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Author Figueiro, M.G.; Rea, M.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effects of red and blue lights on circadian variations in cortisol, alpha amylase, and melatonin Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication International Journal of Endocrinology Abbreviated Journal Int J Endocrinol  
  Volume 2010 Issue Pages (down) 829351  
  Keywords blue light; red light; circadian rhythm; cortisol; alpha amylase; melatonin; photobiology; suprachiasmatic nuclei; endocrinology  
  Abstract The primary purpose of the present study was to expand our understanding of the impact of light exposures on the endocrine and autonomic systems as measured by acute cortisol, alpha amylase, and melatonin responses. We utilized exposures from narrowband long-wavelength (red) and from narrow-band short-wavelength (blue) lights to more precisely understand the role of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) in these responses. In a within-subjects experimental design, twelve subjects periodically received one-hour corneal exposures of 40 lux from the blue or from the red lights while continuously awake for 27 hours. Results showed-that, as expected, only the blue light reduced nocturnal melatonin. In contrast, both blue and red lights affected cortisol levels and, although less clear, alpha amylase levels as well. The present data bring into question whether the nonvisual pathway mediating nocturnal melatonin suppression is the same as that mediating other responses to light exhibited by the endocrine and the autonomic nervous systems.  
  Address Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 21 Union Street, 3rd Floor, Troy, New York, NY 12180, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1687-8337 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:20652045; PMCID:PMC2905913 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 291  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gao, X.; Pang, G.; Luo, X.; You, W.; Ke, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of light cycle on motion behaviour and melatonin secretion in Haliotis discus hannai Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Aquaculture Abbreviated Journal Aquaculture  
  Volume in press Issue Pages (down) 735981  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The abalone Haliotis discus hannai is a typical nocturnal marine invertebrate. In this study, a quantitative analysis was performed on the motion behaviour characteristics of abalones exposed to different light cycles (0 L:24D, 12 L:12D, 24 L:0D) using infrared camera and behavioural analysis software. A preliminary analysis of the intrinsic correlations between melatonin secretion and abalone behaviour rhythms was also conducted. The results showed that the cumulative moving distance and duration of movement for abalone in the 0 L:24D group were significantly higher than those in the 12 L:12D and 24 L:0D groups (P < 0.05). The mean and maximum moving velocities of abalones in the 12 L:12D group were significantly higher than those in the 0 L:24D group (P < 0.05). The maximum cumulative moving distance and duration of movement for abalone in the 12 L:12D and 24 L:0D groups occurred between 00:00–03:00. In the 0 L:24D group, peak cumulative moving distance and duration movement were recorded between 00:00–03:00 and 15:00–18:00. According to the results of cosine analysis, melatonin content and expression levels of aralkylamine N-acetyl transferase (AANAT) and N-acetylserotonin O-methyltransferase (ASMT) in the 12 L:12D and 24 L:0D groups showed significant circadian cosine rhythms (P < 0.05) and tended to be higher during the day and lower at night. Compared with the variation trend of melatonin, the expression levels of melatonin receptor (MTR) in each group showed significant circadian cosine rhythms (P < 0.05). Especially in the 0 L:24D group, the expression levels of MTR also tended to be higher during the day and lower at night, indicating that MTR may mediate other factors which participate in the regulation of abalone circadian rhythms. The results of this study provide a quantitative description of the motion behaviour characteristics of abalone exposed to different light cycles. The intrinsic correlation between melatonin secretion and abalone motion behaviour rhythms was also examined in this study, which in turn provides a reference for light regulation and feeding strategies in aquaculture production.  
