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Author Scheibler, E.; Roschlau, C.; Brodbeck, D.
Title Lunar and temperature effects on activity of free-living desert hamsters (Phodopus roborovskii, Satunin 1903) Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication International Journal of Biometeorology Abbreviated Journal Int J Biometeorol
Volume 58 Issue (down) 8 Pages 1769-1778
Keywords Animals
Abstract Time management of truly wild hamsters was investigated in their natural habitat in Alashan desert, Inner Mongolia, China during summer of 2009, 2010, and 2012. Duration of activity outside their burrows, duration of foraging walks, and nocturnal inside stays were analyzed with the aim to elucidate impact of moon, ambient, and soil temperature. Animal data were determined using radio frequency identification (RFID) technique; for that purpose, individuals were caught in the field and marked with passive transponders. Their burrows were equipped with integrated microchip readers and photosensors for the detection of movements into or out of the burrow. Lunar impact was analyzed based on moon phase (full, waning, new, and waxing moons) and moon disk size. A prolongation of aboveground activity was shown with increasing moon disk size (Spearman rho = 0.237; p = 0.025) which was caused by earlier onsets (rho =-0.161; p = 0.048); additionally, foraging walks took longer (Pearson r = 0.037; p = 0.037). Temperature of different periods of time was analyzed, i.e., mean of whole day, of the activity phase, minimum, and maximum. Moreover, this was done for the current day and the previous 3 days. Overall, increasing ambient and soil temperatures were associated with shortening of activity by earlier offsets of activity and shorter nocturnal stays inside their burrows. Most influential temperatures for activity duration were the maximum ambient temperature, 3 days before (stepwise regression analysis R = 0.499; R (2) = 0.249; F = 7.281; p = 0.013) and soil temperature during activity phase, 1 day before (R = 0.644; R (2) = 0.283; F = 7.458; p = 0.004).
Address Department of Animal Physiology, Biological Institute, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70569, Stuttgart, Germany, elke.scheibler@bio.uni-stuttgart.de
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0020-7128 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24408344 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 804
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Author Borniger, J.C.; Maurya, S.K.; Periasamy, M.; Nelson, R.J.
Title Acute dim light at night increases body mass, alters metabolism, and shifts core body temperature circadian rhythms Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 31 Issue (down) 8 Pages 917-925
Keywords Animals; Body temperature; calorimetry; circadian; light at night; metabolism
Abstract The circadian system is primarily entrained by the ambient light environment and is fundamentally linked to metabolism. Mounting evidence suggests a causal relationship among aberrant light exposure, shift work, and metabolic disease. Previous research has demonstrated deleterious metabolic phenotypes elicited by chronic (>4 weeks) exposure to dim light at night (DLAN) ( approximately 5 lux). However, the metabolic effects of short-term (<2 weeks) exposure to DLAN are unspecified. We hypothesized that metabolic alterations would arise in response to just 2 weeks of DLAN. Specifically, we predicted that mice exposed to dim light would gain more body mass, alter whole body metabolism, and display altered body temperature (Tb) and activity rhythms compared to mice maintained in dark nights. Our data largely support these predictions; DLAN mice gained significantly more mass, reduced whole body energy expenditure, increased carbohydrate over fat oxidation, and altered temperature circadian rhythms. Importantly, these alterations occurred despite similar activity locomotor levels (and rhythms) and total food intake between groups. Peripheral clocks are potently entrained by body temperature rhythms, and the deregulation of body temperature we observed may contribute to metabolic problems due to “internal desynchrony” between the central circadian oscillator and temperature sensitive peripheral clocks. We conclude that even relatively short-term exposure to low levels of nighttime light can influence metabolism to increase mass gain.
Address Department of Neuroscience and
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24933325 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 846
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Author Bachner, J.P.
Title The Lighting Equation. Type Journal Article
Year 2004 Publication In: Gourmet Retailer Abbreviated Journal
Volume 25 Issue (down) 8 Pages 190–192
Keywords Economy
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 875
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Author Clifton, C.; Cooley, R.; Rennie, J.
Title TopCat: data mining for topic identification in a text corpus Type Journal Article
Year 2004 Publication IEEE Transactions on Knowledge and Data Engineering Abbreviated Journal IEEE Trans. Knowl. Data Eng.
Volume 16 Issue (down) 8 Pages 949-964
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1041-4347 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 915
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Author Rea, M. S.; Bierman, A.
Title Spectral considerations for outdoor lighting: Consequences for sky glow Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Res. & Tech.
Volume 47 Issue (down) 8 Pages 920-930
Keywords Lighting; skyglow; spectrum; scattering; aerosol; modeling
Abstract It is well known that the magnitude of sky glow on a clear night depends upon the aerosol content in the atmosphere and the spectral power distribution (amount and spectrum). Sources with a greater proportion of short-wavelength radiation produce more backscattered radiation, but as aerosol density increases, the differential effect of spectrum becomes smaller. Sky glow magnitude also depends upon the operating characteristics of the detector and will be greater when the spectrum of the backscattered radiation is tuned to the spectral band-pass characteristics of the detector. The human visual system is most often used to assess sky glow magnitude, but its spectral response is not limited to a single, univariate detector. Rather, the retina is composed of many neural channels, each with its own spectral and absolute sensitivities to optical radiation. Since we can use a different neural channel to see an individual star than we do to gain an overall impression of sky brightness, changes to the spectral power distribution of backscattered radiation differentially, and simultaneously, affect one’s ability to see a single star and to assess sky brightness. A general method for assessing sky glow based upon aerosol content, spectral power distribution and the specific operating characteristics of a detector, human or otherwise, is offered.
Address Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher The Society of Light and Lighting Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1065
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