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Author Li, D.; Zhao, X.; Li, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Remote sensing of human beings – a perspective from nighttime light Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Geo-spatial Information Science Abbreviated Journal Geo-spatial Information Science  
  Volume 19 Issue 1 Pages 69-79  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract City lights, fishing boats, and oil fields are the major sources of nighttime lights, therefore the nighttime light images provide a unique source to map human beings and their activities from outer space. While most of the scholars focused on application of nighttime light remote sensing in urbanization and regional development, the actual fields are much wider. This paper summarized the applications of nighttime light remote sensing into fields such as the estimation of socioeconomic parameters, monitoring urbanization, evaluation of important events, analyzing light pollution, fishery, etc. For estimation of socioeconomic parameters, the most promising progress is that Gross Domestic Product and its growth rate have been estimated with statistical data and nighttime light data using econometric models. For monitoring urbanization, urban area and its dynamics can be extracted using different classification methods, and spatial analysis has been employed to map urban agglomeration. As sharp changes of nighttime light are associated with important socioeconomic events, the images have been used to evaluate humanitarian disasters, especially in the current Syrian and Iraqi wars. Light pollution is another hotspot of nighttime light application, as the night light is related to some diseases and abnormal behavior of animals, and the nighttime light images can provide light pollution information on large scales so that it is much easier to analyze the effects of light pollutions. In each field, we listed typical cases of the applications. At last, future studies of nighttime light remote sensing have been predicted.  
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  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1009-5020 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1878  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Duriscoe, D.M.; Anderson, S.J.; Luginbuhl, C.B.; Baugh, K.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A simplified model of all-sky artificial sky glow derived from VIIRS Day/Night band data Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer  
  Volume 214 Issue Pages 133-145  
  Keywords Skyglow; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract We present a simplified method using geographic analysis tools to predict the average artificial luminance over the hemisphere of the night sky, expressed as a ratio to the natural condition. The VIIRS Day/Night Band upward radiance data from the Suomi NPP orbiting satellite was used for input to the model. The method is based upon a relation between sky glow brightness and the distance from the observer to the source of upward radiance. This relationship was developed using a Garstang radiative transfer model with Day/Night Band data as input, then refined and calibrated with ground-based all-sky V-band photometric data taken under cloudless and low atmospheric aerosol conditions. An excellent correlation was found between observed sky quality and the predicted values from the remotely sensed data. Thematic maps of large regions of the earth showing predicted artificial V-band sky brightness may be quickly generated with modest computing resources. We have found a fast and accurate method based on previous work to model all-sky quality. We provide limitations to this method. The proposed model meets requirements needed by decision makers and land managers of an easy to interpret and understand metric of sky quality.  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1879  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Tabor, R.A.; Bell, A.T.C.; Lantz, D.W.; Gregersen, C.N.; Berge, H.B.; Hawkins, D.K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Phototaxic Behavior of Subyearling Salmonids in the Nearshore Area of Two Urban Lakes in Western Washington State Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Transactions of the American Fisheries Society Abbreviated Journal Transactions of the American Fisheries Society  
  Volume 146 Issue 4 Pages 753-761  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract We conducted field experiments in the nearshore area of two urban lakes (Lake Washington and Lake Sammamish) in western Washington to test the attractive quality of artificial nighttime lighting to subyearling salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. In both lakes, experimental trials were conducted along a uniform 156‐m shoreline section twice a month (one night with lights and one control night without lights) from March to May to correspond with peak nearshore rearing of subyearling salmonids. We examined the effects of three light intensities on nearshore fish abundance: (1) no light, (2) dim light (maximum, 5.0 lx), and (3) bright light (maximum, 50.0 lx). These were compared with abundances from control nights without light treatments. Beach seining was used to determine fish abundance. For each month, the total number of subyearling salmonids (Chinook Salmon O. tshawytscha, Coho Salmon O. kisutch, and Sockeye Salmon O. nerka combined) was greater on the lighted nights (all treatments combined) than it was on the control nights. In both lakes, the most subyearling salmonids were collected in the bright‐light treatments, an intermediate amount in the dim‐light treatments, and few in the no‐light treatments. In some instances, subyearling salmonid abundances in the bright‐light treatments were more than 10 times greater than in the no‐light treatments. The effect of nighttime artificial lighting was generally more pronounced in March than in April or May. The results support our hypothesis that subyearling salmonids exhibit nocturnal phototaxic behavior when exposed to elevated nighttime lighting. A major concern of artificial nighttime lighting for subyearling salmonids is the potential for an increased predation risk, and we believe the prudent management goal would be to minimize artificial nighttime lighting.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-8487 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1880  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Eriksen, A.; Wabakken, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Activity patterns at the Arctic Circle: nocturnal eagle owls and interspecific interactions during continuous midsummer daylight Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Avian Biology Abbreviated Journal J Avian Biol  
  Volume 49 Issue 7 Pages e01781  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Circadian rhythms result from adaptations to biotic and abiotic environmental conditions that cycle through the day, such as light, temperature, or temporal overlap between interacting species. At high latitudes, close to or beyond the polar circles, uninterrupted midsummer daylight may pose a challenge to the circadian rhythms of otherwise nocturnal species, such as eagle owls Bubo bubo. By non‐invasive field methods, we studied eagle owl activity in light of their interactions with their main prey the water vole Arvicola amphibius, and their competitor the white‐tailed eagle Haliaeetus albicilla during continuous midsummer daylight on open, treeless islands in coastal Northern Norway. We evaluated circadian rhythms, temporal overlap, exposure, and spatial distribution. The owls maintained a nocturnal activity pattern, possibly because slightly dimmer light around midnight offered favourable hunting conditions. The eagles were active throughout the 24‐hour period as opposed to the strictly diurnal rhythm reported elsewhere, thus increasing temporal overlap and the potential for interference competition between the two avian predators. This may indicate an asymmetry, with the owls facing the highest cost of interference competition. The presence of eagles combined with constant daylight in this open landscape may make the owls vulnerable to interspecific aggression, and contrary to the available literature, eagle owls rarely exposed themselves visually during territorial calls, possibly to avoid detection by eagles. We found indications of spatial segregation between owls and eagles reflecting differences in main prey, possibly in combination with habitat‐mediated avoidance. Eagle owl vocal activity peaked in the evening before a nocturnal peak in visual observations, when owls were active hunting, consistent with the hypothesis of a dusk chorus in nocturnal bird species. The owls may have had to trade‐off between calling and foraging during the few hours around midnight when slightly dimmer light reduced the detection risk while also providing better hunting conditions.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0908-8857 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1881  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ayuga, C.E.T.; Zamorano, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title LICA AstroCalc, a software to analyze the impact of artificial light: Extracting parameters from the spectra of street and indoor lamps Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer  
  Volume 214 Issue Pages 33-38  
  Keywords Vision; Lighting; Instrumentation  
  Abstract The night sky spectra of light-polluted areas is the result of the artificial light scattered back from the atmosphere and the reemission of the light after reflections in painted surfaces. This emission comes mainly from street and decorative lamps. We have built an extensive database of lamps spectra covering from UV to near IR and the software needed to analyze them. We describe the LICA-AstroCalc free software that is a user friendly GUI tool to extract information from our database spectra or any other user provided spectrum. The software also includes the complete color database of paints from NCS comprising 1950 types. This helps to evaluate how different colors modify the reflected spectra from different lamps. All spectroscopic measurements have been validated with recommendations from CIELAB and ISO from NCS database.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1882  
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