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Author Russ, A.; Reitemeier, S.; Weissmann, A.; Gottschalk, J.; Einspanier, A.; Klenke, R.
Title Seasonal and urban effects on the endocrinology of a wild passerine Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Ecology and Evolution Abbreviated Journal Ecol Evol
Volume 5 Issue 23 Pages 5698–5710
Keywords Animals; endocrinology; blackbirds; birds; European blackbird; Turdus merula; estrone; testosterone; corticosterone
Abstract In order to maximize their fitness, organisms in seasonal environments rely on external cues to optimally time their life-history stages. One of the most important zeitgeber to time reproduction is the photoperiod, but further environmental cues are assessed to fine-tune reproduction due to year-to-year variation in environmental conditions. However, in urbanized environments, the pervasive artificial light at night has altered the natural signal of light and darkness. Accordingly, artificial light at night was repeatedly shown to affect avian reproductive physiology and to advance seasonal reproduction in birds. However, these experiments were mainly conducted in the absence of further environmental cues to facilitate the investigation of the mechanisms which are still poorly understood. Here, we investigate whether the endocrine system of free-ranging European blackbirds (Turdus merula) correlates with the amount of artificial light at night along a rural to urban gradient while the birds still encounter complementary environmental cues including seasonal variation in day length and temperature. Testosterone and estrone were assessed as metabolites in fecal samples and corticosterone in blood from mist-netted blackbirds. We demonstrate that seasonal fluctuations in abiotic factors, individual conditions, but also light at night affect the reproductive and stress physiology of wild European blackbirds. Elevated artificial night light intensities were significantly positively correlated with corticosterone and negatively with female estrone levels. No effects of artificial light were found for testosterone levels. Our results suggest that female blackbirds in particular perceive even low levels of artificial light at night as a weak but chronic stressor that interacts with the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and leads to a reduced secretion of reproductive hormones. These findings point out that the impacts of light pollution are diverse and we only slowly disentangle its multiple effects on physiology, ecology, and biodiversity.
Address Department of Conservation Biology, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-7758 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (down) LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1303
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Author Jin, H.; Jin, S.; Chen, L.; Cen, S.; Yuan, K.
Title Research on the Lighting Performance of LED Street Lights With Different Color Temperatures Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication IEEE Photonics Journal Abbreviated Journal IEEE Photonics J.
Volume 7 Issue 6 Pages 1-9
Keywords Lighting; LED; light-emitting diodes; PC-LED; dark adaption; color perception; fog; skyglow
Abstract While light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are a very efficient lighting option, whether phosphor-coated LEDs (PC-LEDs) are suitable for street lighting remains to be tested. Correlated color temperature (CCT), mesopic vision illuminance, dark adaption, color perception, fog penetration, and skyglow pollution are important factors that determine alight's suitability for street lighting. In this paper, we have closely examined the lighting performance of LED street lights with different color temperatures and found that low-color-temperature (around 3000 K) PC-LEDs are more suitable for street lighting.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher IEEE Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1943-0655 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (down) LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1307
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Author Miller, S.D.; Straka, W.C. 3rd; Yue, J.; Smith, S.M.; Alexander, M.J.; Hoffmann, L.; Setvak, M.; Partain, P.T.
Title Upper atmospheric gravity wave details revealed in nightglow satellite imagery Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Abbreviated Journal Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A
Volume 112 Issue Pages 49
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Gravity waves (disturbances to the density structure of the atmosphere whose restoring forces are gravity and buoyancy) comprise the principal form of energy exchange between the lower and upper atmosphere. Wave breaking drives the mean upper atmospheric circulation, determining boundary conditions to stratospheric processes, which in turn influence tropospheric weather and climate patterns on various spatial and temporal scales. Despite their recognized importance, very little is known about upper-level gravity wave characteristics. The knowledge gap is mainly due to lack of global, high-resolution observations from currently available satellite observing systems. Consequently, representations of wave-related processes in global models are crude, highly parameterized, and poorly constrained, limiting the description of various processes influenced by them. Here we highlight, through a series of examples, the unanticipated ability of the Day/Night Band (DNB) on the NOAA/NASA Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership environmental satellite to resolve gravity structures near the mesopause via nightglow emissions at unprecedented subkilometric detail. On moonless nights, the Day/Night Band observations provide all-weather viewing of waves as they modulate the nightglow layer located near the mesopause ( approximately 90 km above mean sea level). These waves are launched by a variety of physical mechanisms, ranging from orography to convection, intensifying fronts, and even seismic and volcanic events. Cross-referencing the Day/Night Band imagery with conventional thermal infrared imagery also available helps to discern nightglow structures and in some cases to attribute their sources. The capability stands to advance our basic understanding of a critical yet poorly constrained driver of the atmospheric circulation.
Address Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0027-8424 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26630004 Approved no
Call Number (down) LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1309
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Author Blonski, S.; Cao, C.
Title Suomi NPP VIIRS Reflective Solar Bands Operational Calibration Reprocessing Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 7 Issue 12 Pages 16131-16149
Keywords Instrumentation
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (down) LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1310
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Author Silva, A.D.; Diez‐Méndez, D.; Kempenaers, B.
Title Effects of experimental night lighting on the daily timing of winter foraging in common European songbirds Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Journal of Avian Biology Abbreviated Journal J Avian Biol
Volume 48 Issue Pages 862-871
Keywords Animals
Abstract The ecological effects of light pollution are becoming better understood, especially in birds. Recent studies have shown that several bird species can use street lighting to extend activity into the night during the breeding season. However, most of these studies are correlational and little is known about the effects of artificial night lighting on the timing of activities outside the breeding season. During winter, low temperatures and short days may limit foraging opportunities and can negatively affect survival of resident birds. However, night lighting may allow them to expand the time niche available for foraging. Here, we report on a study where we repeatedly manipulated the amount of night lighting during early winter at automated feeding stations in a natural forest. We used video-recordings at the feeders to determine the time of the first (at dawn) and last (at dusk) foraging visits for six songbird species. We predicted that all species, and in particular the naturally early-foraging species, would advance their daily onset of foraging during the mornings with night lighting, but would show minimal or no delays in their daily cessation of foraging during the lighted evenings. We found that two early-foraging species, the blue tit and the great tit, started foraging earlier during the experimentally lighted mornings. However, in great tits, this effect was weak and restricted to nights with inclement weather. The light treatment did not have any effect on the start of foraging in the willow/marsh tit, the nuthatch, the European jay, and the blackbird. Artificial night lighting did not cause later foraging at dusk in any of the six species. Overall, our results suggest that artificial light during winter has only small effects on timing of foraging. We discuss these findings and the importance of temperature and winter weather in shaping the observed foraging patterns.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0908-8857 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (down) LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1627
Permanent link to this record