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Author Mulvin, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Media Prophylaxis: Night Modes and the Politics of Preventing Harm Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Information & Culture Abbreviated Journal Information & Culture  
  Volume 53 Issue 2 Pages 175-202  
  Keywords Human Health; Society  
  Abstract This article develops the term “media prophylaxis” to analyze the ways technologies are applied to challenges of calibrating one’s body with its environment and as defenses against endemic, human-made harms. In recent years, self-illuminated screens (like those of computers, phones, and tablets) have been identified by scientists, journalists, and concerned individuals as particularly pernicious sources of sleep-disrupting light. By tracing the history of circadian research, the effects of light on sleep patterns, and the recent appearance of software like “f.lux,” Apple’s “Night Shift,” and “Twilight,” this article shows how media-prophylactic technologies can individualize responsibility for preventing harm while simultaneously surfacing otherwise ignored forms of chronic suffering.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2164-8034 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1853  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Solano-Lamphar, H.A.; Kocifaj, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Numerical research on the effects the skyglow could have in phytochromes and RQE photoreceptors of plants Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Environmental Management Abbreviated Journal J Environ Manage  
  Volume 209 Issue Pages 484-494  
  Keywords Plants; Skyglow  
  Abstract The increase of artificial light at night has a terrible impact on organisms with nightlife patterns such as a migration, nutrition, reproduction and collective interaction. Plants are not free from this issue as they have life cycle events occurring not only yearly but also daily. Such events relate to daytime variations with seasons in which the flowers of deciduous trees bloom and the leaves of certain trees fall off and change color. A response of plants to artificial light at night still remains poorly quantified; but recent scientific research suggest that skyglow can disturb plants processes. For instance, low levels of light affect deciduous plants, which shed their leaves as days grow short in the fall. In this paper we model skyglow considering the features of artificial light that can affect natural processes of plants during the night. A case-study was conducted to mimic skyglow effects in real location for which experimental data exist. In our numerical simulations we found that some lighting systems can have an effect on plant photoreceptors and affect the phenology of plants. Specifically, the lamps that emit the electromagnetic energy in a wide spectral range can have greater effect on the photosensitivity of the plants. We believe the results obtained here will motivate botanists to make a targeted experiment to verify or challenge our findings. If the night light can change plant behavior under some conditions, it can have significant implications in botany, biology, or even agriculture.  
  Address ICA, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska Road 9, 845 03, Bratislava, Slovak Republic; Faculty of Mathematics, Physics, and Informatics, Comenius University, Mlynska Dolina, 842 48, Bratislava, Slovakia. Electronic address: kocifaj@savba.sk  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0301-4797 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29316469 Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1854  
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Author Hu, Z.; Hu, H.; Huang, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Association between nighttime artificial light pollution and sea turtle nest density along Florida coast: A geospatial study using VIIRS remote sensing data Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) Abbreviated Journal Environ Pollut  
  Volume 239 Issue Pages 30-42  
  Keywords Animals; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Artificial lighting at night has becoming a new type of pollution posing an important anthropogenic environmental pressure on organisms. The objective of this research was to examine the potential association between nighttime artificial light pollution and nest densities of the three main sea turtle species along Florida beaches, including green turtles, loggerheads, and leatherbacks. Sea turtle survey data was obtained from the “Florida Statewide Nesting Beach Survey program”. We used the new generation of satellite sensor “Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS)” (version 1 D/N Band) nighttime annual average radiance composite image data. We defined light pollution as artificial light brightness greater than 10% of the natural sky brightness above 45 degrees of elevation (>1.14x10(-11) Wm(-2)sr(-1)). We fitted a generalized linear model (GLM), a GLM with eigenvectors spatial filtering (GLM-ESF), and a generalized estimating equations (GEE) approach for each species to examine the potential correlation of nest density with light pollution. Our models are robust and reliable in terms of the ability to deal with data distribution and spatial autocorrelation (SA) issues violating model assumptions. All three models found that nest density is significantly negatively correlated with light pollution for each sea turtle species: the higher light pollution, the lower nest density. The two spatially extended models (GLM-ESF and GEE) show that light pollution influences nest density in a descending order from green turtles, to loggerheads, and then to leatherbacks. The research findings have an implication for sea turtle conservation policy and ordinance making. Near-coastal lights-out ordinances and other approaches to shield lights can protect sea turtles and their nests. The VIIRS DNB light data, having significant improvements over comparable data by its predecessor, the DMSP-OLS, shows promise for continued and improved research about ecological effects of artificial light pollution.  
  Address Department of Computing Sciences, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, Corpus Christi, TX, USA. Electronic address: Lucy.Huang@tamucc.edu  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29649758 Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1855  
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Author Farnworth, B.; Innes, J.; Kelly, C.; Littler, R.; Waas, J.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Photons and foraging: Artificial light at night generates avoidance behaviour in male, but not female, New Zealand weta Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) Abbreviated Journal Environ Pollut  
  Volume 236 Issue Pages 82-90  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Avoiding foraging under increased predation risk is a common anti-predator behaviour. Using artificial light to amplify predation risk at ecologically valuable sites has been proposed to deter introduced mice (Mus musculus) and ship rats (Rattus rattus) from degrading biodiversity in island ecosystems. However, light may adversely affect native species; in particular, little is known about invertebrate responses to altered lighting regimes. We investigated how endemic orthopterans responded to artificial light at Maungatautari Ecological Island (Waikato, New Zealand). We predicted that based on their nocturnal behaviour, ecology and evolutionary history, tree weta (Hemideina thoracica) and cave weta (Rhaphidophoridae) would reduce their activity under illumination. Experimental stations (n=15) experienced three evenings under each treatment (order randomised): (a) light (illuminated LED fixture), (b) dark (unilluminated LED fixture) and (c) baseline (no lighting fixture). Weta visitation rates were analysed from images captured on infra-red trail cameras set up at each station. Light significantly reduced the number of observations of cave (71.7% reduction) and tree weta (87.5% reduction). In observations where sex was distinguishable (53% of all visits), male tree weta were observed significantly more often (85% of visits) than females (15% of visits) and while males avoided illuminated sites, no detectable difference was observed across treatments for females. Sex could not be distinguished for cave weta. Our findings have implications for the use of light as a novel pest management strategy, and for the conservation of invertebrate diversity and abundance within natural and urban ecosystems worldwide that may be affected by light pollution.  
  Address Biological Sciences, School of Science, University of Waikato, Private Bag 3105, Hamilton, New Zealand. Electronic address: waasur@waikato.ac.nz  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29414377 Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1856  
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Author Sanders, D.; Gaston, K.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title How ecological communities respond to artificial light at night Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol  
  Volume 329 Issue 8-9 Pages 394-400  
  Keywords Ecology  
  Abstract Many ecosystems worldwide are exposed to artificial light at night (ALAN), from streetlights and other sources, and a wide range of organisms has been shown to respond to this anthropogenic pressure. This raises concerns about the consequences for major ecosystem functions and their stability. However, there is limited understanding of how whole ecological communities respond to ALAN, and this cannot be gained simply by making predictions from observed single species physiological, behavioral, or ecological responses. Research needs to include an important building block of ecological communities, namely the interactions between species that drive ecological and evolutionary processes in ecosystems. Here, we summarize current knowledge about community responses to ALAN and illustrate different pathways and their impact on ecosystem functioning and stability. We discuss that documentation of the impact of ALAN on species interaction networks and trait distributions provides useful tools to link changes in community structure to ecosystem functions. Finally, we suggest several approaches to advance research that will link the diverse impact of ALAN to changes in ecosystems.  
  Address Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin, Institute for Advanced Study, Berlin, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29656458 Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1857  
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