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Author Grauer, A.D.; Grauer, P.A.; Davies, N.; Davies, G.
Title Impact of Space Weather on the Natural Night Sky Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific Abbreviated Journal PASP
Volume 131 Issue 1005 Pages (down) 114508
Keywords Darkness; night sky brightness; United States; New Zealand; Sun; space weather; solar wind
Abstract In 2018, Solar Cycle 24 entered a deep solar minimum. During this period, we collected night sky brightness data at Cosmic Campground International Dark Sky Sanctuary (CCIDSS) in the USA (2018 September 4–2019 January 4) and at Aotea/Great Barrier Island International Dark Sky Sanctuary (AGBIIDSS) in New Zealand (2018 March 26–August 31. These sites have artificial-light-pollution-free natural night skies. The equipment employed are identical Unihedron SQM-LU-DL meters, used as single-channel differential photometers, to scan the sky as Earth rotates on its axis. We have developed new analysis techniques which select those data points which are uninfluenced by Sun, Moon, or clouds to follow brightness changes at selected points on the celestial sphere and to measure the brightness of the airglow above its quiescent level. The 2018 natural night sky was measured to change in brightness by approximately 0.9 mag arcsec−2 at both locations. Preliminary results indicate the modulations of the light curves (brightness versus R.A.) we observed are related in complex ways to elements of space weather conditions in the near-Earth environment. In particular, episodes of increased night sky brightness are observed to be contemporaneous with geomagnetic activity, increases in mean solar wind speed, and some solar proton/electron fluence events. Charged particles in the solar wind take days to reach near-Earth environment after a coronal hole is observed to be facing in our direction. Use of this information could make it possible to predict increases in Earth’s natural night sky brightness several days in advance. What we have learned during this solar minimum leads us to search for other solar driven changes in night sky brightness as the Sun begins to move into solar maximum conditions.
Address Catalina Sky Survey, Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, USA; algrauer(at)me.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Astronomical Society of the Pacific Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0004-6280 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2696
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Author Renthlei, Z.; Trivedi, A.K.
Title Effect of urban environment on pineal machinery and clock genes expression of tree sparrow (Passer montanus) Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution
Volume 255 Issue Pages (down) 113278
Keywords Animals
Abstract Increasing urbanisation is altering the physiology of wild animals and the mechanisms involved are largely unknown. We hypothesised that altering the physiology of urban organisms is due to the effect of extra light at night on the circadian clock by modulating the expression of pineal machinery and clock genes. Two experiments were performed. In Experiment 1, immediately after being procured from their respective sites (urban and rural sites), birds were released individually in LLdim light conditions. Circadian rhythm period, activity duration, and total activity count were calculated and did not differ between urban and rural birds. In Experiment 2, birds (from urban and rural habitats) were sampled at six time points at regular 4-h intervals, beginning 1 h after sunrise. We measured daily variations in plasma melatonin levels. We also analysed the expression levels of Aanat, Mel1A and Mel1B as an indicator of melatonin biosynthesis and action machinery. Clock and clock-controlled genes (Bmal1, Clock, Per2, Per3, Cry1 and Npas2) were studied in the hypothalamus, the pineal gland, and retina to investigate the effects of urban habitats on the circadian clock. Our results show that there is a lower expression of Aanat in the pineal gland and relatively low plasma melatonin levels in urban birds. Further, clock genes are also differentially expressed in all three central tissues of urban birds. We propose that alterations in the melatonin biosynthesis machinery and the expression of clock genes could result in miscalculations in the internal timing of the organism, with environmental timings leading to altered physiology in urban wild animals.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2682
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Author Lin, C.-F.; Tsai, T.-Y.; Chen, K.-Y.; Shen, P.-C.
Title Efficient warm-white lighting using rare-earth-element-free fluorescent materials for saving energy, environment protection and human health Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication RSC Adv. Abbreviated Journal RSC Adv.
