toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Rea, M.S.; Bullough, J.D.; Brons, M.S. url  openurl
  Title Spectral considerations for outdoor lighting: Designing for perceived scene brightness Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Res. & Tech.  
  Volume 47 Issue (down) 8 Pages 909-919  
  Keywords Public Safety; outdoor lighting; photopic; photopic illuminance; human vision; metrics; task lighting; parking lots  
  Abstract Photopic illuminance is the photometric metric used today for specifying parking lot lighting levels. The photopic luminous efficiency function does not represent the spectral sensitivity of the perceived scene brightness of parking lots. Sources with a greater proportion of short-wavelength radiation will be seen as brighter for the same photopic illuminance. Moreover, the psychological benefit of providing people with a sense of safety and security in a parking lot is better correlated with the perceived brightness of the parking lot than with its photopic illuminance. Because photopic illuminance is not predictive of the psychological benefit expected from the parking lot lighting system, electric energy will be unnecessarily wasted if specifications are based upon this metric. Specifying parking lot lighting with a benefit metric based upon perceived scene brightness could reduce electric power requirements as well as the amount of radiant energy reflecting from the pavement and escaping into the night sky. A method of equating brightness for different spectral power distributions is provided.  
  Address Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1074  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zozaya, S.M.; Alford, R.A.; Schwarzkopf, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Invasive house geckos are more willing to use artificial lights than are native geckos: House geckos and artificial lights Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Austral Ecology Abbreviated Journal Austral Ecology  
  Volume 40 Issue (down) 8 Pages 982–987  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1442-9985 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1209  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Solano Lamphar, H.A.; Kocifaj, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Urban night-sky luminance due to different cloud types: A numerical experiment Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Res. & Tech.  
  Volume 48 Issue (down) 8 Pages 1017-1033  
  Keywords Skyglow; modeling; urban; clouds; radiative transfer  
  Abstract In this paper, we analyse theoretically and numerically the sky glow in urban and suburban areas, focusing on the zenith-normalised luminance of a cloudy sky. The results suggest that the altitude of a cloud imposes important changes in the luminance distribution. Peak values of sky luminance can be observed at a distance d = R + h tan (z), where R is the city radius, and h is the cloud altitude. Fluctuations of the zenith-normalised luminance over the city are dictated by three effects, specifically (i) extinction and backscatter in the undercloud atmosphere, (ii) the cloud properties and (iii) the radiant intensity function of the dominant ground-based light sources. For high clouds, the aerosol optical property is evident at moderate elevation angles. The light beams emitted from different parts of the city propagate along different inclined trajectories before they contribute to the elevated zenith luminance of low clouds. Then, multiple factors combine together to form the light field at the ground, city-size and city emission pattern being of specific importance.  
  Address Cátedras CONACYT, Instituto de investigaciones Dr José María Luis Mora, Programa Interdisciplinario de Estudios Metropolitanos (CentroMet), Plaza Valentín Gómez Farías #12 Col. San Juan Mixcoac, México D.F. C.P 03730. E-mail: lamphar(at)gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher SAGE Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1477-0938 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1225  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wakefield, A.; Stone, E.L.; Jones, G.; Harris, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light-emitting diode street lights reduce last-ditch evasive manoeuvres by moths to bat echolocation calls Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Royal Society Open Science Abbreviated Journal Roy. Soc. Open Sci.  
  Volume 2 Issue (down) 8 Pages  
  Keywords Animals; artificial lighting; light-emitting diode; street lights; bats; moth predation; Nyctalus  
  Abstract The light-emitting diode (LED) street light market is expanding globally, and it is important to understand how LED lights affect wildlife populations. We compared evasive flight responses of moths to bat echolocation calls experimentally under LED-lit and -unlit conditions. Significantly, fewer moths performed ‘powerdive’ flight manoeuvres in response to bat calls (feeding buzz sequences from Nyctalus spp.) under an LED street light than in the dark. LED street lights reduce the anti-predator behaviour of moths, shifting the balance in favour of their predators, aerial hawking bats.  
  Address School of Biological Sciences, Life Sciences Building, University of Bristol, 24 Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TQ, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1237  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Pan, J.; Yang, Y.; Yang, B.; Dai, W.; Yu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Human-Friendly Light-Emitting Diode Source Stimulates Broiler Growth Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 10 Issue (down) 8 Pages e0135330  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Previous study and our laboratory have reported that short-wavelength (blue and green) light and combination stimulate broiler growth. However, short-wavelength stimuli could have negative effects on poultry husbandry workers. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of human-friendly yellow LED light, which is acceptable to humans and close to green light, on broiler growth. We also aimed to investigate the potential quantitative relationship between the wavelengths of light used for artificial illumination and growth parameters in broilers. After hatching, 360 female chicks (“Meihuang” were evenly divided into six lighting treatment groups: white LED strips (400-700 nm, WL); red LED strips (620 nm, RL); yellow LED strips (580 nm, YL); green LED strips (514 nm, GL); blue LED strips (455 nm, BL); and fluorescent strips (400-700 nm, FL). From 30 to 72 days of age, broilers reared under YL and GL were heavier than broilers treated with FL (P < 0.05). Broilers reared under YL obtained the similar growth parameters with the broilers reared under GL and BL (P > 0.05). Moreover, YL significantly improved feeding efficiency when compared with GL and BL at 45 and 60 days of age (P < 0.05). In addition, we found an age-dependent effect of light spectra on broiler growth and a quantitative relationship between LED light spectra (455 to 620 nm) and the live body weights of broilers. The wavelength of light (455 to 620 nm) was found to be negatively related (R2 = 0.876) to live body weight at an early stage of development, whereas the wavelength of light (455 to 620 nm) was found to be positively correlated with live body weight (R2 = 0.925) in older chickens. Our results demonstrated that human-friendly yellow LED light (YL), which is friendly to the human, can be applied to the broilers production.  
  Address College of Biosystems Engineering and Food Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058, China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:26270988 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1241  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: