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Author Cho, C.-H.; Lee, H.-J.; Yoon, H.-K.; Kang, S.-G.; Bok, K.-N.; Jung, K.-Y.; Kim, L.; Lee, E.-I.
Title Exposure to dim artificial light at night increases REM sleep and awakenings in humans Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 33 Issue 1 Pages 117-123
Keywords Human Health; Sleep
Abstract Exposure to artificial light at night (ALAN) has become increasing common, especially in developed countries. We investigated the effect of dALAN exposure during sleep in healthy young male subjects. A total of 30 healthy young male volunteers from 21 to 29 years old were recruited for the study. They were randomly divided into two groups depending on light intensity (Group A: 5 lux and Group B: 10 lux). After a quality control process, 23 healthy subjects were included in the study (Group A: 11 subjects, Group B: 12 subjects). Subjects underwent an NPSG session with no light (Night 1) followed by an NPSG session randomly assigned to two different dim light conditions (5 or 10 lux, dom lambda: 501.4 nm) for a whole night (Night 2). We found significant sleep structural differences between Nights 1 and 2, but no difference between Groups A and B. Exposure to dALAN during sleep was significantly associated with increased wake time after sleep onset (WASO; F = 7.273, p = 0.014), increased Stage N1 (F = 4.524, p = 0.045), decreased Stage N2 (F = 9.49, p = 0.006), increased Stage R (F = 6.698, p = 0.017) and non-significantly decreased REM density (F = 4.102, p = 0.056). We found that dALAN during sleep affects sleep structure. Exposure to dALAN during sleep increases the frequency of arousals, amount of shallow sleep and amount of REM sleep. This suggests adverse effects of dALAN during sleep on sleep quality and suggests the need to avoid exposure to dALAN during sleep.
Address e Department of Preventive Medicine , Korea University College of Medicine , Seoul , South Korea
Corporate Author Thesis
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26654880 Approved no
Call Number (down) LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1322
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Author Crowley, S.J.; Suh, C.; Molina, T.A.; Fogg, L.F.; Sharkey, K.M.; Carskadon, M.A.
Title Estimating the dim light melatonin onset of adolescents within a 6-h sampling window: the impact of sampling rate and threshold method Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Sleep Medicine
Volume 20 Issue Pages 59-66
Keywords Human Health
Abstract
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (down) LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1324
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Author Pendoley, K.; Kamrowski, R.L.
Title Sea-finding in marine turtle hatchlings: What is an appropriate exclusion zone to limit disruptive impacts of industrial light at night? Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Journal for Nature Conservation Abbreviated Journal Journal for Nature Conservation
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords animals; conservation
Abstract Artificial light is increasingly being recognized as a globally-significant ecological threat, but appropriate management has lagged behind that of other environmental pollutants. Industrial developments associated with the extraction of natural resources generate large amounts of artificial light. Marine turtles are particularly vulnerable to disruption from artificial light, thus effective management of lighting is critical in areas where industrial developments occur close to nesting habitat. Given the complexity of managing lighting in industry, ensuring an adequate lighting exclusion zone between the development and the beach may be the most effective strategy for limiting impacts, yet there appears to have been little focus on clearly delineating a distance which constitutes an ‘adequate’ buffer. Using arena assays, we assessed flatback turtle (Natator depressus) and green turtle (Chelonia mydas) hatchling sea-finding ability in response to three standard industrial light sources (high pressure sodium (HPSV), metal halide (MH) and fluorescent white (FW)), positioned at distances of 100, 200, 500 and 800 m. Sea-finding in both species was disrupted by all three light types when lights were positioned 200 m or closer, but not when lights were positioned ≥500 m away. However, when shielding the lights so that light glow, but not the luminaire itself, was visible from the arena, the observed sea-finding disruption was considerably reduced. Given that facilities are typically lit by numerous luminaires, our findings demonstrate that future industrial developments should be separated from nearby nesting beaches by a buffer of at least 1.5 km, as previously theorized, with all installed lighting appropriately shaded. Such measures will help minimize lighting impacts on marine turtles as extractive resource operations continue to encroach on nesting beaches around the world.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1617-1381 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (down) LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1328
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Author Last, K. S.; Hobbs, L.; Berge, J.; Brierley, A. S.; Cottier, F.
Title Moonlight Drives Ocean-Scale Mass Vertical Migration of Zooplankton during the Arctic Winter Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Current Biology Abbreviated Journal Current Biology
Volume 26 Issue 2 Pages 244-251
Keywords animals
Abstract In extreme high-latitude marine environments that are without solar illumination in winter, light-mediated patterns of biological migration have historically been considered non-existent [ 1 ]. However, diel vertical migration (DVM) of zooplankton has been shown to occur even during the darkest part of the polar night, when illumination levels are exceptionally low [ 2, 3 ]. This paradox is, as yet, unexplained. Here, we present evidence of an unexpected uniform behavior across the entire Arctic, in fjord, shelf, slope and open sea, where vertical migrations of zooplankton are driven by lunar illumination. A shift from solar-day (24-hr period) to lunar-day (24.8-hr period) vertical migration takes place in winter when the moon rises above the horizon. Further, mass sinking of zooplankton from the surface waters and accumulation at a depth of ∼50 m occurs every 29.5 days in winter, coincident with the periods of full moon. Moonlight may enable predation of zooplankton by carnivorous zooplankters, fish, and birds now known to feed during the polar night [ 4 ]. Although primary production is almost nil at this time, lunar vertical migration (LVM) may facilitate monthly pulses of carbon remineralization, as they occur continuously in illuminated mesopelagic systems [ 5 ], due to community respiration of carnivorous and detritivorous zooplankton. The extent of LVM during the winter suggests that the behavior is highly conserved and adaptive and therefore needs to be considered as “baseline” zooplankton activity in a changing Arctic ocean [ 6–9 ].
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (down) LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1329
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Author Ayaki, M.; Hattori, A.; Maruyama, Y.; Nakano, M.; Yoshimura, M.; Kitazawa, M.; Negishi, K.; Tsubota, K.
Title Protective effect of blue-light shield eyewear for adults against light pollution from self-luminous devices used at night Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 33 Issue 1 Pages 134-139
Keywords Human health
Abstract We investigated sleep quality and melatonin in 12 adults who wore blue-light shield or control eyewear 2 hours before sleep while using a self-luminous portable device, and assessed visual quality for the two eyewear types. Overnight melatonin secretion was significantly higher after using the blue-light shield (P < 0.05) than with the control eyewear. Sleep efficacy and sleep latency were significantly superior for wearers of the blue-light shield (P < 0.05 for both), and this group reported greater sleepiness during portable device use compared to those using the control eyewear. Participants rated the blue-light shield as providing acceptable visual quality.
Address a Department of Ophthalmology , Keio University School of Medicine , Shinjuku , Tokyo , Japan
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26730983 Approved no
Call Number (down) LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1330
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