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Author Zhang, W.; Cui, Y.; Wang, J.; Wang, C.; Streets, D.G.
Title How does urbanization affect CO2 emissions of central heating systems in China? An assessment of natural gas transition policy based on nighttime light data Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Cleaner Production Abbreviated Journal Journal of Cleaner Production
Volume 276 Issue Pages (down) 123188
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Understanding the different impacts of urbanization on sectorial carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions at different spatial scales is of great importance for the evaluation of energy transition policies and reduction of environmental inequality. However, how urbanization affects the CO2 emissions of central heating systems at high spatial resolution in China has not been fully studied before. Based on satellite-observed NPP-VIIRS nighttime light (NTL) data, we develop a 5 km × 5 km annual CO2 emission inventory for coal boilers, thermal power plants (TPPs), and natural gas boilers in China’s central heating systems for the period 2012–2017 by using the geographical and temporally weighted regression (GTWR) model. It is observed that nonurban areas generated 2–4 times the CO2 emissions of coal boilers in urban areas. The largest increments of CO2 emissions of gas boilers are observed in urban areas of the eastern (6.80 times) and central regions (2.86 times) in 2013–2014, due to the clean heating policy in the “2 + 26” cities in China. The effects of urbanization on CO2 emissions from natural gas boilers are approximately 2–3 times those of coal boilers, and the differences are largest in western cities with only minor differences in northeastern cities. Our results will aid in designing low-carbon development goals and provide micro-level information on central heating facilities in urbanized and less developed regions.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0959-6526 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3072
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Author Feng, D.; Yang, C.; Fu, M.; Wang, J.; Zhang, M.; Sun, Y.; Bao, W.
Title Do anthropogenic factors affect the improvement of vegetation cover in resource-based region? Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Cleaner Production Abbreviated Journal Journal of Cleaner Production
Volume in press Issue Pages (down) 122705
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Vegetation plays a vital role in ecological systems and, therefore, changes in vegetation reflect the state of the ecological environment. Anthropogenic factors significantly impact vegetation cover. This study investigated variations in vegetation cover and the contribution of anthropogenic factors to these variations using the resourced-based region Shanxi Province as a case study. Theil-Sen median slope analysis and Mann-Kendall tests were used to analyze the vegetation cover change. A series of quantitative and qualitative techniques including spatial econometric modeling and residual analysis modeling were used to assess the effects of anthropogenic factors including ecological policies, urbanization, and coal mining. The results showed that overall, vegetation cover increased in the study area, but parts of the region experienced degradation. Ecological policies have been implemented in Shanxi Province to benefit vegetation cover and have resulted in large-scale human-induced greening. Urbanization had a more significant influence on vegetation cover than did natural factors. The extent of mining areas was not a decisive factor compared to natural factors; however, coal mining did create government revenue and drive economic development. In this manner, government policies could guide anthropogenic factors to create “win-win” scenarios for the environment and economic development. The results of this study promote a deeper understanding of the impact of anthropogenic factors on the ecological environment in resource-based regions.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0959-6526 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3028
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Author Chen, H.; Zhang, X.; Wu, R.; Cai, T.
Title Revisiting the environmental Kuznets curve for city-level CO2 emissions: based on corrected NPP-VIIRS nighttime light data in China Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Cleaner Production Abbreviated Journal Journal of Cleaner Production
Volume Issue Pages (down) 121575
Keywords Remore Sensing; China; carbon emissions; CO2 emissions; night lights; NPP-VIIRS; VIIRS-DNB; VIIRS-DNB; Kuznets curve
Abstract With the increasing trend of global warming, the Chinese government faces tremendous pressure to reduce CO2 emissions. The purpose of this study is to accurately measure CO2 emissions at the city scale in China and examine the environmental Kuznets curve, thereby providing a reference for decision-making. Corrected NPP-VIIRS nighttime light data were used to accurately estimate carbon dioxide emissions at the provincial and city scales in China. Then, based on the STRIPAT model, 291 cities in China were used to verify the environmental Kuznets curve. Our results show that on the provincial scale, the R2 between the estimated value and the statistical value of carbon dioxide reaches 0.85. Western cities in China emit more CO2, as do economically developed cities and industry- and mining-dominated cities. There are two CO2 emission hot spots in the north and one cold spot in the south. It was found that the environmental Kuznets curve on the city scale exists. This study has practical value in utilizing NPP-VIIRS data for the estimation of city CO2 emissions. The results also have academic value for determining factors that contribute to carbon dioxide emissions and can provide a reference for relevant decision makers. This study could be considered the first to simulate CO2 emissions at the provincial and city levels in China based on a NPP-VIIRS nighttime light model to explore the associated geographical distribution characteristics and potential influencing factors.