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  ISSN 0044-8486 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3167  
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Author Falcon, J.; Torriglia, A.; Attia, D.; Vienot, F.; Gronfier, C.; Behar-Cohen, F.; Martinsons, C.; Hicks, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Exposure to Artificial Light at Night and the Consequences for Flora, Fauna, and Ecosystems Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Frontiers in Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Front Neurosci  
  Volume 14 Issue Pages (down) 602796  
  Keywords Review; Animals; Plants; Ecology; anthropogenic impact; artificial-light-at-night; biological clocks; ecosystems; light-emitting-diodes; photoreception  
  Abstract The present review draws together wide-ranging studies performed over the last decades that catalogue the effects of artificial-light-at-night (ALAN) upon living species and their environment. We provide an overview of the tremendous variety of light-detection strategies which have evolved in living organisms – unicellular, plants and animals, covering chloroplasts (plants), and the plethora of ocular and extra-ocular organs (animals). We describe the visual pigments which permit photo-detection, paying attention to their spectral characteristics, which extend from the ultraviolet into infrared. We discuss how organisms use light information in a way crucial for their development, growth and survival: phototropism, phototaxis, photoperiodism, and synchronization of circadian clocks. These aspects are treated in depth, as their perturbation underlies much of the disruptive effects of ALAN. The review goes into detail on circadian networks in living organisms, since these fundamental features are of critical importance in regulating the interface between environment and body. Especially, hormonal synthesis and secretion are often under circadian and circannual control, hence perturbation of the clock will lead to hormonal imbalance. The review addresses how the ubiquitous introduction of light-emitting diode technology may exacerbate, or in some cases reduce, the generalized ever-increasing light pollution. Numerous examples are given of how widespread exposure to ALAN is perturbing many aspects of plant and animal behaviour and survival: foraging, orientation, migration, seasonal reproduction, colonization and more. We examine the potential problems at the level of individual species and populations and extend the debate to the consequences for ecosystems. We stress, through a few examples, the synergistic harmful effects resulting from the impacts of ALAN combined with other anthropogenic pressures, which often impact the neuroendocrine loops in vertebrates. The article concludes by debating how these anthropogenic changes could be mitigated by more reasonable use of available technology – for example by restricting illumination to more essential areas and hours, directing lighting to avoid wasteful radiation and selecting spectral emissions, to reduce impact on circadian clocks. We end by discussing how society should take into account the potentially major consequences that ALAN has on the natural world and the repercussions for ongoing human health and welfare.  
  Address Inserm, CNRS, Institut des Neurosciences Cellulaires et Integratives, Universite de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1662-453X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:33304237; PMCID:PMC7701298 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3245  
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Author Tsao, J.Y.; Saunders, H.D.; Creighton, J.R.; Coltrin, M.E.; Simmons, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Solid-state lighting: an energy-economics perspective Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics Abbreviated Journal J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys.  
  Volume 43 Issue 35 Pages (down) 354001  
  Keywords artificial light; solid state; light emitting diode; LED; economics  
  Abstract Artificial light has long been a significant factor contributing to the quality and productivity of human life. As a consequence, we are willing to use huge amounts of energy to produce it. Solid-state lighting (SSL) is an emerging technology that promises performance features and efficiencies well beyond those of traditional artificial lighting, accompanied by potentially massive shifts in (a) the consumption of light, (b) the human productivity and energy use associated with that consumption and (c) the semiconductor chip area inventory and turnover required to support that consumption. In this paper, we provide estimates of the baseline magnitudes of these shifts using simple extrapolations of past behaviour into the future. For past behaviour, we use recent studies of historical and contemporary consumption patterns analysed within a simple energy-economics framework (a Cobb–Douglas production function and profit maximization). For extrapolations into the future, we use recent reviews of believed-achievable long-term performance targets for SSL. We also discuss ways in which the actual magnitudes could differ from the baseline magnitudes of these shifts. These include: changes in human societal demand for light; possible demand for features beyond lumens; and guidelines and regulations aimed at economizing on consumption of light and associated energy.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-3727 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 127  
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Author Parkinson, E.; Lawson, J.; Tiegs, S.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light at night at the terrestrial-aquatic interface: Effects on predators and fluxes of insect prey Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 15 Issue 10 Pages (down) e0240138  
  Keywords Ecology  
  Abstract The outcomes of species interactions-such as those between predators and prey-increasingly depend on environmental conditions that are modified by human activities. Light is among the most fundamental environmental parameters, and humans have dramatically altered natural light regimes across much of the globe through the addition of artificial light at night (ALAN). The consequences for species interactions, communities and ecosystems are just beginning to be understood. Here we present findings from a replicated field experiment that simulated over-the-water lighting in the littoral zone of a small lake. We evaluated responses by emergent aquatic insects and terrestrial invertebrate communities, and riparian predators (tetragnathid spiders). On average ALAN plots had 51% more spiders than control plots that were not illuminated. Mean individual spider body mass was greater in ALAN plots relative to controls, an effect that was strongly sex-dependent; mean male body mass was 34% greater in ALAN plots while female body mass was 176% greater. The average number of prey items captured in spider webs was 139% greater on ALAN mesocosms, an effect attributed to emergent aquatic insects. Non-metric multidimensional scaling and a multiple response permutation procedure revealed significantly different invertebrate communities captured in pan traps positioned in ALAN plots and controls. Control plots had taxonomic-diversity values (as H') that were 58% greater than ALAN plots, and communities that were 83% more-even. We attribute these differences to the aquatic family Caenidae which was the dominant family across both light treatments, but was 818% more abundant in ALAN plots. Our findings show that when ALAN is located in close proximity to freshwater it can concentrate fluxes of emergent aquatic insects, and that terrestrial predators in the littoral zone can compound this effect and intercept resource flows, preventing them from entering the terrestrial realm.  
  Address Department of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan, United States of America  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:33031444 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3173  
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