light source caused small mammals to reduce their foraging intensity on sunflower seeds mixed through sand by 25% (P< 0.001) and on unprocessed corn-based feral pig bait by 80% (P< 0.001). Illumination also reduced the intensity with which small mammals fed on commercially manufactured baits (odds ratio. = 6.17, P= 0.009). Illumination did not cause pigs to reduce their intake of corn bait (P= 0.43). Neither pig nor dingo (Canis lupus dingo) vocalisations had any detectable effect on the foraging intensity of small mammals (P> 0.05 for all treatments). We conclude that site illumination was an effective method of selectively deterring small mammals from consuming feral pig baits in our study region, but had no effect on consumption of those baits by pigs.
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Call Number (down) LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1577
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Author Bennett, Victoria J; Hale, Amanda M
Title Red aviation lights on wind turbines do not increase bat-turbine collisions Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Animal Conservation Abbreviated Journal
Volume 17 Issue 4 Pages 354-358
Keywords animals; flying mammals; foraging; Light wavelength
Abstract Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain why bat–wind turbine collisions occur; however, most of these hypotheses have yet to be tested and with high numbers of bat fatalities reported annually at wind resource facilities globally, there is a real need to understand this phenomenon. In this study, we tested whether aviation lighting influenced the number of bat fatalities at wind turbines. Thus, at a utility-scale wind facility in north-central Texas, we explored whether bat fatalities were higher at wind turbines with red flashing aviation lighting compared with turbines without such lighting. Over a 5-year period, we recorded fatalities at wind turbines as part of a long-term fatality monitoring programme. During standardized searches, we collected 916 bat carcasses representing all six species known to be present at the site. We found that bat fatalities were higher at wind turbines without aviation lighting compared with those with; a pattern that was driven by one species, Lasiurus borealis, and there was no significant difference between fatalities at wind turbines with or without aviation lighting for any other species. Our study demonstrates that wind turbines should continue to be fitted with synchronized, flashing red aviation lights, as this form of lighting does not appear to be one of the potential causes of bat fatalities at wind resource facilities. We therefore support further research that explores possible alternative causes of bat–wind turbine interactions. More specifically, we reiterate that there is still a pressing need to determine the aspects of bat ecology that result in individuals coming into contact with wind turbines.
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Call Number (down) LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1578
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Author Blask, David E; Dauchy, Robert T; Dauchy, Erin M; Mao, Lulu; Hill, Steven M; Greene, Michael W; Belancio, Victoria P; Sauer, Leonard A; Davidson, Leslie
Title Light exposure at night disrupts host/cancer circadian regulatory dynamics: Impact on the Warburg effect, lipid signaling and tumor growth prevention Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal
Volume 9 Issue 8 Pages e102776
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Abstract The central circadian clock within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) plays an important role in temporally organizing and coordinating many of the processes governing cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth in synchrony with the daily light/dark cycle which may contribute to endogenous cancer prevention. Bioenergetic substrates and molecular intermediates required for building tumor biomass each day are derived from both aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect) and lipid metabolism. Using tissue-isolated human breast cancer xenografts grown in nude rats, we determined that circulating systemic factors in the host and the Warburg effect, linoleic acid uptake/metabolism and growth signaling activities in the tumor are dynamically regulated, coordinated and integrated within circadian time structure over a 24-hour light/dark cycle by SCN-driven nocturnal pineal production of the anticancer hormone melatonin. Dim light at night (LAN)-induced melatonin suppression disrupts this circadian-regulated host/cancer balance among several important cancer preventative signaling mechanisms, leading to hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia in the host and runaway aerobic glycolysis, lipid signaling and proliferative activity in the tumor.
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Call Number (down) LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1579
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