Address State Key Laboratory of Desert and Oasis Ecology, Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi, 830011, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0959-6526 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2917
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Author Chang, S.; Wang, J.; Zhang, F.; Niu, L.; Wang, Y.
Title A study of the impacts of urban expansion on vegetation primary productivity levels in the Jing-Jin-Ji region, based on nighttime light data Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Cleaner Production Abbreviated Journal Journal of Cleaner Production
Volume 263 Issue Pages (down) 121490
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Rapid urbanization has generated enormous pressure on natural resources. This study illustrates urban expansion in the Jing-Jin-Ji region and its influence on vegetation primary productivity. Tempo-spatial correlations between a vegetation index and nighttime light intensity are discussed to assess the urbanization effect quantitatively. The results show that: (1) From 1998 to 2018, urban areas gradually expanded outward from their original conglomerations. (2) In the past 20 years, Beijing and Tianjin have developed in different ways. The surrounding satellite cities have mostly developed concentrically, although some cities in Hebei province have developed more linearly. (3) The average primary productivity of the study area in 1998, 2003, 2008, 2013, and 2018 was generally lower than that of non-urban regions of the same year. (4) During the period from 1998 to 2018, the primary productivity of vegetation in the urban built-up areas increased, and the condition of the plant improved.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 0959-6526 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2925
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Author Szaz, D.; Horvath, G.; Barta, A.; Robertson, B.A.; Farkas, A.; Egri, A.; Tarjanyi, N.; Racz, G.; Kriska, G.
Title Lamp-Lit Bridges as Dual Light-Traps for the Night-Swarming Mayfly, Ephoron virgo: Interaction of Polarized and Unpolarized Light Pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 10 Issue 3 Pages (down) e0121194
Keywords Animals
Abstract Ecological photopollution created by artificial night lighting can alter animal behavior and lead to population declines and biodiversity loss. Polarized light pollution is a second type of photopollution that triggers water-seeking insects to ovisposit on smooth and dark man-made objects, because they simulate the polarization signatures of natural water bodies. We document a case study of the interaction of these two forms of photopollution by conducting observations and experiments near a lamp-lit bridge over the river Danube that attracts mass swarms of the mayfly Ephoron virgo away from the river to oviposit on the asphalt road of the bridge. Millions of mayflies swarmed near bridge-lights for two weeks. We found these swarms to be composed of 99% adult females performing their upstream compensatory flight and were attracted upward toward unpolarized bridge-lamp light, and away from the horizontally polarized light trail of the river. Imaging polarimetry confirmed that the asphalt surface of the bridge was strongly and horizontally polarized, providing a supernormal ovipositional cue to Ephoron virgo, while other parts of the bridge were poor polarizers of lamplight. Collectively, we confirm that Ephoron virgo is independently attracted to both unpolarized and polarized light sources, that both types of photopollution are being produced at the bridge, and that spatial patterns of swarming and oviposition are consistent with evolved behaviors being triggered maladaptively by these two types of light pollution. We suggest solutions to bridge and lighting design that should prevent or mitigate the impacts of such scenarios in the future. The detrimental impacts of such scenarios may extend beyond Ephoron virgo.
Address Danube Research Institute, Centre for Ecological Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary; Group for Methodology in Biology Teaching, Biological Institute, Eotvos University, Budapest, Hungary
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:25815748 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1145
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