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Author Kronfeld-Schor, N.; Dominoni, D.; de la Iglesia, H.; Levy, O.; Herzog, E.D.; Dayan, T.; Helfrich-Forster, C.
Title Chronobiology by moonlight Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Proceedings. Biological Sciences / The Royal Society Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci
Volume 280 Issue 1765 Pages 20123088
Keywords Animals; Behavior, Animal/physiology; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Feeding Behavior/*physiology; Invertebrates/*physiology; *Light; *Moon; Predatory Behavior/physiology; Reproduction/physiology; Vertebrates/physiology; communication; foraging; light pollution; lunar cycle; predation; reproduction
Abstract Most studies in chronobiology focus on solar cycles (daily and annual). Moonlight and the lunar cycle received considerably less attention by chronobiologists. An exception are rhythms in intertidal species. Terrestrial ecologists long ago acknowledged the effects of moonlight on predation success, and consequently on predation risk, foraging behaviour and habitat use, while marine biologists have focused more on the behaviour and mainly on reproduction synchronization with relation to the Moon phase. Lately, several studies in different animal taxa addressed the role of moonlight in determining activity and studied the underlying mechanisms. In this paper, we review the ecological and behavioural evidence showing the effect of moonlight on activity, discuss the adaptive value of these changes, and describe possible mechanisms underlying this effect. We will also refer to other sources of night-time light ('light pollution') and highlight open questions that demand further studies.
Address Department of Zoology, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978, Israel. nogaks@tauex.tau.ac.il
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN (up) Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23825199; PMCID:PMC3712431 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 29
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Author Pauers, M.J.; Kuchenbecker, J.A.; Neitz, M.; Neitz, J.
Title Changes in the colour of light cue circadian activity Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal Anim Behav
Volume 83 Issue 5 Pages 1143-1151
Keywords melanopsin; Circadian Rhythm; physiology of vision; biology
Abstract The discovery of melanopsin, the non-visual opsin present in intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs), has created great excitement in the field of circadian biology. Now, researchers have emphasized melanopsin as the main photopigment governing circadian activity in vertebrates. Circadian biologists have tested this idea under standard laboratory, 12h Light: 12h Dark, lighting conditions that lack the dramatic daily colour changes of natural skylight. Here we used a stimulus paradigm in which the colour of the illumination changed throughout the day, thus mimicking natural skylight, but luminance, sensed intrinsically by melanopsin containing ganglion cells, was kept constant. We show in two species of cichlid, Aequidens pulcher and Labeotropheus fuelleborni, that changes in light colour, not intensity, are the primary determinants of natural circadian activity. Moreover, opponent-cone photoreceptor inputs to ipRGCs mediate the sensation of wavelength change, and not the intrinsic photopigment, melanopsin. These results have implications for understanding the evolutionary biology of non-visual photosensory pathways and answer long-standing questions about the nature and distribution of photopigments in organisms, including providing a solution to the mystery of why nocturnal animals routinely have mutations that interrupt the function of their short wavelength sensitive photopigment gene.
Address Department of Ophthalmology, University of Washington Medical School, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, Washington, 98195, USA
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN (up) Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:22639465; PMCID:PMC3358782 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 30
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Author Evans, J.A.; Elliott, J.A.; Gorman, M.R.
