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Author Hoffmann, K. url  openurl
  Title Photoperiod, Pineal, Melatonin and Reproduction in Hamsters Type Journal Article
  Year 1979 Publication Progress in Brain Research Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 52 Issue (up) Pages 397–415  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract This chapter discusses the experiments done on male hamsters. It should be noted, however, that corresponding results have been obtained in females in nearly all cases, regardless of whether photoperiodic effects, the results after pineal manipulations or after application of melatonin are considered. Many mammalian species show a marked annual cycle of gonadal and other functions. In a number of cases it has been shown that the photoperiod, that is, the length of the daily light cycle and its changes, are involved in the regulation of this cycle. The pineal has been shown to participate in the transduction of photoperiodic effects of short photoperiods leading to regression and also of long photoperiods stimulating recrudescence. The latter effect is not only a suppression of antigonadotrophic effects from the pineal, but a positive stimulation. The exact role of melatonin in the photoperiodic mechanism and its site of action are still unclear. Strong effects of melatonin application have been found in photoperiodic mammals. Recent experiments suggest that not only the amount of melatonin, but its pattern of synthesis and release may be important in the conveyance of photoperiodic effects. No support for the assumption that the site of action of melatonin is the pineal itself has been found in experiments with pinealectomized animals.  
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  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 424  
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Author Rowan, W. url  openurl
  Title Relation of Light to Bird Migration and Developmental Changes. Type Journal Article
  Year 1925 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 115 Issue (up) Pages 494-495  
  Keywords Animals  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 431  
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Author Johnson, A.; Phadke, A.; de la Rue du Cann, S. url  openurl
  Title Energy Savings Potential for Street Lighting in India Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Lawrence Berkely National Laboratory report Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages  
  Keywords Energy; India; South Asia  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 432  
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Author Lyytimäki, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nature's nocturnal services: Light pollution as a non-recognised challenge for ecosystem services research and management Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Ecosystem Services Abbreviated Journal Ecosystem Services  
  Volume 3 Issue (up) Pages e44-e48  
  Keywords Economics; Ecosystem disservices; Ecosystem services; Environmental management; Light pollution; Scotoecology; Shifting baselines  
  Abstract Research focusing on ecosystem services has tackled several of the major drivers of environmental degradation, but it suffers from a blind spot related to light pollution. Light pollution caused by artificial night-time lighting is a global environmental change affecting terrestrial, coastal and marine ecosystems. The long-term effects of the disruption of the natural cycles of light and dark on ecosystem functioning and ecosystem services are largely unknown. Even though additional research is clearly needed, identifying, developing and implementing stringent management actions aimed at reducing inadequately installed, unnecessary or excessive lighting are well justified. This essay argues that management is hampered, because ecosystem services from nocturnal nature are increasingly underappreciated by the public due to shifting baseline syndrome, making most people accustomed to constantly illuminated and light-polluted night environments. Increased attention from scientists, managers and the public is needed in order to explicate the best options for preserving the benefits from natural darkness.  
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  ISSN 2212-0416 ISBN Medium  
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  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 433  
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Author Elvidge, C.D.; Sutton, P.C.; Anderson, S.; Baugh, K.E.; Ziskin, D. url  openurl
  Title Satellite Observation of Urban Metabolism Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication earthzine Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages  
  Keywords Economics  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 437  
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