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Author Guo, D.-F.; Hu, S.-M.; Chen, X.; Gao, D.-Y.; Du, J.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sky Brightness at Weihai Observatory of Shandong University Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific Abbreviated Journal Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific  
  Volume 126 Issue (down) 939 Pages 496-503  
  Keywords  
  Abstract In this paper, a total of about 28000 images in V and R band obtained on 161 nights using the one-meter optical telescope at Weihai Observatory (WHO) of Shandong University since 2008 to 2012 have been processed to measure the sky brightness. It provides us with an unprecedented database, which can be used to study the variation of the sky brightness with the sky position, the moonlight contribution, and the twilight sky brightness. The darkest sky brightness is about 19.0 and 18.6 mag arcsec−2 in V and R band, respectively. An obvious darkening trend is found at the first half of the night at WHO, and the variation rate is much larger in summer than that in other seasons. The sky brightness variation depends more on the azimuth than on the altitude of the telescope pointing for WHO. Our results indicate that the sky brightness at WHO is seriously influenced by the urban light.  
  Address Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, Institute of Space Sciences, School of Space Science and Physics, Shandong University, Weihai, 264209, China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0004-6280 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1106  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Duriscoe, D.M. url  openurl
  Title Measuring Anthropogenic Sky Glow Using a Natural Sky Brightness Model. Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 125 Issue (down) 933 Pages 1370-1382  
  Keywords Skyglow  
  Abstract Anthropogenic sky glow (a result of light pollution) combines with the natural background brightness of the night sky when viewed by an observer on the earth’s surface. In order to measure the anthropogenic component accurately, the natural component must be identified and subtracted. A model of the moonless natural sky brightness in the V-band was constructed from existing data on the Zodiacal Light, an airglow model based on the van Rhijn function, and a model of integrated starlight (including diffuse galactic light) constructed from images made with the same equipment used for sky brightness observations. The model also incorporates effective extinction by the atmosphere and is improved at high zenith angles (>80°) by the addition of atmospheric diffuse light. The model may be projected onto local horizon coordinates for a given observation at a resolution of 0.05° over the hemisphere of the sky, allowing it to be accurately registered with data images obtained from any site. Zodiacal Light and integrated starlight models compare favorably with observations from remote dark sky sites, matching within ± 8 nL over 95% of the sky. The natural airglow may be only approximately modeled, errors of up to ± 25 nL are seen when the airglow is rapidly changing or has considerable character (banding); ± 8 nL precision may be expected under favorable conditions. When subtracted from all-sky brightness data images, the model significantly improves estimates of sky glow from anthropogenic sources, especially at sites that experience slight to moderate light pollution.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 539  
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Author Rajaratnam, S.M.W.; Arendt, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Health in a 24-h society Type Journal Article
  Year 2001 Publication The Lancet Abbreviated Journal The Lancet  
  Volume 358 Issue (down) 9286 Pages 999-1005  
  Keywords Human Health  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0140-6736 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 856  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Straka,T. M., Wolf, M., Gras, P., Buchholz, S., & Voigt, C. C. doi  openurl
  Title Tree Cover Mediates the Effect of Artificial Light on Urban Bats Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 7 Issue (down) 91 Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract With urban areas growing worldwide, so does artificial light at night (ALAN) which negatively affects many nocturnal animals, including bats. The response of bats to ALAN ranges from some opportunistic species taking advantage of insect aggregations around street lamps, particularly those emitting ultraviolet (UV) light, to others avoiding lit areas at all. Tree cover has been suggested to mitigate the negative effects of ALAN on bats by shielding areas against light scatter. Here, we investigated the effect of tree cover on the relationship between ALAN and bats in Berlin, Germany. In particular, we asked if this interaction varies with the UV light spectrum of street lamps and also across urban bat species. We expected trees next to street lamps to block ALAN, making the adjacent habitat more suitable for all species, irrespective of the wavelength spectrum of the light source. Additionally, we expected UV emitting lights next to trees to attract insects and thus, opportunistic bats. In summer 2017, we recorded bat activity at 22 green open spaces in Berlin using automated ultrasonic detectors. We analyzed bat activity patterns and landscape variables (number of street lamps with and without UV light emission, an estimate of light pollution, and tree cover density around each recording site within different spatial scales) using generalized linear mixed-effects models with a negative binomial distribution. We found a species-specific response of bats to street lamps with and without UV light, providing a more detailed picture of ALAN impacts than simply total light radiance. Moreover, we found that dense tree cover dampened the negative effect of street lamps without UV for open-space foraging bats of the genera Nyctalus, Eptesicus, and Vespertilio, yet it amplified the already existing negative or positive effect of street lamps with or without UV on Pipistrellus pipistrellus, P. pygmaeus, and Myotis spp. Our study underpins the importance of minimizing artificial light at night close to vegetation, particularly for bats adapted to spatial complexity in the environment (i.e., clutter-adapted species), and to increase dense vegetation in urban landscape to provide, besides roosting opportunities, protection against ALAN for open-space foraging bats in city landscapes.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2302  
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Author Aceituno, J.; Sánchez, S.F.; Aceituno, F.J.; Galadí-Enríquez, D.; Negro, J.J.; Soriguer, R.C.; Gomez, G.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An All-Sky Transmission Monitor: ASTMON Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific Abbreviated Journal Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific  
  Volume 123 Issue (down) 907 Pages 1076-1086  
  Keywords monitoring; light at night; light pollution; skyglow  
  Abstract We present here the All-Sky Transmission Monitor (ASTMON), designed to perform a continuous monitoring of the surface brightness of the complete night sky in several bands. The data acquired are used to derive, in addition, a subsequent map of the multiband atmospheric extinction at any location in the sky and a map of the cloud coverage. The instrument has been manufactured to withstand extreme weather conditions and to remain operative. Designed to be fully robotic, it is ideal to be installed outdoors as a permanent monitoring station. The preliminary results based on two of the currently operative units (at Doñana National Park, Huelva, and at the Calar Alto Observatory, Almería, Spain) are presented here. The parameters derived using ASTMON are in good agreement with those previously reported, which illustrates the validity of the design and the accuracy of the manufacturing. The information provided by this instrument will be presented in forthcoming articles, once we have accumulated a statistically significant amount of data.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0004-6280 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 195  
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