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Author Garcia-Saenz, A.; Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Espinosa, A.; Valentin, A.; Aragonés, N.; Llorca, J.; Amiano, P.; Martín Sánchez, V.; Guevara, M.; Capelo, R.; Tardón, A.; Peiró-Perez, R.; Jiménez-Moleón, J.J.; Roca-Barceló, A.; Pérez-Gómez, B.; Dierssen-Sotos, T.; Fernández-Villa, T.; Moreno-Iribas, C.; Moreno, V.; García-Pérez, J.; Castaño-Vinyals, G.; Pollán, M.; Aubé, M.; Kogevinas, M.
Title Evaluating the Association between Artificial Light-at-Night Exposure and Breast and Prostate Cancer Risk in Spain (MCC-Spain Study) Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Environmental Health Perspectives Abbreviated Journal
Volume 126 Issue 04 Pages
Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing
Abstract Background: Night shift work, exposure to light at night (ALAN) and circadian disruption may increase the risk of hormone-dependent cancers.

Objectives: We evaluated the association of exposure to ALAN during sleeping time with breast and prostate cancer in a population based multicase–control study (MCC-Spain), among subjects who had never worked at night. We evaluated chronotype, a characteristic that may relate to adaptation to light at night.

Methods: We enrolled 1,219 breast cancer cases, 1,385 female controls, 623 prostate cancer cases, and 879 male controls from 11 Spanish regions in 2008–2013. Indoor ALAN information was obtained through questionnaires. Outdoor ALAN was analyzed using images from the International Space Station (ISS) available for Barcelona and Madrid for 2012–2013, including data of remotely sensed upward light intensity and blue light spectrum information for each geocoded longest residence of each MCC-Spain subject.

Results: Among Barcelona and Madrid participants with information on both indoor and outdoor ALAN, exposure to outdoor ALAN in the blue light spectrum was associated with breast cancer [adjusted odds ratio (OR) for highest vs. lowest tertile, OR=1.47; 95% CI: 1.00, 2.17] and prostate cancer (OR=2.05; 95% CI: 1.38, 3.03). In contrast, those exposed to the highest versus lowest intensity of outdoor ALAN were more likely to be controls than cases, particularly for prostate cancer. Compared with those who reported sleeping in total darkness, men who slept in “quite illuminated” bedrooms had a higher risk of prostate cancer (OR=2.79; 95% CI: 1.55, 5.04), whereas women had a slightly lower risk of breast cancer (OR=0.77; 95% CI: 0.39, 1.51).

Conclusion: Both prostate and breast cancer were associated with high estimated exposure to outdoor ALAN in the blue-enriched light spectrum.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0091-6765 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1871
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Author Li, X.; Elvidge, C.; Zhou, Y.; Cao, C.; Warner, T.
Title Remote sensing of night-time light Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Remote Sensing
Volume 38 Issue 21 Pages 5855-5859
Keywords Remote Sensing; Commentary
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0143-1161 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1872
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Author Li, X.; Li, D.; Xu, H.; Wu, C.
Title Intercalibration between DMSP/OLS and VIIRS night-time light images to evaluate city light dynamics of Syria’s major human settlement during Syrian Civil War Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Remote Sensing
Volume 38 Issue 21 Pages 5934-5951
Keywords Remote Sensing; Instrumentation; Society
Abstract Monthly composites of night-time light acquired from the Meteorological Satellite Program’s Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) had been used to evaluate socio-economic dynamics and human rights during the Syrian Civil War, which started in March 2011. However, DMSP/OLS monthly composites are not available subsequent to February 2014, and the only available night-time light composites for that period were acquired from the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite’s Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (Suomi NPP/VIIRS). This article proposes an intercalibration model to simulate DMSP/OLS composites from the VIIRS day-and-night band (DNB) composites, by using a power function for radiometric degradation and a Gaussian low pass filter for spatial degradation. The DMSP/OLS data and the simulated DMSP/OLS data were combined to estimate the city light dynamics in Syria’s major human settlement between March 2011 and January 2017. Our analysis shows that Syria’s major human settlement lost about 79% of its city light by January 2017, with Aleppo, Daraa, Deir ez-Zor, and Idlib provinces losing 89%, 90%, 96%, and 99% of their light, respectively, indicating that these four provinces were most affected by the war. We also found that the city light in Syria and 12 provinces rebounded from early 2016 to January 2017, possibly as a result of the peace negotiation signed in Geneva.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0143-1161 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1873
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Author Li, X.; Li, D.
Title Can night-time light images play a role in evaluating the Syrian Crisis? Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication International Journal of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Remote Sensing
Volume 35 Issue 18 Pages 6648-6661
Keywords Remote Sensing; Society
Abstract This study investigates whether night-time light images acquired from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program’s Operational Linescan System provide spatial and temporal insight with regard to the humanitarian aspects of the Syrian crisis. Evaluating the ongoing crisis in Syria is challenging since reliable witness reports are hard to gather in a war zone. Therefore satellite images, as one of the few sources of objective information, are potentially of great importance. We used 38 monthly Defense Meteorological Satellite Program’s Operational Linescan System composites covering the period between January 2008 and February 2014. The results indicate that night-time light and lit area in Syria declined by about 74% and 73%, respectively, between March 2011 and February 2014. In 12 of 14 provinces, night-time light declined by >60%. Damascus and Quneitra are the exceptions, with night-time light having declined only by about 35%. Notably, the number of internally displaced persons (IDPs) of each province shows a linear correlation with night-time light loss, with an R2 value of 0.52. Through clustering the time series images, we found that the international border of Syria represents a distinct boundary between regions of differing night-time light spatiotemporal patterns. The contrast across the border increases as the region studied encompasses a wider zone on either side of the border. These findings lend support to the hypothesis that night-time light can be a useful source for monitoring humanitarian crises such as that unfolding in Syria.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0143-1161 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1874
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Author Li, X.; Zhang, R.; Huang, C.; Li, D.
Title Detecting 2014 Northern Iraq Insurgency using night-time light imagery Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication International Journal of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Remote Sensing
Volume 36 Issue 13 Pages 3446-3458
Keywords Remote Sensing; Society
Abstract The territory controlled by the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) has grown rapidly since the start of the Syrian Civil War. In 2014, ISIS expanded its control into Northern Iraq, leading to a major humanitarian crisis in the region. This study makes use of night-time light images to detect the ISIS offensive against Iraq in 2014. We developed an algorithm to separate city lights from oilfield lights, based on an urban extent map. The image analysis indicates that all Northern Iraqi provinces experienced a large reduction in city lighting, varying from 16% to 93%. This reduction is especially evident in the three ISIS-controlled provinces, Al-Anbar, Saladin, and Ninawa, where the reduction of city lighting from May to December 2014 was 59%, 50%, and 93%, respectively. Most of the ISIS-controlled cities, including Mosul and Tikrit, experienced a loss of more than 90% in city lighting after being seized by ISIS, while the cities controlled by the Iraqi security forces (ISF) did not lose as much lighting. In contrast, the city lights in Ar Raqqa, Syria, ISIS’s de facto capital, did not show a decline after that region was seized by ISIS. We conclude that the conflict in Northern Iraq has resulted in a major loss of city lighting and that this loss is most likely due to lack of access to the Iraqi electricity supply grid rather than a deliberate ISIS strategy.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0143-1161 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1875
Permanent link to this record