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Author Li, Q.; Zheng, T.; Holford, T.R.; Boyle, P.; Zhang, Y.; Dai, M.
Title Light at night and breast cancer risk: results from a population-based case-control study in Connecticut, USA Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Cancer Causes & Control : CCC Abbreviated Journal Cancer Causes Control
Volume 21 Issue 12 Pages 2281-2285
Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology/*etiology; Carcinoma/epidemiology/*etiology; Case-Control Studies; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Connecticut/epidemiology; Female; Humans; *Light/adverse effects; Middle Aged; Population; Questionnaires; Risk Factors; United States/epidemiology; Work Schedule Tolerance/physiology; Oncogenesis
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To investigate the potential association between domestic exposure to light at night (LAN) and the risk of human breast cancer. METHODS: A case-control study of female breast cancer was conducted in Connecticut. A total of 363 incident breast cancer cases and 356 age frequency-matched controls were interviewed using a standardized, structured questionnaire to obtain information on sleeping patterns and bedroom light environment. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by unconditional multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS: A non-significantly increased risk of breast cancer was observed among postmenopausal women for those keeping lights on while sleeping (OR = 1.4, 95% CI 0.7, 2.7), those who reported mainly sleeping in the daytime (OR = 1.4, 95% CI 0.5, 4.3), and those not drawing the curtains/window shades while sleeping at night (OR = 1.2, 95% CI 0.8, 1.9). CONCLUSION: The results from this study suggest a potential increased risk of breast cancer associated with domestic exposure to LAN. Further studies with larger sample size are needed to confirm the results.
Address Department of Social Medicine, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0957-5243 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference (up)
Notes PMID:20927578; PMCID:PMC3154700 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 161
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Author Yasuniwa, Y.; Izumi, H.; Wang, K.-Y.; Shimajiri, S.; Sasaguri, Y.; Kawai, K.; Kasai, H.; Shimada, T.; Miyake, K.; Kashiwagi, E.; Hirano, G.; Kidani, A.; Akiyama, M.; Han, B.; Wu, Y.; Ieiri, I.; Higuchi, S.; Kohno, K.
Title Circadian disruption accelerates tumor growth and angio/stromagenesis through a Wnt signaling pathway Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 5 Issue 12 Pages e15330
Keywords Animals; *Circadian Rhythm; Disease Progression; *Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic; HeLa Cells; Humans; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Mice, Nude; Neoplasm Transplantation; Neoplasms/*pathology; *Neovascularization, Pathologic; Nerve Tissue Proteins/metabolism; Skin/metabolism; Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/metabolism; Wnt Proteins/*metabolism; Oncogenesis
Abstract Epidemiologic studies show a high incidence of cancer in shift workers, suggesting a possible relationship between circadian rhythms and tumorigenesis. However, the precise molecular mechanism played by circadian rhythms in tumor progression is not known. To identify the possible mechanisms underlying tumor progression related to circadian rhythms, we set up nude mouse xenograft models. HeLa cells were injected in nude mice and nude mice were moved to two different cases, one case is exposed to a 24-hour light cycle (L/L), the other is a more “normal” 12-hour light/dark cycle (L/D). We found a significant increase in tumor volume in the L/L group compared with the L/D group. In addition, tumor microvessels and stroma were strongly increased in L/L mice. Although there was a hypervascularization in L/L tumors, there was no associated increase in the production of vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF). DNA microarray analysis showed enhanced expression of WNT10A, and our subsequent study revealed that WNT10A stimulates the growth of both microvascular endothelial cells and fibroblasts in tumors from light-stressed mice, along with marked increases in angio/stromagenesis. Only the tumor stroma stained positive for WNT10A and WNT10A is also highly expressed in keloid dermal fibroblasts but not in normal dermal fibroblasts indicated that WNT10A may be a novel angio/stromagenic growth factor. These findings suggest that circadian disruption induces the progression of malignant tumors via a Wnt signaling pathway.
Address Department of Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference (up)
Notes PMID:21203463; PMCID:PMC3009728 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 162
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Author Kloog, I.; Haim, A.; Stevens, R.G.; Portnov, B.A.
