toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Rajput, S.; Naithani, M.; Meena, K.; Rana, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light pollution: hidden perils in light and links to cancer Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Sleep Vigilance Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Review; Human Health  
  Abstract Light pollution is a rising global concern which impacts not only ecology but has a wide range of deleterious effect on human health as well. Artificial light at night (ALAN) has been linked to increased risk of cancers including shift workers at night. Apart from cancer, ALAN has been the cause of disrupted circadian rhythm, disturbances in sleep pattern, obesity, stress, alterations in the rhythmicity of gut microbiota and free radical damage. Melatonin, a wonder molecule dubbed as the hormone of darkness, appears to be involved in a plethora of physiological processes and abnormalities including control of sleep, circadian rhythms, retinal physiology, seasonal reproductive cycles, cancer development and growth, immune activity, antioxidation and free radical scavenging. Potential detrimental effects of artificial light are not known to all, hidden perils of light are yet to be brought in full public knowledge so that nighttime light can be dealt with effectively.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (down) UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3352  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lin, H.; Luo, S.; Huang, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Poverty estimation at the county level by combining LuoJia1-01 nighttime light data and points of interest Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Geocarto International Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract To reduce poverty, it is important to obtain accurate information on poverty conditions in a timely manner. Previous studies indicated that nighttime light products are helpful for poverty estimation. However, there exist no studies that have investigated the potential of LuoJia1-01, a new-generation nighttime light satellite with a much finer resolution (∼130 m), for analyzing poverty. In addition, nighttime light data may not reflect daytime-only socio-economic activities. To address these problems, our study first compared the performance of LuoJia1-01 and NPP-VIIRS products in poverty estimation. Next, we incorporated point of interest (POI) information so that daytime-only socio-economic activities can be considered. Our experiments indicated that LuoJia1-01 performs slightly better than NPP-VIIRS in terms of poverty estimation at county level. More importantly, we revealed that the combination of POIs and nighttime light products can moderately increase the average estimation accuracies. These findings are expected to support poverty monitoring over large regions for long periods, which cannot be fulfilled by traditional household surveys and census.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (down) UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3355  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Dunn, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dark Design: A New Framework for Advocacy and Creativity for the Nocturnal Commons Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication The International Journal of Design in Society Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 14 Issue 4 Pages 20-30  
  Keywords Conservation; Darkness; Design; Lighting; Planning; Society  
  Abstract Urbanization continues to provide habitat for more and more of the planet’s human population. Accompanying this process are the energy, transport, and service infrastructures that support urban life. Enmeshed in these networks is artificial illumination and its unintended consequences. Light pollution, for instance, accounts for a growing global carbon footprint, yet more efficient artificial lighting methods using LEDs have resulted in increasingly higher levels of brightness at night. This is altering natural cycles of light and dark, directly impacting on the circadian rhythms of our bodies and having disastrous effects upon other species and their ecosystems. This issue of critical importance has been referred to by some scientists as a hidden global challenge but the public awareness and understanding of it is negligible. Where is design in addressing such poor performance? The growing problem of how we perceive darkness and the attempts to manage it, typically through artificial illumination, requires new design strategies to create viable alternatives to current pathways. How can we advocate for the “nocturnal commons” when the majority of society does not even know what is disappearing or understand the implications? This article proposes the concept of “Dark Design” to set out a new framework for advocacy and creativity to raise awareness of these complex issues and address them. By bringing together a diverse range of approaches, “Dark Design” seeks to establish a field for emerging principles and practices to design with darkness rather than against it. In doing so, it calls for the important and urgent need for design to commit, act and engage others in the future of our planet, its people, and non-human species.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (down) UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3356  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Iloanugo, U.; Dutta, I.; Haque, M. E. url  openurl
  Title Do Amnesty Policies Reduce Conict? Evidence from the Niger-Delta Amnesty Program Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Economics Discussion Paper Series Abbreviated Journal EDP  
  Volume Issue 2011 Pages  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract We examine the effect of the Niger-Delta Amnesty Program on oil related conflict in Nigeria. The policy enacted in August 2009 made concessions to rebel groups in the oil producing region in exchange for peace. Using a difference-in-difference strategy we compare conflict in Local Government Areas with and without oil fields in the Niger-Delta region. We find robust evidence that amnesty policy reduced the rebel and militia activities significantly. However, the reduction of conflict was not long lasting. We also find evidence of a peace dividend in terms of increase in economic activities — as measured through night time luminosity data — in Niger-Delta LGAs with oil fields after the policy. We explain our results through a simple analytical model.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (down) UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3365  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kumar, S.; Singh, V. K.; Nath, P.; PC, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An overview of anthropogenic electromagnetic radiations as risk to pollinators and pollination Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Applied and Natural Science Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 12 Issue 4 Pages 675-681  
  Keywords Animals; Ecology; Review  
  Abstract Pollinators play a key functional role in most terrestrial ecosystems and provide important ecosystem service to maintain wild plant communities and agricultural productivity. The decline in pollinators has been related to anthropogenic disturbances such as habitat loss, alterations in land use, and climate change. The surge in mobile telephony has led to a marked increase in electromagnetic fields in the atmosphere, which may affect pollinator and pollination. Several laboratory studies have reported negative effects of electromagnetic radiation on reproduction, development, and navigation in insects. The abundance of insects such as the beetle, wasp, and hoverfly, decreased with electromagnetic radiation(EMR), whereas the abundance of underground-nesting wild bees and bee fly unexpectedly increased with EMR. Potential risks for pollinators and biodiversity are anthropogenic radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (AREMR) (light, radiofrequency). Artificial light at night (ALAN) can alter the function and abundance of pollinator. Evidence of impacts of AREMR is not adequate due to a lack of high quality, field-realistic studies. Whether pollinators experiencing a threat of ALAN or AREMR, while major knowledge gap exists. In this review, the effects of EMR on wild pollinator groups such as wild bees, hoverflies, bee flies, beetles, butterflies, and wasps etc. have been highlighted. Researchers are also recommended for further study on the effects of EMR on insects. This study will be significant to conserve pollinators and other important insects.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (down) UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3366  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: