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Author Flores, D.E.F.L.; Jannetti, M.G.; Valentinuzzi, V.S.; Oda, G.A.
Title Entrainment of circadian rhythms to irregular light/dark cycles: a subterranean perspective Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 6 Issue Pages (down) 34264
Keywords Animals
Abstract Synchronization of biological rhythms to the 24-hour day/night has long been studied with model organisms, under artificial light/dark cycles in the laboratory. The commonly used rectangular light/dark cycles, comprising hours of continuous light and darkness, may not be representative of the natural light exposure for most species, including humans. Subterranean rodents live in dark underground tunnels and offer a unique opportunity to investigate extreme mechanisms of photic entrainment in the wild. Here, we show automated field recordings of the daily light exposure patterns in a South American subterranean rodent, the tuco-tuco (Ctenomys aff. knighti ). In the laboratory, we exposed tuco-tucos to a simplified version of this natural light exposure pattern, to determine the minimum light timing information that is necessary for synchronization. As predicted from our previous studies using mathematical modeling, the activity rhythm of tuco-tucos synchronized to this mostly simplified light/dark regimen consisting of a single light pulse per day, occurring at randomly scattered times within a day length interval. Our integrated semi-natural, lab and computer simulation findings indicate that photic entrainment of circadian oscillators is robust, even in face of artificially reduced exposure and increased phase instability of the synchronizing stimuli.
Address Institute of Biosciences, Department of Physiology, University of Sao Paulo; Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, 05508-900; Brazil
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27698436 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1539
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Author Longcore, T.; Rich, C.; Mineau, P.; MacDonald, B.; Bert, D.G.; Sullivan, L.M.; Mutrie, E.; Gauthreaux, S.A.J.; Avery, M.L.; Crawford, R.L.; Manville, A.M. 2nd; Travis, E.R.; Drake, D.
Title An estimate of avian mortality at communication towers in the United States and Canada Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 7 Issue 4 Pages (down) e34025
Keywords Ecology; Accidents/*statistics & numerical data; Altitude; Animals; Birds/*injuries; Canada; Computer Communication Networks/*instrumentation; Conservation of Natural Resources/*statistics & numerical data; *Flight, Animal; *Mortality; Regression Analysis; United States
Abstract Avian mortality at communication towers in the continental United States and Canada is an issue of pressing conservation concern. Previous estimates of this mortality have been based on limited data and have not included Canada. We compiled a database of communication towers in the continental United States and Canada and estimated avian mortality by tower with a regression relating avian mortality to tower height. This equation was derived from 38 tower studies for which mortality data were available and corrected for sampling effort, search efficiency, and scavenging where appropriate. Although most studies document mortality at guyed towers with steady-burning lights, we accounted for lower mortality at towers without guy wires or steady-burning lights by adjusting estimates based on published studies. The resulting estimate of mortality at towers is 6.8 million birds per year in the United States and Canada. Bootstrapped subsampling indicated that the regression was robust to the choice of studies included and a comparison of multiple regression models showed that incorporating sampling, scavenging, and search efficiency adjustments improved model fit. Estimating total avian mortality is only a first step in developing an assessment of the biological significance of mortality at communication towers for individual species or groups of species. Nevertheless, our estimate can be used to evaluate this source of mortality, develop subsequent per-species mortality estimates, and motivate policy action.
Address The Urban Wildlands Group, Los Angeles, California, United States of America. longcore@urbanwildlands.org
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:22558082; PMCID:PMC3338802 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 475
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Author Wang, X.; Cheng, H.
Title Study on the Temporal and Spatial Pattern Differences of Chinese Light Curl Based on DMSP/OLS Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science Abbreviated Journal IOP Conf. Ser.: Earth Environ. Sci.
Volume 310 Issue Pages (down) 032072
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Nighttime light data can detect surface gleams that can intuitively reflect human socioeconomic activity.This paper uses the DMSP/OLS nighttime lighting data from 2001 to 2007 to analyze the coupling relationship between regional economic development and nighttime light intensity in China using regression model.The results show that the brightest areas of nighttime light are mainly concentrated in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region, the Yangtze River Delta region, and the Pearl River Delta region. With the change of theyear, the brightness of the three regions is brighter year by year, indicating that the economy is more and more developed.The linear regression model of total brightness and GDP of regional light: Y=792.218+0.024X, linear slope is 0.024, indicating a positive correlation trend.The provinces and cities with the highest total brightness of the provinces and cities are Guangdong Province, Shandong Province, and Jiangsu Province, and the lowest provinces and cities are Qinghai Province and Tibet Autonomous Region.The total brightness of regional lights in China's provinces and cities is well coupled with GDP. The total brightness of regional lights in all provinces and cities is weakened from east to west. The brightness of the 11 provinces in the eastern region is the strongest, including Beijing, Tianjin, Hebei, Liaoning, Shanghai, and Jiangsu, Zhejiang, Fujian, Shandong, Guangdong, Hainan Province.The second most powerful lighting is the eight provinces in the central region including Shanxi, Jilin, Heilongjiang, Anhui, Jiangxi, Henan, Hubei, and Hunan.The weakest lighting is in the western regions of Sichuan, Chongqing, Guizhou, Yunnan, Tibet, Shaanxi, Gansu, Qinghai, Ningxia, Xinjiang, Guangxi, Inner Mongolia and other provinces (cities).In the east of the Hu Huanyong line, the nighttime lighting is higher than the west of the Hu Huanyong line.The eastern part of China's seven geographical divisions (Shanghai, Jiangsu, Zhejiang, Anhui, Jiangxi, Shandong, Fujian, and Taiwan) has the brightest night lights.The northwestern region (Shaanxi, Gansu, Qinghai, Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, and Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region) has a weak night light.The brightness information of nighttime remote sensing data selected in this study can reflect the level of regional economic development.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1755-1315 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2670
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Author Cho, C.-H.; Moon, J.-H.; Yoon, H.-K.; Kang, S.-G.; Geum, D.; Son, G.-H.; Lim, J.-M.; Kim, L.; Lee, E.-I.; Lee, H.-J.
Title Molecular circadian rhythm shift due to bright light exposure before bedtime is related to subthreshold bipolarity Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 6 Issue Pages (down) 31846
Keywords Human Health
Abstract This study examined the link between circadian rhythm changes due to bright light exposure and subthreshold bipolarity. Molecular circadian rhythms, polysomnography, and actigraphy data were studied in 25 young, healthy male subjects, divided into high and low mood disorder questionnaire (MDQ) score groups. During the first 2 days of the study, the subjects were exposed to daily-living light (150 lux) for 4 hours before bedtime. Saliva and buccal cells were collected 5 times a day for 2 consecutive days. During the subsequent 5 days, the subjects were exposed to bright light (1,000 lux), and saliva and buccal cell samples were collected in the same way. Molecular circadian rhythms were analyzed using sine regression. Circadian rhythms of cortisol (F = 16.956, p < 0.001) and relative PER1/ARNTL gene expression (F = 122.1, p < 0.001) showed a delayed acrophase in both groups after bright light exposure. The high MDQ score group showed a significant delay in acrophase compared to the low MDQ score group only in salivary cortisol (F = 8.528, p = 0.008). The high MDQ score group showed hypersensitivity in cortisol rhythm shift after bright light exposure, suggesting characteristic molecular circadian rhythm changes in the high MDQ score group may be related to biological processes downstream from core circadian clock gene expression.
Address Department of Biomedical Science, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27545669 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1513
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Author Spitschan, M.; Aguirre, G.K.; Brainard, D.H.; Sweeney, A.M.
Title Variation of outdoor illumination as a function of solar elevation and light pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 6 Issue Pages (down) 26756
Keywords Skyglow; Measurements; light pollution; daylight; twilight; sky brightness; spectral irradiance; CIE
Abstract The illumination of the environment undergoes both intensity and spectral changes during the 24 h cycle of a day. Daylight spectral power distributions are well described by low-dimensional models such as the CIE (Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage) daylight model, but the performance of this model in non-daylight regimes is not characterised. We measured downwelling spectral irradiance across multiple days in two locations in North America: One rural location (Cherry Springs State Park, PA) with minimal anthropogenic light sources, and one city location (Philadelphia, PA). We characterise the spectral, intensity and colour changes and extend the existing CIE model for daylight to capture twilight components and the spectrum of the night sky.
Address Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Nature Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27272736 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1464
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