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Author Nicole Wonderlin, L. M. Ross, Peter White url  openurl
  Title Construction and performance of a novel capturemark-release moth trap Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The Great Lakes Entomologist Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 50 Issue in press Pages (up) in press  
  Keywords Animals; Instrumentation  
  Abstract Mark-recapture studies can provide important information about moth movement as well as habitat preference across a landscape, but to date, such studies tend to be species-specific or require labor-intensive methodologies. To address this challenge, we designed a capture-mark-release-trap (CMRT) featuring a cooling unit attached to a black light trap. The CMRT captures and incapacitates moths throughout the night until the morning, when they can be marked on-site and released. Moths captured with the CMRT during summer of 2016 had a recapture rate of 1.6%, similar to those of previous studies. Importantly, because moths are immobilized by the CMRT, they can be handled and marked with ease, reducing the opportunities to damage specimens prior to release. The CMRT can capture a wide array of moth species and may facilitate an increase in the monitoring of moth movement across landscapes.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1756  
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Author Miller, C.R.; Barton, B.T.; Zhu, L.; Radeloff, V.C.; Oliver, K.M.; Harmon, J.P.; Ives, A.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Combined effects of night warming and light pollution on predator-prey interactions Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Proceedings. Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci  
  Volume 284 Issue 1864 Pages (up)  
  Keywords Ecology; Animals  
  Abstract Interactions between multiple anthropogenic environmental changes can drive non-additive effects in ecological systems, and the non-additive effects can in turn be amplified or dampened by spatial covariation among environmental changes. We investigated the combined effects of night-time warming and light pollution on pea aphids and two predatory ladybeetle species. As expected, neither night-time warming nor light pollution changed the suppression of aphids by the ladybeetle species that forages effectively in darkness. However, for the more-visual predator, warming and light had non-additive effects in which together they caused much lower aphid abundances. These results are particularly relevant for agriculture near urban areas that experience both light pollution and warming from urban heat islands. Because warming and light pollution can have non-additive effects, predicting their possible combined consequences over broad spatial scales requires knowing how they co-occur. We found that night-time temperature change since 1949 covaried positively with light pollution, which has the potential to increase their non-additive effects on pea aphid control by 70% in US alfalfa. Our results highlight the importance of non-additive effects of multiple environmental factors on species and food webs, especially when these factors co-occur.  
  Address Department of Integrative Biology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29021171 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1760  
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Author Clanton, N.; Gibbons, R.; Garcia, J.; Barber, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Seattle LED Adaptive Lighting Study Type Report
  Year 2014 Publication Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance Abbreviated Journal NEEA  
  Volume Issue E14-286 Pages (up)  
  Keywords Public Safety; Lighting; Planning; Vision  
  Abstract The Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA) and the City of Seattle partnered to evaluate the future of solid state street lighting in the Pacific Northwest with a two-night demonstration in Seattle's Ballard neighborhood in March 2012. The study evaluates the effectiveness of LED streetlights on nighttime driver object detection visibility as function of light source spectral distribution (color temperature in degrees K) and light distribution. Clanton & Associates and VTTI also evaluated adaptive lighting (tuning of streetlights during periods of reduced vehicular and pedestrian activity) at three levels: one hundred percent of full light output, fifty percent of full light output, and twenty-five percent of full light output. The study, led by Clanton & Associates, Continuum Industries, and the VTTI, built upon previous visual performance studies conducted in Anchorage, Alaska; San Diego, California; and San Jose, California. The use of LED technology for city street lighting is becoming more widespread. While these lights are primarily touted for their energy efficiency, the combination of LEDs with advanced control technology, changes to lighting criteria, and a better understanding of human mesopic (low light level) visibility creates an enormous potential for energy savings and improved motorist and pedestrian visibility and safety. Data from these tests support the following statements: LED luminaires with a correlated color temperature of 4100K provide the highest detection distance, including statistically significantly better detection distance when compared to HPS luminaires of higher wattage. The non-uniformity of the lighting on the roadway surface provides a visibility enhancement and greater contrast for visibility. Contrast of objects, both positive and negative, is a better indicator of visibility than is average luminance level. Dimming the LED luminaires to fifty percent of IES RP-8 levels did not significantly reduce object detection distance in dry pavement conditions. Participants perceived dimming of sidewalks as less acceptable than dimming to the same level on the roadway. Asymmetric lighting did reduce glare and performed similarly to the symmetric lighting at the same color temperature (4100K).  
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  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1763  
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Author Blair, A. url  isbn
openurl 
  Title Sark in the Dark: Wellbeing and Community on the Dark Sky Island of Sark Type Book Whole
  Year 2016 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages (up)  
  Keywords Society; ecopsychology; environmental psychology; psychology  
  Abstract Studies of the beneficial and transformative qualities of encounters with nature typically focus on ‘green’ or grounded nature. In 'Sark in the Dark', Ada Blair shifts this focus upwards to a refreshing encounter with the richness of the dark night sky. In this book, she documents the research she conducted while at the University of Wales Trinity Saint David into the culture and history of the world’s first designated Dark Sky Island. Through a series of interviews with Sark residents, as well as poignant self-reflections, Blair explores the importance of the dark sky on human wellbeing and community.  
  Address caladach(at)gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Sophia Centre Press Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Sophia Centre Master Monographs Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 978-1-907767-42-5 Medium Print  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1780  
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Author Skvareninová, J.; Tuhárska, M.; Skvarenina, J.; Babálová, D.; Slobodníková, L.; Slobodník, B.; Stredová, H.; Mindas, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of light pollution on tree phenology in the urban environment Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Moravian Geographical Reports Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 25 Issue 4 Pages (up)  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Research on urban climates has been an important topic in recent years, given the growing number of city inhabitants and significant influences of climate on health. Nevertheless, far less research has focused on the impacts of light pollution, not only on humans, but also on plants and animals in the landscape. This paper reports a study measuring the intensity of light pollution and its impact on the autumn phenological phases of tree species in the town of Zvolen (Slovakia). The research was carried out at two housing estates and in the central part of the town in the period 2013–2016. The intensity of ambient nocturnal light at 18 measurement points was greater under cloudy weather than in clear weather conditions. Comparison with the ecological standard for Slovakia showed that average night light values in the town centre and in the housing estate with an older type of public lighting, exceeded the threshold value by 5 lux. Two tree species, sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) and staghorn sumac (Rhus typhina L.), demonstrated sensitivity to light pollution. The average onset of the autumn phenophases in the crown parts situated next to the light sources was delayed by 13 to 22 days, and their duration was prolonged by 6 to 9 days. There are three major results: (i) the effects of light pollution on organisms in the urban environment are documented; (ii) the results provide support for a theoretical and practical basis for better urban planning policies to mitigate light pollution effects on organisms; and (iii) some limits of the use of plant phenology as a bioindicator of climate change are presented.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1210-8812 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1799  
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