|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Brainard, G.C.; Hanifin, J.P.; Greeson, J.M.; Byrne, B.; Glickman, G.; Gerner, E.; Rollag, M.D.
Title Action spectrum for melatonin regulation in humans: evidence for a novel circadian photoreceptor. Type Journal Article
Year 2001 Publication Journal of Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal
Volume 21 Issue (up) Pages 6405-6412
Keywords Human Health
Abstract The photopigment in the human eye that transduces light for circadian and neuroendocrine regulation, is unknown. The aim of this study was to establish an action spectrum for light-induced melatonin suppression that could help elucidate the ocular photoreceptor system for regulating the human pineal gland. Subjects (37 females, 35 males, mean age of 24.5 ± 0.3 years) were healthy and had normal color vision. Full-field, monochromatic light exposures took place between 2:00 and 3:30 A.M. while subjects' pupils were dilated. Blood samples collected before and after light exposures were quantified for melatonin. Each subject was tested with at least seven different irradiances of one wavelength with a minimum of 1 week between each nighttime exposure. Nighttime melatonin suppression tests (n = 627) were completed with wavelengths from 420 to 600 nm. The data were fit to eight univariant, sigmoidal fluence–response curves (R 2 = 0.81–0.95). The action spectrum constructed from these data fit an opsin template (R 2 = 0.91), which identifies 446–477 nm as the most potent wavelength region providing circadian input for regulating melatonin secretion. The results suggest that, in humans, a single photopigment may be primarily responsible for melatonin suppression, and its peak absorbance appears to be distinct from that of rod and cone cell photopigments for vision. The data also suggest that this new photopigment is retinaldehyde based. These findings suggest that there is a novel opsin photopigment in the human eye that mediates circadian photoreception.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 529
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Stevens, R.G.
Title Electric power use and breast cancer: a hypothesis. Type Journal Article
Year 1987 Publication Am J Epidemiol Abbreviated Journal
Volume 125 Issue (up) Pages 556-561
Keywords Human Health
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 533
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Craine, E.R.; Craine, B.L.; Craine, P.R.; Craine, E.M.
Title The Light at Night Mapping Project: LAN MAP 1, the Tucson Basin Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Society for Astronomical Sciences 2012 (proceedings) Abbreviated Journal
Volume 31 Issue (up) Pages 139-145
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract Tucson, Arizona, once billed as the Astronomical Capital of the World, has long been home to at least ten major astronomical institutions and facilities. The region also hosts numerous productive amateur observatories and professional-amateur astronomical collaborations. In spite of the implementation of progressive night time lighting codes, the continued growth of the region has arguably deprived Tucson of its title, and threatens the future of some if not all of these facilities. It has become apparent that there are several difficulties in regulating this lighting environment. It is not easy to model the actual effects of new or changed lighting fixtures, there are compelling economic conflicts that must be considered, and adherence to various guidelines is often ignored. Perhaps the most fundamental problem is that there have historically been no comprehensive measures of either light at night or sky brightness over the extended growth areas. What measurements do exist are inhomogeneous and poorly accessible spot measurements at some observatory sites. These have little to tell us about the actual light distributions in the overall region, and rarely are informative of the specific light sources that offend the observatory sites. Tucson remains, for the time, an important astronomical resource. Because of its astronomical and lighting code circumstances, it is an interesting and valuable laboratory for studying these issues. In this paper we introduce an innovative new 5-year project to comprehensively map both sky brightness and associated artificial lighting over extended areas of development in the vicinity of important astronomical institutions. We discuss the various vectors employed in data collection; we outline the protocols used for each methodology, give examples of the data collected, and discuss data analysis and conclusions. This program has been underway since January 2012, and has already produced results of interest to professional and amateur astronomers alike.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 543
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hamidi, Z.S.; Abidin, Z.Z.; Ibrahim, Z.A.; Shariff, N.N.M.
Title Effect of light pollution on night sky limiting magnitude and sky quality in selected areas in Malaysia Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Sustainable Energy & Environment (ISESEE), 2011 3rd International Symposium & Exhibition Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue (up) Pages 233-235
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract We investigate the effect of light pollution as the important considerations that limits the quality of the sky brightness for the astronomical purpose. Selected sites that covered: Klang, Selangor, Merlimau Melaka, Ipoh, Perak ad Kuala Lipis, Pahang, Malaysia have been chosen in order to investigate the visual estimation magnitude for observing visible stars. The results also based on Bortle scale theory provides glimpses of potential quality of night sky quality that is currently lost in most urban area in Malaysia. From the results, Kuala Lipis, Pahang is the best candidate site for astronomical purpose with the range of magnitude from 20.3 till 21.5 magnitudes per arc second. Some recommendation for a better solution will also be discussed.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 544
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lolkema, D.E.; Haaima, M.; den Outer, P.N.; Spoelstra, H.
Title Effects of meteorological and atmospheric parameters on night sky brightness Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Report of the Netherlands National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM #680151002) Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue (up) Pages
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 545
Permanent link to this record