Title Circadian effects of light no brighter than moonlight Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms
Volume 22 Issue 4 Pages 356-367
Keywords Animals; Biological Clocks/physiology/*radiation effects; *Circadian Rhythm; Cricetinae; Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation; Lighting/*methods; Male; Mesocricetus; Motor Activity; Oscillometry; Photic Stimulation/methods; *Photoperiod; Physical Conditioning, Animal; Time Factors
Abstract In mammals, light entrains endogenous circadian pacemakers by inducing daily phase shifts via a photoreceptor mechanism recently discovered in retinal ganglion cells. Light that is comparable in intensity to moonlight is generally ineffective at inducing phase shifts or suppressing melatonin secretion, which has prompted the view that circadian photic sensitivity has been titrated so that the central pacemaker is unaffected by natural nighttime illumination. However, the authors have shown in several different entrainment paradigms that completely dark nights are not functionally equivalent to dimly lit nights, even when nighttime illumination is below putative thresholds for the circadian visual system. The present studies extend these findings. Dim illumination is shown here to be neither a strong zeitgeber, consistent with published fluence response curves, nor a potentiator of other zeitgebers. Nevertheless, dim light markedly alters the behavior of the free-running circadian pacemaker. Syrian hamsters were released from entrained conditions into constant darkness or dim narrowband green illumination (~0.01 lx, 1.3 x 10(-9) W/cm(2), peak lambda = 560 nm). Relative to complete darkness, constant dim light lengthened the period by ~0.3 h and altered the waveform of circadian rhythmicity. Among animals transferred from long day lengths (14 L:10 D) into constant conditions, dim illumination increased the duration of the active phase (alpha) by ~3 h relative to complete darkness. Short day entrainment (8 L:16 D) produced initially long alpha that increased further under constant dim light but decreased under complete darkness. In contrast, dim light pulses 2 h or longer produced effects on circadian phase and melatonin secretion that were small in magnitude. Furthermore, the amplitude of phase resetting to bright light and nonphotic stimuli was similar against dimly lit and dark backgrounds, indicating that the former does not directly amplify circadian inputs. Dim illumination markedly alters circadian waveform through effects on alpha, suggesting that dim light influences the coupling between oscillators theorized to program the beginning and end of subjective night. Physiological mechanisms responsible for conveying dim light stimuli to the pacemaker and implications for chronotherapeutics warrant further study.
Address Department of Psychology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, usa. jaevans@ucsd.edu
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN (up) Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:17660452 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 31
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Author Haim, A.; Shanas, U.; Zubidad, A.E.S.; Scantelbury, M.
Title Seasonality and Seasons Out of Time--The Thermoregulatory Effects of Light Interference Type Journal Article
Year 2005 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 22 Issue 1 Pages 59-66
Keywords *Photoperiod; Microtus socialis; voles; thermoregulation; biology; animals
Abstract The change in photoperiod is the main environmental cue for seasonal function of the reproductive, thermoregulatory, and immune systems in rodents existing outside of the tropics. In Israel, the social vole Microtus socialis breeds mainly under short photoperiod (SP) conditions. Previous studies showed that exposing voles to light interference (LI) in the field during the winter resulted in death. The aim of the current study was to determine the thermoregulatory response of SP-acclimated voles to LI. Therefore, heat production (VO2) at different ambient temperatures (Ta) and nonshivering thermogenesis (NST) were measured. Results show that LI of 15 min every 4h during the dark period significantly (p < 0.02) decreased VO2 at Ta = 15 degrees C and significantly (p < 0.05) decreased NST-capacity. These results can at least partly explain why LI-voles died during the winter under field conditions, through eliminating winter acclimatization of the thermoregulatory system, or what is considered as “seasons out of time.”
Address
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN (up) Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 32
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Author Warrant, E.
Title Vision in the dimmest habitats on earth Type Journal Article
Year 2004 Publication Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol
Volume 190 Issue 10 Pages 765-789
Keywords Animals; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; *Darkness; Eye/anatomy & histology; Fishes/physiology; Invertebrates; Oceans and Seas; Ocular Physiological Phenomena; Orientation/physiology; Space Perception/physiology; Vision, Ocular/*physiology
Abstract A very large proportion of the world's animal species are active in dim light, either under the cover of night or in the depths of the sea. The worlds they see can be dim and extended, with light reaching the eyes from all directions at once, or they can be composed of bright point sources, like the multitudes of stars seen in a clear night sky or the rare sparks of bioluminescence that are visible in the deep sea. The eye designs of nocturnal and deep-sea animals have evolved in response to these two very different types of habitats, being optimised for maximum sensitivity to extended scenes, or to point sources, or to both. After describing the many visual adaptations that have evolved across the animal kingdom for maximising sensitivity to extended and point-source scenes, I then use case studies from the recent literature to show how these adaptations have endowed nocturnal animals with excellent vision. Nocturnal animals can see colour and negotiate dimly illuminated obstacles during flight. They can also navigate using learned terrestrial landmarks, the constellations of stars or the dim pattern of polarised light formed around the moon. The conclusion from these studies is clear: nocturnal habitats are just as rich in visual details as diurnal habitats are, and nocturnal animals have evolved visual systems capable of exploiting them. The same is certainly true of deep-sea animals, as future research will no doubt reveal.
Address Vision Group, Department of Cell and Organism Biology, University of Lund, Helgonavagen 3, 22362 Lund, Sweden. Eric.Warrant@cob.lu.se
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0340-7594 ISBN (up) Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:15375626 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 33
Permanent link to this record