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Author Pagden, M.; Ngahane, K.; Amin, M.S.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Changing the colour of night on urban streets – LED vs. part-night lighting system Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Socio-Economic Planning Sciences Abbreviated Journal Socio-Economic Planning Sciences  
  Volume in press Issue Pages (down) 100692  
  Keywords Energy; Planning; Economics; United Kingdom; LED; Lighting  
  Abstract Many cities in the United Kingdom are upgrading the streetlights to white light-emitting diode (LED) lamps for reducing the electricity costs and attaining the sustainable energy solutions. Installation of LED lamps on urban street requires higher installation costs and a long-term period to payback benefits of replacing outdated streetlights in terms of energy savings and costs. To achieve the short-term energy efficiency of urban street lighting, city councils sometimes adopt the part-night lighting system particularly in the residential areas. The Coventry City Council recently replaced 29,701 existing sodium lights with LED lamps. This paper performs the economic analyses to understand the feasibility of two street lighting systems: LED lamps and ‘part-night’ lightings on the Coventry streets during the twenty-year period assuming the return period of investment is twenty years. The projection of energy consumption and costs for LED lamps and part-night lighting systems shows that electricity can be saved by 44% and 21% comparing to current electricity usages, respectively. Considering the budgetary constraints of Coventry City Council, this paper concludes that the part-night lighting system may be beneficial in short-term period, but it is economically feasible to replace the existing lower efficiency lights with LED lamps.  
  Address Faculty of Engineering, Environment & Computing, Coventry University, Priory St, Coventry, West Midlands, CV1 5FB, United Kingdom; pagdenm(at)uni.coventry.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher English Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0038-0121 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2234  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mpakairi, K.S.; Muvengwi, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Night-time lights and their influence on summer night land surface temperature in two urban cities of Zimbabwe: A geospatial perspective Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Urban Climate Abbreviated Journal Urban Climate  
  Volume 29 Issue Pages (down) 100468  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Owing to the developments that exist in urban landscapes, urban areas experience climates that are different from their surroundings even when in the same climatic region. This is a prominent phenomenon in most urban areas and is commonly known as Surface Urban Heat Island (SUHI). An understanding of some of the drivers of SUHI is imperative for cities worldwide if they endeavor to suppress the socio-economic mishaps related to extremely high UHI. In this study, we sought to explain the drivers of SUHI in two developing cities in Zimbabwe using remote sensing data. We do this through the use of a classification and regression model. The model used climate, land descriptors and anthropogenic activity data as predictor variables against summer night land surface temperature. Using the coefficient of determination (R2) and the root mean square error (RMSE) for evaluation, modelled SUHI was strongly related to actual SUHI. We also found out that night-time lights, a proxy of anthropogenic activity, contributed more to summer night surface urban heat island as compared to other variables used in the study. This study adds more knowledge on the likely drivers of UHI for southern African cities. By identifying SUHI drivers in urban cities, it is plausible to formulate policies or initiatives that regulate extreme summer night SUHI.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2212-0955 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2497  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ranzoni, J.; Giuliani, G.; Huber, L.; Ray, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Modelling the nocturnal ecological continuum of the State of Geneva, Switzerland, based on high-resolution nighttime imagery Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Remote Sensing Applications: Society and Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing Applications: Society and Environment  
  Volume 16 Issue Pages (down) 100268  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Ecology; Switzerland; Europe; orthophotography; viewshed analysis  
  Abstract The increase of artificial light in recent decades has led to a general awareness of the harmful consequences of light pollution on biodiversity. The artificial light is however rarely taken into account in the principles of developing ecological networks. There is currently no standardized method for integrating this darkness factor into ecological network modeling. We propose a methodology for the identification of the nocturnal continuum through an approach based on the automated extraction of light sources from nocturnal orthophotography and the modeling of their visibility within a territory. The model is applied to the transboundary region of the Geneva basin in Switzerland and allows for the integration of the darkness factor into the existing ecological networks. Although the analysis does not consider metric lighting data, a viewshed analysis allows for a first large-scale mapping of the nighttime continuum and highlights the areas benefiting from very low light pollution.  
  Address University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Route de Presinge 150, 1254, Jussy, Switzerland; jessica.ranzoni(at)hesge.ch  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2352-9385 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2687  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nelson, J.A.; Bugbee, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Economic analysis of greenhouse lighting: light emitting diodes vs. high intensity discharge fixtures Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 9 Issue 6 Pages (down) e99010  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Lighting technologies for plant growth are improving rapidly, providing numerous options for supplemental lighting in greenhouses. Here we report the photosynthetic (400-700 nm) photon efficiency and photon distribution pattern of two double-ended HPS fixtures, five mogul-base HPS fixtures, ten LED fixtures, three ceramic metal halide fixtures, and two fluorescent fixtures. The two most efficient LED and the two most efficient double-ended HPS fixtures had nearly identical efficiencies at 1.66 to 1.70 micromoles per joule. These four fixtures represent a dramatic improvement over the 1.02 micromoles per joule efficiency of the mogul-base HPS fixtures that are in common use. The best ceramic metal halide and fluorescent fixtures had efficiencies of 1.46 and 0.95 micromoles per joule, respectively. We also calculated the initial capital cost of fixtures per photon delivered and determined that LED fixtures cost five to ten times more than HPS fixtures. The five-year electric plus fixture cost per mole of photons is thus 2.3 times higher for LED fixtures, due to high capital costs. Compared to electric costs, our analysis indicates that the long-term maintenance costs are small for both technologies. If widely spaced benches are a necessary part of a production system, the unique ability of LED fixtures to efficiently focus photons on specific areas can be used to improve the photon capture by plant canopies. Our analysis demonstrates, however, that the cost per photon delivered is higher in these systems, regardless of fixture category. The lowest lighting system costs are realized when an efficient fixture is coupled with effective canopy photon capture.  
  Address Crop Physiology Laboratory, Department of Plant Soils and Climate, Utah State University, Logan, Utah, United States of America  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24905835; PMCID:PMC4048233 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2233  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Inger, R.; Bennie, J.; Davies, T.W.; Gaston, K.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Potential biological and ecological effects of flickering artificial light Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 9 Issue 5 Pages (down) e98631  
  Keywords flickering; artificial light; biology  
  Abstract Organisms have evolved under stable natural lighting regimes, employing cues from these to govern key ecological processes. However, the extent and density of artificial lighting within the environment has increased recently, causing widespread alteration of these regimes. Indeed, night-time electric lighting is known significantly to disrupt phenology, behaviour, and reproductive success, and thence community composition and ecosystem functioning. Until now, most attention has focussed on effects of the occurrence, timing, and spectral composition of artificial lighting. Little considered is that many types of lamp do not produce a constant stream of light but a series of pulses. This flickering light has been shown to have detrimental effects in humans and other species. Whether a species is likely to be affected will largely be determined by its visual temporal resolution, measured as the critical fusion frequency. That is the frequency at which a series of light pulses are perceived as a constant stream. Here we use the largest collation to date of critical fusion frequencies, across a broad range of taxa, to demonstrate that a significant proportion of species can detect such flicker in widely used lamps. Flickering artificial light thus has marked potential to produce ecological effects that have not previously been considered.  
  Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall, United Kingdom  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24874801; PMCID:PMC4038456 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 237  
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