Title Global co-distribution of light at night (LAN) and cancers of prostate, colon, and lung in men Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 26 Issue 1 Pages 108-125
Keywords Circadian Rhythm; Colonic Neoplasms/*epidemiology; Electricity; Humans; Incidence; *Light; Lung Neoplasms/*epidemiology; Male; Prostatic Neoplasms/*epidemiology; Risk Factors; Urban Population; World Health; Oncogenesis
Abstract The incidence rates of cancers in men differ by countries of the world. We compared the incidence rates of three of the most common cancers (prostate, lung, and colon) in men residing in 164 different countries with the population-weighted light at night (LAN) exposure and with several developmental and environmental indicators, including per capita income, percent urban population, and electricity consumption. The estimate of per capita LAN exposure was a novel aspect of this study. Both ordinary least squares (OLS) and spatial error (SE) regression models were used in the analysis. We found a significant positive association between population exposure to LAN and incidence rates of prostate cancer, but no such association with lung cancer or colon cancer. The prostate cancer result is consistent with a biological theory and a limited number of previous studies of circadian disruption and risk. The LAN-prostate cancer connection is postulated to be due to suppression of melatonin and/or disruption of clock gene function. An analysis holding other variables at average values across the 164 countries yielded a risk of prostate cancer in the highest LAN-exposed countries 110% higher than in the lowest LAN exposed countries. This observed association is a necessary condition for a potentially large effect of LAN on risk of prostate cancer. However, it is not sufficient due to potential confounding by factors that increase the risk of prostate cancer and are also associated with LAN among the studied countries.
Address Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Management, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference (up)
Notes PMID:19142761 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 163
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Author Davis, S.; Mirick, D.K.; Stevens, R.G.
Title Night Shift Work, Light at Night, and Risk of Breast Cancer Type Journal Article
Year 2001 Publication JNCI Journal of the National Cancer Institute Abbreviated Journal JNCI Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Volume 93 Issue 20 Pages 1557-1562
Keywords light at night; oncogenesis; melatonin; shiftwork; breast cancer; *Cancer
Abstract Exposure to light at night may increase the risk of breast cancer by suppressing the normal nocturnal production of melatonin by the pineal gland, which, in turn, could increase the release of estrogen by the ovaries. This study investigated whether such exposure is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer in women. Methods: Case patients (n = 813), aged 20–74 years, were diagnosed from November 1992 through March 1995; control subjects (n = 793) were identified by random-digit dialing and were frequency matched according to 5-year age groups. An in-person interview was used to gather information on sleep habits and bedroom lighting environment in the 10 years before diagnosis and lifetime occupational history. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by use of conditional logistic regression, with adjustment for other potential risk factors. Results: Breast cancer risk was increased among subjects who frequently did not sleep during the period of the night when melatonin levels are typically at their highest (OR = 1.14 for each night per week; 95% CI = 1.01 to 1.28). Risk did not increase with interrupted sleep accompanied by turning on a light. There was an indication of increased risk among subjects with the brightest bedrooms. Graveyard shiftwork was associated with increased breast cancer risk (OR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.0 to 2.5), with a trend of increased risk with increasing years and with more hours per week of graveyard shiftwork (P = .02, Wald chi-squared test). Conclusion: The results of this study provide evidence that indicators of exposure to light at night may be associated with the risk of developing breast cancer.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0027-8874 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference (up)
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 164
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Author Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Iwamoto, J.; Ikada, Y.; Kurumatani, N.
Title Exposure to light at night and risk of depression in the elderly Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Journal of Affective Disorders Abbreviated Journal J Affect Disord
Volume 151 Issue 1 Pages 331-336
Keywords Aged; Circadian Rhythm; Cross-Sectional Studies; Depression/*etiology; Female; Humans; Light/*adverse effects; Male; Melatonin/urine; Psychiatric Status Rating Scales; Risk Factors; Circadian rhythm; Daytime light; Depression; Elderly; Light at night; Melatonin; Mental Health
Abstract BACKGROUND: Recent advances in understanding the fundamental links between chronobiology and depressive disorders have enabled exploring novel risk factors for depression in the field of biological rhythms. Increased exposure to light at night (LAN) is common in modern life, and LAN exposure is associated with circadian misalignment. However, whether LAN exposure in home settings is associated with depression remains unclear. METHODS: We measured the intensities of nighttime bedroom light and ambulatory daytime light along with overnight urinary melatonin excretion (UME) in 516 elderly individuals (mean age, 72.8). Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Geriatric Depression Scale. RESULTS: The median nighttime light intensity was 0.8lx (interquartile range, 0.2-3.3). The depressed group (n=101) revealed significantly higher prevalence of LAN exposure (average intensity, >/= 5 lx) compared with that of the nondepressed group (n=415) using a multivariate logistic regression model adjusted for daytime light exposure, insomnia, hypertension, sleep duration, and physical activity [adjusted odds ratio (OR): 1.89; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.10-3.25; P=0.02]. Consistently, another parameter of LAN exposure (duration of intensity >/= 10 lx, >/= 30 min) was significantly more prevalent in the depressed than in the nondepressed group (adjusted OR: 1.71; 95% CI, 1.01-2.89; P=0.046). In contrast, UME was not significantly associated with depressive symptoms. LIMITATION: Cross-sectional analysis. CONCLUSION: These results suggested that LAN exposure in home settings is significantly associated with depressive symptoms in the general elderly population. The risk of depression may be reduced by keeping nighttime bedroom dark.
Address Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Nara, Japan. obayashi@naramed-u.ac.jp
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0165-0327 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference (up)
Notes PMID:23856285 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 165
Permanent link to this record