Volume 6 Issue 113 Pages (down) 111959-111965
Keywords Lighting
Abstract Solid-state white light emission is important for energy saving, but currently it is mainly based on environmentally unfriendly rare-earth doped phosphors or cadmium-containing quantum dots. Here, we explore an environmentally friendly approach for efficient white light emission based on ZnSe:Mn nanoparticles without rare-earth or cadmium elements. The emission is composed of a broad green-orange spectral band (525–650 nm) with the peak located at 578 nm and the color temperature is low, so it is particularly good for lighting at night to reduce risks to human health. Furthermore, the optimal absorption peak could be designed at 453 nm, which well matches the commercial blue-LED emission wavelength (445–470 nm). A quantum yield up to 84.5% could also be achieved. This rare-earth-element-free material opens up a new avenue for energy-saving, healthy, and environmentally benign lighting.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2046-2069 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1566
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Author Li, X.; Ma, R.; Zhang, Q.; Li, D.; Liu, S.; He, T.; Zhao, L.
Title Anisotropic characteristic of artificial light at night – Systematic investigation with VIIRS DNB multi-temporal observations Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment
Volume 233 Issue Pages (down) 111357
Keywords Remote Sensing; Instrumentation
Abstract The released VIIRS DNB nightly images, also known as VIIRS DNB daily nighttime images, provide rich information for time series analysis of global socioeconomic dynamics. Anisotropic characteristic is a possible factor that influences the VIIRS DNB radiance at night and its time series analysis. This study aims to investigate the relationship between viewing angles and VIIRS DNB radiance of Suomi NPP satellite in urban areas. First, twenty-nine points were selected globally to explore the angle variation of Suomi NPP satellite views at night. We found that the variation of the satellite viewing zenith angle (VZA) is consistent (e.g. between 0° and 70°) since the range of VZA is fixed depending on the sensor design, and the range of viewing azimuth angle (VAA) increases with the increase of latitude. Second, thirty points in cities of Beijing, Houston, Los Angeles, Moscow, Quito and Sydney, were used to investigate the angle-radiance relationship. We proposed a zenith-radiance quadratic (ZRQ) model and a zenith-azimuth-radiance binary quadratic (ZARBQ) model to quantify the relationship between satellite viewing angles and artificial light radiance, which has been corrected by removing the moonlight and atmospheric impact from VIIRS DNB radiance products. For all the thirty points, the ZRQ and ZARBQ analysis have averaged R2 of 0.50 and 0.53, respectively, which indicates that the viewing angles are important factors influencing the variation of the artificial light radiance, but extending zenith to zenith-azimuth does not much better explain the variation of the observed artificial light. Importantly, based on the data analysis, we can make the hypothesis that building height may affect the relationship between VZA and artificial light, and cold and hot spot effects are clearly found in tall building areas. These findings are potentially useful to reconstruct more stable time series VIIRS DNB images for socioeconomic applications by removing the angular effects.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2621
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Author Rodríguez, A.; Burgan, G.; Dann, P.; Jessop, R.; Negro, J.J.; Chiaradia, A.
Title Fatal Attraction of Short-Tailed Shearwaters to Artificial Lights Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication PLOS ONE Abbreviated Journal PLOS ONE
Volume 9 Issue Pages (down) e110114
Keywords
Abstract Light pollution is increasing around the world and altering natural nightscapes with potential ecological and evolutionary consequences. A severe ecological perturbation caused by artificial lights is mass mortalities of organisms, including seabird fledglings that are attracted to lights at night on their first flights to the sea. Here, we report on the number of fledging short-tailed shearwaters Ardenna tenuirostris found grounded in evening and morning rescue patrols conducted at Phillip Island, Australia, during a 15-year period (1999–2013). We assessed factors affecting numbers of grounded birds and mortality including date, moon phase, wind direction and speed, number of visitors and holiday periods. We also tested experimentally if birds were attracted to lights by turning the lights off on a section of the road. Of 8871 fledglings found, 39% were dead or dying. This mortality rate was 4–8 times higher than reported elsewhere for other shearwater species, probably because searching for fledglings was part of our systematic rescue effort rather than the opportunistic rescue used elsewhere. Thus, it suggests that light-induced mortality of seabirds is usually underestimated. We rescued more birds (dead and alive) in peak fledging, moonless and windy nights. Mortality increased through the fledging period, in the mornings and with increased traffic on holiday periods. Turning the road lights off decreased the number of grounded birds (dead and alive). While moon, wind and time are uncontrolled natural constraints, we demonstrated that reduction of light pollution and better traffic management can mitigate artificial light-induced mortality.
Address Animals; light pollution; ecology; shearwater; short-tailed shearwaters; Ardenna tenuirostris; Phillip Island; Australia; mortality; birds
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher PLOS Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 678
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