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Author Guetté, A.; Godet, L.; Juigner, M.; Robin, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Worldwide increase in Artificial Light At Night around protected areas and within biodiversity hotspots Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation  
  Volume 223 Issue Pages 97-103  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Ecology; Conservation  
  Abstract Artificial Light At Night (ALAN) has several adverse impacts on biodiversity, and it has been recently used as a proxy to monitor human encroachment on landscapes at large spatial scales. The extent to which ALAN affects protected areas (PAs) and biodiversity hotspots (BHs) remains however untested at large spatial scales. We used this proxy to assess the spatial and temporal trends in the anthropization at a global scale within and around PAs and BHs. We found that ALAN is low and stable over time within PAs, but is the highest in a first outer belt (<25 km) around PAs, and tends to increase in a second outer belt (25–75 km). In the meantime, ALAN is higher within BHs than outside, and is even the highest and increasing over time in an inner belt, close to their periphery. Our results suggest that although PAs are creating safety zones in terms of ALAN, they tend to be more and more isolated from each other by a concentric human encroachment. In contrast, BHs are submitted to an increasing human pressure, especially in their inner periphery. Overall, we suggest integrating ALAN in large-scale conservation policies.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1890  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Borck, P.C.; Batista, T.M.; Vettorazzi, J.F.; Soares, G.M.; Lubaczeuski, C.; Guan, D.; Boschero, A.C.; Vieira, E.; Lazar, M.A.; Carneiro, E.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nighttime light exposure enhances Rev-erbalpha-targeting microRNAs and contributes to hepatic steatosis Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental Abbreviated Journal Metabolism  
  Volume 85 Issue Pages 250-258  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The exposure to artificial light at night (ALAN) disrupts the biological rhythms and has been associated with the development of metabolic syndrome. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) display a critical role in fine-tuning the circadian system and energy metabolism. In this study, we aimed to assess whether altered miRNAs expression in the liver underlies metabolic disorders caused by disrupted biological rhythms. RESULTS: We found that C3H/HePas mice exposed to ALAN developed obesity, and hepatic steatosis, which was paralleled by decreased expression of Rev-erbalpha and up-regulation of its lipogenic targets ACL and FAS in liver. Furthermore, the expression of Rev-erbalpha-targeting miRNAs, miR-140-5p, 185-5p, 326-5p and 328-5p were increased in this group. Consistently, overexpression of these miRNAs in primary hepatocytes reduced Rev-erbalpha expression at the mRNA and protein levels. Importantly, overexpression of Rev-erbalpha-targeting miRNAs increased mRNA levels of Acly and Fasn. CONCLUSION: Thus, altered miRNA profile is an important mechanism underlying the disruption of the peripheral clock caused by exposure to ALAN, which could lead to hepatic steatosis.  
  Address Obesity and Comorbidities Research Center, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas/UNICAMP, Campinas, SP, Brazil; Department of Structural and Functional Biology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas/UNICAMP, Campinas, SP, Brazil  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0026-0495 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29751019 Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1891  
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Author Willett, S. openurl 
  Title How many bioluminescent insects would be needed to produce the same level of light pollution as London? Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Interdisciplinary Science Topics Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 7 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Lighting; Animals  
  Abstract This paper determines how many light emitting Pyrophorus noctilucus would be required to produce the same level of light, and so the same amount of light pollution, as London. It was determined that if one P. noctilucos emitted 0.00153 lumens, it would take 2.940x1011 of them to produce the 449x106 lumen emitted by London. This number of bugs equates to an area of approximately 1.911x108 m2 which is 8 times smaller than the size of London.  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1892  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jong, M. de; Eertwegh, L. van den; Beskers, R.E.; Vries, P.P. de; Spoelstra, K.; Visser, M.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Timing of Avian Breeding in an Urbanised World Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Ardea Abbreviated Journal Ardea  
  Volume 106 Issue 1 Pages 31-38  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract A large part of the world is urbanised, and the process of urbanisation is ongoing. This causes dramatic alterations of species' habitat such as increased night light, sound levels and temperature, along with direct disturbance by human activity. We used eight years of citizen science data from ten common bird species breeding in nest boxes throughout The Netherlands to study the relationship between urbanisation and a key life history trait, timing of breeding. We used nightly light levels in the form of sky brightness and light emission as a proxy for urbanisation as the dramatic change of the night-time environment is a prominent effect of urbanisation. We expected birds to lay earlier in areas with more light at night, i.e. in more urbanised areas. We found, however, no relationship between light levels and seasonal timing in the ten species studied. A limitation of our study is that there was only limited data for the areas that were urbanised most (e.g. inside cities). Most nest box study areas are located in areas with a limited level of urbanisation, and hence with relatively low light levels of light at night. The lack of data on breeding birds in more urbanised environments, which is a rapidly expanding habitat for an increasing number of species worldwide, should be the focus of attention and citizen science would be highly suitable to also provide data for such areas.  
  Address  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0373-2266 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1893  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cruz, L.M.; Shillinger, G.L.; Robinson, N.J.; Tomillo, P.S.; Paladino, F.V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of light intensity and wavelength on the in-water orientation of olive ridley turtle hatchlings Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology  
  Volume 505 Issue Pages 52-56  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Light pollution, associated with coastal development, poses a growing threat to sea turtles. Hatchlings are particularly affected during their crawl to the ocean since they exhibit phototaxis and may move towards or be disoriented by artificial lights. Although much is known about how hatchlings respond to artificial light while crawling to the ocean, far less is known about their response after reaching the water. Here, we investigate how hatchling olive ridley turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea) held in artificial pools responded to light of different wavelengths (red, 720 nm; yellow, 660 nm and green, 520 nm) and intensities (0.1–3.3 lx, mean 0.87 lx, SD = 0.85, 10.3–45.9 lx, mean 15.75 lx,SD = 7.12; 47.5–84.2 lx; mean 52.02 lx, SD = 9.11; 91.3–140.8 lx, mean 105 lx, SD = 13.24; 150.1–623 lx, mean 172.18 lx, SD = 73.42). When no light or red light below 39 lx was present, hatchlings oriented at a mean angle of 180° from true north and did not orient towards any discernable feature. However, hatchlings swam towards the light at intensities of red light above 39 lx, yellow light above 10 lx and green light above 5 lx. Our findings indicate that sea turtles will swim towards artificial lights even after reaching the water. Thus, we recommend light mitigation efforts should extend beyond nesting beaches and into the associated oceanic habitats.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-0981 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1894  
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